Ray Wylie Hubbard

Tell the Devil I'm Getting There as Fast as I Can (Bordello Records)

Summer Jams Clearance Sale, Part 2

Ray Wylie Hubbard rides shotgun to the apocalypse, like Major Kong straddling the bomb to destruction in Dr. Strangelove. On his 17th long-player, Wimberley's gypsy troubadour continues his new-century resurgence, born in the blues of the Eternal & Lowdown (2001), slithering through the Snake Farm (2006), and caught between A: Enlightenment B: Endarkenment (Hint: There Is No C) (2010). If Hubbard's past two discs turned more autobiographical amid the honky-tonks and biker bars of his youth, the battle between the damned and delivered still lingered as backdrop for the songwriter's wit, and Tell the Devil I'm Gettin' There as Fast as I Can ponders the cosmic directly. From his opening retelling of Genesis on "God Looked Around," Hubbard casts himself as folksy backwoods messenger, less preacher and prophet than wry observer of the ways of the world – the Mark Twain of Americana. The front half plays as his own Old Testament, a musical history learned at the crossroads of Lightnin' Hopkins ("Dead Thumb King") and Koerner, Ray & Glover's 1963 LP Blues, Rags and Hollers ("Spider, Snaker and Little Sun"), with the devil getting his due on shots at Nashville ("Lucifer and the Fallen Angels"). The backside bolsters collaborations. Lucinda Williams' lazy drawl adds a slower, more melodic tone to the exquisite title track (also featuring Eric Church), while local quartet the Bright Light Social Hour scorches five-minute psych-rocker "The Rebellious Sons." All of it builds up to quiet closer "In Times of Cold," a beautiful and crushing duet with Patty Griffin made even more poignant by the guiding hand of George Reiff in one of the local producer and bassist's final efforts.

***.5

A note to readers: Bold and uncensored, The Austin Chronicle has been Austin’s independent news source for almost 40 years, expressing the community’s political and environmental concerns and supporting its active cultural scene. Now more than ever, we need your support to continue supplying Austin with independent, free press. If real news is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $10 or whatever you can afford, to help keep our journalism on stands.

Support the Chronicle  

READ MORE
More Ray Wylie Hubbard
The Messenger: The Songwriting Legacy of Ray Wylie Hubbard
The Messenger: The Songwriting Legacy of Ray Wylie Hubbard

Doug Freeman, Dec. 6, 2019

Quit Your Day Job: Ray Wylie Hubbard
Quit Your Day Job: Ray Wylie Hubbard
Singer-songwriter on his days burning down Burger King

Doug Freeman, Aug. 25, 2017

More Music Reviews
Texas Platters
Guy Forsyth & Jeska Bailey
Conspirators (Record Review)

Reid Jowers, Sept. 27, 2019

Texas Platters
The Texas Horns
Get Here Quick (Record Review)

Jay Trachtenberg, Sept. 20, 2019

More by Doug Freeman
New Austin Music Worth Your Bandwidth This Week
New Austin Music Worth Your Bandwidth This Week
Dallas Acid blows some bubbles, KUTX remembers the Armadillo, and more music for the moment

Aug. 14, 2020

New Austin Music Worth Your Bandwidth This Week
New Austin Music Worth Your Bandwidth This Week
Ben Kweller hits the Continental Club stage, Threadgill's auctions some history, and more

Aug. 7, 2020

KEYWORDS FOR THIS STORY

Ray Wylie Hubbard

MORE IN THE ARCHIVES
NEWSLETTERS
One click gets you all the newsletters listed below

Breaking news, arts coverage, and daily events

Can't keep up with happenings around town? We can help.

Austin's queerest news and events

New recipes and food news delivered Mondays

All questions answered (satisfaction not guaranteed)

Information is power. Support the free press, so we can support Austin.   Support the Chronicle