A Future for Local Community Policing Conference?

I.C.A.R.E. relies on private funding, needs more

A Future for Local Community Policing Conference?

The Austin Police Department's Office of Community Liaison hosted its second annual I.C.A.R.E. Community Conference in early August. The four-day event, now in its second year, offers sessions on mental health first aid, response to resistance training, and other community policing issues. Organizers hope to bring I.C.A.R.E. back next year, but, as usual with events like it, that will come down to funding. It costs $5,000 to $6,000 to put the conference on, and many of the presenters are law enforcement officials volunteering their time. But the OCL budget doesn't have funds marked specifically for this kind of activity; the majority of I.C.A.R.E. funding comes from donations to its nonprofit, the Austin Police Community Liaison Corporation.

"People seem to love [I.C.A.R.E.]," said OCL manager Mike Sheffield. "Especially the portion where we had mental health training for the first day. A lot of folks enjoyed that. They were very interested and felt like they got something out of that. And then, of course, the Saturday where they're out there at the academy seeing through officers' eyes the situations officers face." Sheffield said 100 people attended parts of the four-day session this year. He hopes to get that number up to 200 should I.C.A.R.E. move forward. Community members can donate to help keep the conference going at www.oclcorp.org/donate.html.

A note to readers: Bold and uncensored, The Austin Chronicle has been Austin’s independent news source for almost 40 years, expressing the community’s political and environmental concerns and supporting its active cultural scene. Now more than ever, we need your support to continue supplying Austin with independent, free press. If real news is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $10 or whatever you can afford, to help keep our journalism on stands.

Support the Chronicle  

READ MORE
More by Nina Hernandez
Indoor Skydiving Lets You Train Your Dragon in Virtual Reality
Indoor Skydiving Lets You Train Your Dragon in Virtual Reality
Taking to the skies with iFly's latest immersive VR

March 27, 2019

New Study Changes City Council's View of Flood Risk
New Study Changes City Council's View of Flood Risk
Puzzling over a variance on Avenue D, and spending the first of the 2018 bond funds

March 15, 2019

KEYWORDS FOR THIS STORY

I.C.A.R.E, Mike Sheffield, I.C.A.R.E. Community Conference

MORE IN THE ARCHIVES
NEWSLETTERS
One click gets you all the newsletters listed below

Breaking news, arts coverage, and daily events

Can't keep up with happenings around town? We can help.

Austin's queerest news and events

New recipes and food news delivered Mondays

All questions answered (satisfaction not guaranteed)

Information is power. Support the free press, so we can support Austin.   Support the Chronicle