The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/music/2016-08-05/cotton-mather-death-of-the-cool/

Texas Platters

Reviewed by Michael Toland, August 5, 2016, Music

No one could ever accuse Cotton Mather leader Robert Harrison of lacking ambition. His band's latest project promises a 64-song cycle, with each tune representing a hexagram from the I Ching. Wisely, Death of the Cool boils down the concept to 11 tunes, with content in the lyrics and a website for anyone looking. Let's face it, though: We're only here for the hooks. "The Book of Too Late Changes" – based equally on No. 24, "The Return," and the Who's mid-Sixties attack – boasts an exemplary specimen from Harrison's seemingly endless collection of instant classics. After that opening salvo, his local quartet slathers on sweet country rock ("Candy Lilac"), plangent balladry ("The Land of Flowers," "The Middle of Nowhere"), sneering lysergic groove ("Waters Raging"), winsome midtempo introspection ("Never Be It"), and more. Death of the Cool reveals melodic gems at every turn, regardless of spiritual bent.

****

Copyright © 2020 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/music/2016-08-05/cotton-mather-death-of-the-cool/

Texas Platters

Reviewed by Michael Toland, August 5, 2016, Music

No one could ever accuse Cotton Mather leader Robert Harrison of lacking ambition. His band's latest project promises a 64-song cycle, with each tune representing a hexagram from the I Ching. Wisely, Death of the Cool boils down the concept to 11 tunes, with content in the lyrics and a website for anyone looking. Let's face it, though: We're only here for the hooks. "The Book of Too Late Changes" – based equally on No. 24, "The Return," and the Who's mid-Sixties attack – boasts an exemplary specimen from Harrison's seemingly endless collection of instant classics. After that opening salvo, his local quartet slathers on sweet country rock ("Candy Lilac"), plangent balladry ("The Land of Flowers," "The Middle of Nowhere"), sneering lysergic groove ("Waters Raging"), winsome midtempo introspection ("Never Be It"), and more. Death of the Cool reveals melodic gems at every turn, regardless of spiritual bent.

****

Copyright © 2020 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

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