Questions Linger for Anthony Shore, Larry Swearingen

Shore to be first Texan executed in 2018


Houston serial killer Anthony Shore faces another death date, this one Jan. 18. Shore was originally set for execution in October, but that got halted by the Harris County District Attorney's Office amid rumors he was planning to confess to another murder: the 1998 killing of Melissa Trotter. Except Larry Swearingen had been convicted of kidnapping, raping, and strangling Trotter in 2000, and by then was preparing for his own execution in November.

Assistant District Attorney Tom Berg said his office revoked Shore's execution warrant at the request of Montgomery County D.A. Brett Ligon, who believed Shore was colluding with Swearingen. (He says a folder was found in Shore's cell with information relating to Trotter's death.) Berg said the Texas Rangers have since interviewed Shore, who admitted he had "nothing to do" with Trotter's murder. Shore alleged he and Swearingen once contemplated conspiring, but had since "parted ways." Berg, who says his office and Ligon's have reviewed the interview, said Shore decided not to "take the fall" for his fellow inmate. Shore has exhausted his appeals; Berg said he's unaware of any new attempts to stay Shore's execution, and concluded that his case will see its "inevitable end" next Thursday.

Shore’s execution is just the beginning of a busy month.

Swearingen, however, had his November execution stayed due to a filing error, and has since been granted additional DNA testing. Unlike Shore, who confessed to killing four girls between 1986 and 1995, Swearingen has maintained his innocence. His supporters, including his lawyer James Rytting, say he was in a county jail for outstanding traffic warrants at the time of Trotter's murder. The 19-year-old was last seen on Dec. 8, 1998, with Swearingen (who wasn't arrested until three days later), but her body wasn't discovered until Jan. 2. Rytting said forensic evidence suggests her body could not have been dumped in the woods until "a week or 10 days" after Swearingen was arrested.

Included in the evidence sent out for testing is Trotter's rape kit, which was never tested and could exonerate Swearingen should analysts uncover another DNA profile. Samples of hair particles found on Trot­ter's undergarments and the alleged murder weapon (a torn pair of pantyhose) will also be tested. The evidence was shipped out in December and testing will likely take four weeks.

Rytting was alarmed that the state had reissued an execution date for Shore. "They shouldn't be putting the guy into the ground with these questions still around," he said. He says two witnesses, with no connection to Swearingen, told the D.A.'s Office that Shore suggested to them that he was connected to Trotter's murder. The information, Rytting said, would "sure as hell" make Shore a suspect had it been provided prior to Swearingen's conviction. "It's a type of incriminating statement the prosecution seizes on all the time," he said. "You don't get to wiggle out of it with an 'Aw shucks, I was kidding.'"

Shore will likely mark the first state-sanctioned killing of 2018, and his is just the beginning. William Rayford is scheduled for Jan. 30, and John Battaglia for Feb. 1.

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KEYWORDS FOR THIS STORY

Larry Swearingen, Anthony Shore, Death Watch

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