FEEDBACK
Letters are posted as we receive them during the week, and before they are printed in the paper, so check back frequently to see new letters. If you'd like to send a letter to the editor, use this postmarks submission form, or email your letter directly to mail@austinchronicle.com. Thanks for your patience.
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Doesn't Think Cover Is Representative of Issues

RECEIVED Tue., Dec. 9, 2003

I am writing in regard to the poorly written headline for the story "Women Dig In: The Defense of Planned Parenthood Is the Latest Battle in a Long Campaign" [News, Dec. 5].
   Activists from the pro-life and pro-choice camps are of both genders, but this story's headline seemed to indicate that the controversy over abortion access in Austin is purely an issue of concern to the female gender.
   I don't think it is fair to either camp to stereotypically characterize this issue in this way. Certainly gender equity is an important concern that relates directly to this issue (a woman's legal interest in controlling her own body), but it is not the only concern. There is also a serious interest that the state has in protecting prenatal life (as articulated in both the Roe and Casey decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court).
   The resolution of this tension between two critical legal interests is and should be a legitimate cause of concern for Americans of both genders.
James M. Branum
(former Austinite)
Newcastle, Okla.

Don't Boycott New Clinic

RECEIVED Tue., Dec. 9, 2003

Can you believe that construction companies actually boycotted the construction of the new Planned Parenthood in Austin ["Women Dig In," News, Dec. 5]?! People like to make this into a pro-life/pro-choice debate, but what about all of the other, more widely utilized resources Planned Parenthood has to offer. Women's services like annual exams and birth control pills should not be discounted. Affordable health care is what is offered at Planned Parenthood, and I think it's a real crime to take that away from so many women who can't afford to go elsewhere.
Thank you,
Jen Riley

Music Writer Wrong on Atmosphere

RECEIVED Tue., Dec. 9, 2003

Did you actually compare Atmosphere to Black Sabbath and that hard rock bullshit to them ["Southern Rock Opera," Music, March, 22, 2002]? I'm from Minnesota and feel totally honored to know I'm from the same area as a group as progressive as Atmosphere. Give it another listen and think about it.
Jeff Helgeson

More Fashion, Less Gossip

RECEIVED Tue., Dec. 9, 2003

Hello,
    I write to chime in with the writer ["Postmarks," Dec. 5] who asked that the fashion writer, Mr. Moser, do more in the way of covering fashion shows or else change the name of his column to indicate what it seems to be; i.e., a society column. Thanks.
Sincerely,
Fred Taylor

Mr. Smarty Pants Wrong on Dallas Texans

RECEIVED Tue., Dec. 9, 2003

Your assertion that Lamar Hunt's Dallas Texans, which went on to become the Kansas City Chiefs, were the original team named the Texans is wrong ["Mr. Smarty Pants," Dec. 5]. They were the second team in Dallas to use that name.
   The first Dallas Texans were an NFL franchise in 1953, originally the New York Giants, and subsequently after the financial failure in Dallas were sold to become the Baltimore Colts, now relocated to Indianapolis.
   The 1953 Dallas Texans were owned by my late father, Giles Miller, and a group of other Dallas businessmen that included Curtis Sanford, who built the Cotton Bowl. They lost money on the football team because revenue that year derived entirely from ticket sales. The very next year, broadcast TV rights earned each team more than a million dollars. They were just a little ahead of their time.
   Mr. Pants, I depend on your accuracy. Simple fact-checking would have revealed the information I have just related to you. Attention to detail, please, sir.
Ed Miller

'Chronicle' Not Interested in 'Objective' Reporting

RECEIVED Tue., Dec. 9, 2003

The story about Planned Parenthood was interesting for the fact that the opponent of this project was routinely vilified in the article as a right-wing puritan ["Women Dig In," News, Dec. 5].
   Can you maybe, just maybe try for a bit of objective reporting? Would you have called say Martin Luther King a "rabble rousing nigger" or other such nonsense? I doubt it, yet it is OK to make a caricature and launch thinly veiled attacks against someone who believes in the sanctity of life. Scary the standards by which you "reported" this story.
   Maybe I made an error. Maybe, just maybe, that story was really on the op-ed page. Just not sure.
Dale Cebula

