Naked City

Intel Design Contest

What would you do with the abandoned Intel building?
What would you do with the abandoned Intel building? (Photo By John Anderson)

First Intel announced it would halt construction on its downtown chip design center after it finished the building's concrete shell, citing short-term economic uncertainty. Then it announced that -- whoops! -- it wouldn't be finishing the exterior after all, leaving a hulking steel-frame monolith in the center of one of downtown's busiest intersections. Just last week, the company announced it would consider selling the building, eventually finishing it, or just making it prettier. So now it's your turn: What would you do with the Intel shell? Would you turn it into a movie set? A hotel for the homeless? A three-dimensional billboard for Kirk Watson's next campaign? Send us your ideas on how to reuse, revamp and revitalize this downtown eyesore no later than April 13, 2001; we'll sift through the responses, pick the most creative, fanciful, and intriguing ideas and run them in a later issue. The grand prize winner will receive a catered dinner for four, courtesy of Chronicle food editor (and caterer extraordinaire) Virginia Wood, in Republic Park, directly across from downtown's most notorious landmark.

Send your ideas (we prefer pictures) to: Intel Contest, POB 49066, Austin, Texas, 78765; or scan and e-mail to erica@austinchronicle.com.

  • More of the Story

  • Naked City

    Local news this week in Austin.

    Naked City

    APD officer Samuel Ramirez is convicted of official oppression for forcing a woman to have sex with him while on duty, but a witness's statement may force a mistrial.
  • Naked City

    Developer Gary Bradley pulls back on legislation that would create a special development district for his Spillar Ranch property southwest of Austin, but the development could move forward anyway.

    Naked City

    Legislators introduce a bill to protect endangered Texas bats.

    Naked City

    The council takes up recommendations from the Urban Transportation Commission, and considers a larger resolution to revamp the city's system of boards and commissions altogether.

A note to readers: Bold and uncensored, The Austin Chronicle has been Austin’s independent news source for almost 40 years, expressing the community’s political and environmental concerns and supporting its active cultural scene. Now more than ever, we need your support to continue supplying Austin with independent, free press. If real news is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $10 or whatever you can afford, to help keep our journalism on stands.

Support the Chronicle  

NEWSLETTERS
One click gets you all the newsletters listed below

Breaking news, arts coverage, and daily events

Can't keep up with happenings around town? We can help.

Austin's queerest news and events

New recipes and food news delivered Mondays

All questions answered (satisfaction not guaranteed)

Information is power. Support the free press, so we can support Austin.   Support the Chronicle