SXSW Film

Daily reviews and interviews

'Forward'
'Forward'

Love and Mary

D: Elizabeth Harrison; with Gabriel Mann, Lauren German, Whitney Able, Ben Gourley, Mary Bonner Baker

Houstonian Harrison knows the romantic-comedy formula: uptight heroine (German) bickering with a cute guy (Mann) who's actually right for her, food metaphors and pastry porn, loopy Francophone sidekick (Baker), somewhat labored references to Annie Hall, bridal shopping and a makeover, and a race against time to save a boutique bakery. Its premise – that a woman's boring and highly allergic fiancé has a bad-boy identical twin brother with better hair, and she gets to play house with him while he turns out to be actually rather sensitive, and her family all approves of him – is pure Hollywood wish-fulfillment, but the supporting cast of quirky Texans lends a welcome down-home flavor. Of note is Uncle Billy (Brian Thornton), who wears a form-fitting plastic bag as a garment to cure his asthma. The movie is always cheerful, and its technical credits are excellent, but it's best suited to audiences in search of confection.


4:30pm, Dobie

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