'Chronicle' Should Be Careful With Labeling

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

Thank you for the article by Rachel Proctor May regarding the Uncovered movie parties ["Not Your Average Movie Night," Screens, Dec. 5]. I plan to attend, as do many people I know. I do not consider myself to be part of a group of "hipsters, activists, or rabble-rousers." I have a graduate degree, a 35-year professional career as an RN, LCSW, and most of the people I know who are attending are also educated and professional. I/we love our country and our democracy. We also hope to preserve it. We see it as terribly threatened by the current administration. An active, educated, participatory population is essential to a healthy democracy. Please be careful with your labeling. Is objectivity forever gone from journalism?
Sincerely,
Kathleen Haynie

Probably Isn't Going to Happen

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

The BCS [Bowl Championship Series] represents everything that needs to be fixed in America. A few financially interested parties are able to maintain a system that benefits only them instead of implementing the obvious solution. And they lie about the reasons. Does anyone believe the BCS cronies when they say that a playoff can't work because it would result in undue academic stress on the athletes? Somehow it reminds me of the Bush administration blaming the Navy for that half-baked mission accomplished sign. Time is right for valid revolution.
   I'd love to read a story in the Chronicle about the BCS and how network TV, the bowls, and power conferences use their financial influence to keep the right thing from happening.
Patrick Byrd

American's Don't Understand England and Violence

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

In reply to Tam Thompson's letter ("Postmarks," Oct. 31) "What the UK Should Do About Guns."
   What on Earth are you talking about? It's true a lot of people in England do get stabbed or beaten with baseball bats, but even these figures are tiny compared to the amount of gun related death's in the U.S., and this is down to the simple fact that we don't have the same access to firearms that you guys do. You simply can't go around shooting people, which is what a lot of you Americans seem to think is OK. As for the rise in sales of medieval weapons, I can safely say that I haven't heard of a battle axe or morning star murder in a long time. Easy access to guns means easy access to kill somebody, on the spur of the moment it's going to be much harder to beat someone to death than point and shoot. Our gun crime is bad enough as it is, and they're illegal; if they were legal we'd probably have a bigger problem than you, but we don't because we have the common sense to realize that if you have a million guns lying around some of them will be used to kill people, which is your right, I understand that. I don't have access to the Chronicle at the moment because I'm back in the UK, but if you have a reply please e-mail spalton@yahoo.com, but in the meantime watch Bowling for Columbine, and it may open your eyes a little.
Chris Spalton

Best Family Outing – Dell Diamond

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

I think it's time for another "Best of Austin" poll, but there isn't a current update on your Web site where I can vote. I haven't had a chance to pick up a copy of the Chronicle yet, so I hope you'll let this vote count now. I would like to cast my vote for "Best Family Outing: The Dell Diamond in Round Rock – Home of the Round Rock Express." It's a great place to go whether you're part of a family, or a night out with yourself. It's fun, there's lots to do and see and you're treated like royalty the minute you walk in the gates. It's definitely the best thing to happen to this community and the surrounding area in a long, long time. Go Express!
Jeanne Craig

Beyond Solar, Austin Energy Not Doing What It Could

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

Editor,
    Converting to solar energy may be possible 20 years from now, but there are things Austin Energy could do now to reduce pollution ["AE Drops a Solar Bomb," News, Dec. 5]. Its Fayette power plant, co-owned with LCRA, puts out 170 tons of ozone-forming pollutants on a typical high-ozone day. By comparison, all of the cars and trucks in the metro area release about 160 tons per day.
    Our vehicle miles traveled have quintupled since 1973, but auto emissions have declined because of the enormous advances in engine design. Auto emissions will continue to fall as cleaner cars are sold and older models are retired. But Fayette just goes on polluting.
    The Clean Air Force has proposed tailpipe testing of cars with the goal of eliminating 7 tons of auto emissions. Austin Energy could clean up Fayette and eliminate 85 tons.
    Republicans on the Clean Air Force and TCEQ have decided that cleaning up Fayette would be bad for business. Democrats go along to get along.
    Folks who want solar energy should understand the irony. As long as Austin Energy can sell dirty energy, solar will never have a chance.
Vincent J. May
Elgin, Texas

