The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/news/2002-05-03/85786/

Naked City

CLEAN-Up the Fun

By Jordan Smith, May 3, 2002, News

In true, sneaky federal government fashion, a byzantine new bill, HR 3782, currently -- and quietly -- winding its way through Congress would hold music and other live entertainment promoters criminally liable for any drug use taking place during their sponsored event.

While much of the redundantly titled Clean, Learn, Educate, Abolish, Neutralize and Undermine Production (CLEAN-UP) Methamphetamine Act of 2002 would increase funding and other related resources for detection and cleanup of clandestine meth labs, one nicely hidden provision seeks to change the language of the federal Controlled Substances Act to include a new section relating to "promoters of drug-oriented entertainment." Section 305 would provide for a fine and/or up to nine years in federal prison for anyone who "knowingly promotes any rave, dance, music or other entertainment event, that takes place under circumstances where the promoter knows, or reasonably ought to know that a controlled substance will be used."

Drug war foes are already crying foul, claiming that the provision is unduly broad and unfairly targets professional promoters of legitimate entertainment events. The Electronic Music Defense and Education Fund issued a statement that they're "concerned that this law could be used to prosecute the promoters of any well attended entertainment event whether it be a rave, a concert, a major league sports game, or even a high school dance." For the full text of HR 3782, see www.thomas.loc.gov. Simply for more info, see www.emdef.org.

Copyright © 2020 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/news/2002-05-03/85786/

Naked City

CLEAN-Up the Fun

By Jordan Smith, May 3, 2002, News

In true, sneaky federal government fashion, a byzantine new bill, HR 3782, currently -- and quietly -- winding its way through Congress would hold music and other live entertainment promoters criminally liable for any drug use taking place during their sponsored event.

While much of the redundantly titled Clean, Learn, Educate, Abolish, Neutralize and Undermine Production (CLEAN-UP) Methamphetamine Act of 2002 would increase funding and other related resources for detection and cleanup of clandestine meth labs, one nicely hidden provision seeks to change the language of the federal Controlled Substances Act to include a new section relating to "promoters of drug-oriented entertainment." Section 305 would provide for a fine and/or up to nine years in federal prison for anyone who "knowingly promotes any rave, dance, music or other entertainment event, that takes place under circumstances where the promoter knows, or reasonably ought to know that a controlled substance will be used."

Drug war foes are already crying foul, claiming that the provision is unduly broad and unfairly targets professional promoters of legitimate entertainment events. The Electronic Music Defense and Education Fund issued a statement that they're "concerned that this law could be used to prosecute the promoters of any well attended entertainment event whether it be a rave, a concert, a major league sports game, or even a high school dance." For the full text of HR 3782, see www.thomas.loc.gov. Simply for more info, see www.emdef.org.

Copyright © 2020 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

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