Free Speech Includes Threatening Livelihoods

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

First: Hats off to the symbolism in The Austin Chronicle's Dec. 5 cover photo ["Women Dig In," News], especially for the woman with the jackhammer between her legs!
   Second: Would Louis Black and The Austin Chronicle support Chris Danze if he organized contractors against the construction of another Wal-Mart?
   Third: It seems to me these people are exercising their constitutionally protected First Amendment rights to free speech and free assembly.
   Fourth: In response to Jennifer Cee's letter to the editor ["Postmarks" online, Nov. 28], it's ironic that she's blatantly willing to use Danze's tactics against him. But, once again, it's her constitutional right to do so.
   Finally: You have to love Austin. Everyone is doing their part to Keep It Weird!
Love ya,
Eric Youngstrom

Women Should Determine What Is Best for Them

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

Chris Danze is the proverbial "boy who cried wolf" come to an abysmally ignorant realization ["Women Dig In," News, Dec. 5]. As men we can never know what pain and regret women experience when it involves children. Aside from the physical pain, the emotional turmoil that is involved with abortions is something no man could ever fathom. I give credit to Danze's adherence to his convictions. But those who believe that a woman should have a right to govern her own body need to show that conviction doesn't get drowned out by the "crying wolf" that Danze and those of his ilk are bellowing. As men we owe it to women to show them the ultimate respect by letting them determine what is best for them.
Sincerely,
Paul Chavera

This Person Doesn't Like Soifer

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

Jan Soifer was Rick Perry's lawyer for redistricting in 2001, and now she wants to run as a Democrat for district judge ["A 'Real Pesonal' Court Race," News, Dec. 5]? I am offended that she thinks she can pull a fast one on Democrats. She works for a Republican law firm. She worked with Republican superlawyer Andy Taylor. She was Rick Perry and John Cornyn's lawyer for redistricting. And now she wants good Democrats to vote for her?
   If she had half the common sense as she has gall, maybe she'd be worth voting for.
Patrick Walz,
Austin Democrat

Envision South Austin

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

Before we get too stacking high from Envision Central Texas, I wanted to share my (cough, cough) Envision South Austin plan. Super Wal-Mart at Ben White anchors my plan with a green rooftop for cultivating hemp. Now, that's Smart Growth!
   We'll reclassify Wal-Mart's unemployed illegal alien floor cleaners as farm workers to harvest our crop, part-time. Runoff from the parking lot will funnel into a giant bong. These big-box bongwaters will percolate across Travis Heights to recharge Blunn Creek. Residents can recycle their yard signs to read "Americans for Peace Pipe."
   Developers will use hemp to construct solar powered windmills atop each South Congress Avenue merchant. We'll enclose each windmill tower to create affordable store-top housing. The fab, formerly known as Motorola, will produce solar panels for these windmills which will blow any secondhand smoke from the bars toward East Austin. Excess energy generated by our solar powered windmills will power light rail down South Congress.
   At night, Riverside Hooters girls and customers can take light rail to the half-naked truth at Exposé then board the 2am train to the Show Palace for the naked truth. Now who's for light rail? On nippy nights, the girls can cross Ben White to spend their hard-earned booty on sweaters at the 24-hour Wal-Mart Supercenter before boarding the train back home to the rooftop windmill housing.
   Like you, I'm weary of the fussing and fighting by us diverse stakeholders. My Envision South Austin plan will do wonders to bring us together with a livable, sustainable, and affordable neighborhood for all. In fact, the light rail plan alone may present a sporting opportunity for me to entrust my stake in someone else's hands.
Wes Benedict

Shop Locally

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

This is in response to the letter to the editor "Can't Afford to Shop Local" ["Postmarks," Dec. 5]. It is so disappointing to see the mindset that shopping at Wal-Mart is so much cheaper than shopping locally. I would like to list several reasons why we should shop locally instead of at big-box operations like Wal-Mart.
   1) Wal-Mart is cheaper because they pay slave wages to poor people in China (who openly hate Americans) or Indonesia to make poor-quality clothing and products that keep people coming back to buy more.
   2) The Waltons are five of the 10 richest people on the planet, and the average worker at Wal-Mart makes $11,000 dollars a year and has no benefits available to them.
   3) When you begin to shop locally you will see that the price differences are not that great and the quality differences are enormous. Hence, buy better and buy less often.
   5) There are local thrift and resale stores that have great clothing and merchandise at lower prices and higher quality.
   6) Keeping your money in the local economy increases our economy in many ways, like higher wages, lower prices, and keeping the money in the hands of Austinites who spend their money in Austin, rather than the Waltons.
   7) It is important to understand what and who you support with the money you spend. It has to be a better feeling knowing you are keeping your money local rather than supporting sweatshops in other countries.
   Everyone can make a difference with the ways that they choose to spend their money. To find out more about local businesses and compare prices you can visit www.austin-iba.org or www.austinunique.com. These Web sites give information about all different types of businesses and services that are local.
Sincerely,
Wendy Land

Great Pizza

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

Just finished scanning your listings for pizza places and the best little place for New York style pizza isn't even listed. Rounders on West Sixth Street is a small pizza place that opened within the last year and has the best pizza this city has to offer by far! Won't go into an editoral on how great this place is, i.e., quality and quanity of pizza, service, and price, but if you're from up North and miss great pizza, stop by Rounders on West Sixth and give your damn yankee taste buds a real treat.
A.D. Kowalski

You Should Have Picked Us!

RECEIVED Mon., Dec. 8, 2003

Dear Editor,
    I was surprised and dismayed to see the Foggy Mountain Cop Killin' Boyz 2003 release, Horse Drugs and Texas Know-How (Roadhelmet Records), omitted from your best of Texas list. Because the FMCKB does not hang out at the Hole in the Wall with certain myopic music writers or cry rainbow-colored tears over the closing of the Armadillo, it's not surprising that they have never been mentioned in your paper. They're too busy shooting seagulls and snorting Oxycontin aboard the Sultan of Brunei's yacht when not rocking the tits off every nubile coed west of the international date line.
    Horse Drugs and Texas Know-How has been a critical and commercial success and set the bar high in the Turbo Gangster-Country genre. These Texans (and Mexicans) have resurrected the true outlaw soul of country and unleashed it as a rock anthem guaranteed to elicit envy in men, lust in women, and a collective raised middle finger to the mediocrity and banality so prevalent in today's musical landscape. In short, they have rodgered the ear hole of a generation.
    Your re-education begins here and now at www.fmckb.com. Believe what you see instead of seeing what you believe.
Sincerely,
BJ Steubine

Is Economy Really Improving?

RECEIVED Fri., Dec. 5, 2003

One of the front page stories from the Tuesday, Dec. 2, American-Statesman was about economic recovery – manufacturing up with some additional jobs in that area. This and other reports of economic recovery present the following conundrum: to believe or not to believe.
   Given the innumerable reports of inflated and inaccurate (fraudulent?) profits in the last several years by many major U.S. businesses (that either control or are controlled by the government) – the very same U.S. businesses that defrauded their investors and shipped millions of jobs overseas, and given the Bush administration's "get our way at any cost or by any method" strategy (including manipulating facts and the truth) – well then, why should we believe the recent reports of an improving economy, so conveniently occurring as the president and his administration flounder and drown in Iraq and consequently, desperately, are contriving positive, though misleading, spins on this issue to bolster their presidential bid?
Mary Patrick

Where Was "Texas Trilogy"?

RECEIVED Fri., Dec. 5, 2003

Congratulations to Margaret Moser and Gregg Beets for an informative article on the breadth and depth of Texas music ["The Top Texas 40," Nov. 28]. I daresay, however, that had you included any of the cited musicians and songwriters in your chorus, Steven Fromholz's "Texas Trilogy" surely would have ranked high on the list.
Fletcher Clark
Sound Advice

Pro-Choice Is Pro-Life

RECEIVED Fri., Dec. 5, 2003

Thank you for the featured article "Women Dig In" [Dec. 5] by Amy Smith and Louis Black's commentary regarding recent attacks on Planned Parenthood. I too have been encouraged at the response from local pro-choice advocates during these attacks.
   I proudly volunteer for Planned Parenthood because for 65 years, they have worked with women, men, and families in this community to make sure that everyone has the information and means to decide freely and responsibly whether and when to have children. The overwhelming majority of Planned Parenthood's services focus on prevention.
   As parents of four grown children and grandparents of eight grandchildren, my husband and I know what it takes to raise a child from birth to adulthood. As you pointed out in your commentary, if anti-choice hard-liners really want to make abortion rare, they should stop the assault on Planned Parenthood and help us expand access to family planning.
Robbie Ausley

Questionable Statistics, Without Sources, Offered to Prove Anti-Abortion Point

RECEIVED Fri., Dec. 5, 2003

In the article ["Women Dig In," Dec. 5] Ms. Smith contends: "Informational brochures that women will be required to read ... also claim that abortions can increase a woman's chances of breast cancer, despite the lack of credible data to support such a claim."
   This is irresponsible reporting; at the very least Ms. Smith could have stated that this is hotly debated. The fact is that 28 out of 37 worldwide studies have independently linked induced abortion with breast cancer. Thirteen out of 15 studies conducted on American women report increased risk. Most of the studies have been conducted by abortion supporters.
   Breast cancer is the greatest cancer killer among American women between the ages of 20 and 59. The incidence of cancer climbed 40% in the last quarter of the 20th century (since Roe v. Wade legalized abortion in the United States in 1973), while the incidence for all other cancers has either remained the same or declined.
   Every woman should know this information before getting an abortion.
Gerardo Garcia
   [Amy Smith's and Louis Black's response: We find your claims hard to believe, given that a number of credible sources, including the National Cancer Institute, an arm of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, have found no direct link between abortions and breast cancer. The NCI's most recent findings can be found at http://cancer.gov/cancerinfo/ere-workshop-report. In August, a committee of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists reviewed earlier studies of the relationship between abortions and breast cancer risks and found them to be "inconsistent and difficult to interpret." The committee noted, however, that more rigorous and recent studies "argue against a causal relationship between induced abortions and a subsequent increase in breast cancer risk." Given the firm conviction with which you offer your statistics we'd be very interested in your source or sources. Finally, do you feel in every medical case where there is even a suggestion of possible harm that the state should intrude, demanding patient education, or is your concern limited to issues in which you have a preconceived ideological position?]

'Chronicle' Should Help Shut Up People Whose Ideas Letter Writer Doesn't Like

RECEIVED Fri., Dec. 5, 2003

It is disappointing that you have chosen to sponsor the KLRU Distinguished Speaker Series including Alan Dershowitz. This man is known for defending the use of torture, advocating the killing of all Palestinians, and defending the right of pornographers to humiliate and endanger women. Please reconsider your support. You are not doing the community any favor.
Irene Heitsch

If You're Buying Bush on Forests, You Must Love Him on Iraq

RECEIVED Fri., Dec. 5, 2003

On Dec. 3, 2003, President Bush signed into law the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 to help to prevent catastrophic wildfires and strengthen America's long-term forest health. The legislation, based on the president's Healthy Forest Initiative, will reduce the risk of catastrophic fire to communities, help save the lives of firefighters and citizens, and protect threatened and endangered species. As a nation, we have watched helplessly as parts of America were devastated by wildfires that displaced families, ruined communities, and took lives. In the past two years alone, 147,049 fires burned nearly 11 million acres. The president understands the necessity to manage forest and rangelands to protect the land and prevent further destruction caused not only by fires, but also disease and infestation of insects. By working with Congress, he achieved bipartisan support for a bill that will not only protect endangered species, but also protect our nation's forests and nearby communities for generations to come. Uncontrolled growth, the result of years of unwise forest policy, has left our forests vulnerable to catastrophic fires. President Bush, with his Healthy Forest Initiative, introduced policies to encourage public participation in the review of the fuel-reduction and forest-restoration projects. Ultimately these projects will thin dense undergrowth and brush in priority locations that are chosen by federal, state, tribal, and local officials. As a result of President Bush's focused and effective leadership on forest health, his vision has become law. The Healthy Forests Restoration Act 2003 will aid in safeguarding our pristine lands by implementing a more effective and timely process to protect communities, wildlife habitats, and municipal watersheds from catastrophic fires.
Sincerely,
Debra Urias

'Chronicle' Subpar: Pro-Lifers Want to Protect Women Even if It Means Limiting Their Rights!

RECEIVED Fri., Dec. 5, 2003

What low quality, subpar journalism! Your article about Chris Danze was appalling ["Women Dig In," Dec. 5]. Instead of portraying him as the upstanding, politically savvy, religiously sound man he is, you have to make him out to be some sort of religious fanatic and monster. That is unmitigated bunk. Stop trying to fool others into thinking that pro-life people are irrational and extreme. We want to save children's lives and protect women from the damaging effects of killing their own kin! What is so difficult to understand about that? We are pro-woman, pro-child, and pro-life! Unlike pro-abortion people, we don't believe that a woman should have the "choice" to maintain the convenience of her lifestyle by destroying the life of another after she already made the choice that led to the creation of that life! It's that simple! Your false portrayals of Chris Danze and the mistruths you used in regard to the pro-life movement are cheap, low blows that mislead and hurt others to further your backward political agenda. You should face the journalism community with your head hanging and your tail between your legs.
Anne Billion

Doesn't Like Kirk Watson

RECEIVED Fri., Dec. 5, 2003

Dear Chronicle,
    Former Mayor Kirk Watson, Mr. High Profile figure, has the credibility of a lawyer. You'd think, after all his failed Smart Growth corporate development incentive schemes and subsequent sky-rocketing property taxes, people would realize that he barely qualifies to manage a Burger King. I have no idea what kind of high this profile figure is on.
    At least his Chamber of Commerce appointment (the Lone Star State's equivalent of knighthood) affords a situation where damage potential is minimal. I pray that it is so.
Jim Paine

Support Planned Parenthood!

RECEIVED Thu., Dec. 4, 2003

I am pleased to have read the Chronicle's piece "Women Dig In," featured in this week's paper [Dec. 5]. It is important for area residents to see what is happening in this situation. Rather than Chris Danze using his daytime to fulfill his obligation to those who hire him as their contractor, he instead is sending unsolicited e-mail, using intimidation outside women's health clinics throughout the city, and resorting to last-ditch efforts! I wonder how much he overcharged you for your last foundation so he could fund his activist work?
   One of the points that stood out to me was that the usual anti-Planned Parenthood protesters in the city are men ... not the women this clinic is designed for. We saw the same in the infamous photo of Bush signing the partial birth abortion blocker. All men, no women! Women must stand up and speak up for our rights!
   It is apparent that Planned Parenthood will build this new center in Austin, as there are plenty of contractors out there who would be pleased to have the work. In addition, the citizens of Austin need the different types of services the clinic will offer and will assure these needs be met despite Danze (sorry, but he doesn't deserve a "Mr." in my opinion)!
   I call for a boycott of Danze, and any of his associates. I will assist in any way I can to assure that the same tactics he is using against others be used against him.
   His voice is not louder than ours. Too bad we had to stare at his pathetic mug shot in your paper.
Jennifer Cee

'Chronicle' Biased, Ignorant, Insulting, Appalling, and Dumb

RECEIVED Thu., Dec. 4, 2003

As a former journalist, reading your "news" magazine is insulting.
   I see the Chronicle's crusade in the Dec. 5 cover story as a slap in the face to good journalism ["Women Dig In"]. There was no balance. Your coverage of the "anti-abortion" side was paltry and highly patronizing.
   I don't have enough space to describe the myriad ways it is appalling, other than to point out one small, pathetic example of unneeded editorializing: "As the right-wing assault on reproductive health care rights continues ..."
   Great. Your biased, ignorant viewpoint will be lauded by the choir of Range Rover-driving liberals in Austin! Kudos.
   I will avoid your publication from now on. If that's your mission, to attract only the liberal-minded, rabid Austinites who shop at boutiques but preach equality and eco-friendliness, I want no part in supporting it.
   Keep Austin Weird! (And dumb.)
Appalled,
Chad Barwick

China Grove Tales

RECEIVED Thu., Dec. 4, 2003

My high school girlfriend of three years lived in China Grove. That was 1980, seven years I believe after the song debuted. And not that you care or need to know, but I lost my virginity there, so that song has special meaning to me.
   Don't know where your info came from in what the Chronicle wrote, but I always heard the story was that the Doobie Brothers were driving into San Antonio on Highway 87, and their bus broke down. They were able to roll into Hero's Ice & Feed (the only thing in China Grove back then) where they called for a tow, and while waiting wrote the song.
FYI
Rik Scott
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