Summer Loving

Institute

Summer Loving

Institute

Catharsis (Sacred Bones)

Self-hatred can be a powerful artistic statement. Hate police, hate the government, hate the church, hate your woman – those are well-trod avenues of punk virulence. Directing that animosity inward, as Moses Brown does throughout these locals' debut full-length, resonates with unique potency. Institute's singer declares his emptiness on lead-off salvo "Perpetual Ebb" before giving himself a black eye with loathe-in "Admit I'm Shit." "Beat me to a pulp – like a dog – till you can't recognize me," he urges over moody, midtempo anarcho rock that, riding the colorful guitar of Arak Avakian (Glue), agile basslines of Adam Cahoon (Wiccans), and measly post-punk pitter-patter of drummer Barry Elkanick, resembles the Stooges with more right angles. Brown's detuned detox moan, showcased in cringing a cappella on standout track "Cheaptime Morals," lands between Darby Crash and Iceage's Elias Bender – if not a Texas School for the Deaf choirboy. Such ugliness cements the vision of Catharsis. Institute releases their wretched misery, and we feel better for observing it.

***.5

A note to readers: Bold and uncensored, The Austin Chronicle has been Austin’s independent news source for almost 40 years, expressing the community’s political and environmental concerns and supporting its active cultural scene. Now more than ever, we need your support to continue supplying Austin with independent, free press. If real news is important to you, please consider making a donation of $5, $10 or whatever you can afford, to help keep our journalism on stands.

Support the Chronicle  

READ MORE
More Institute
Summer Jams Clearance Sale
Institute
Subordination (Record Review)

Rachel Rascoe, Aug. 11, 2017

More by Kevin Curtin
Texas Platters
Daniel Francis Doyle & the Dreams
Unrecognizable (Record Review)

April 19, 2019

Settling in but Never Settling at the Old Settler's Music Fest
Settling in but Never Settling at the Old Settler's Music Fest
Executive Director Jean Spivey looks back at three decades of roots music

April 12, 2019

KEYWORDS FOR THIS STORY

Institute

MORE IN THE ARCHIVES
NEWSLETTERS
One click gets you all the newsletters listed below

Breaking news, arts coverage, and daily events

Can't keep up with happenings around town? We can help.

Austin's queerest news and events

Updates for SXSW 2019

All questions answered (satisfaction not guaranteed)

Information is power. Support the free press, so we can support Austin.   Support the Chronicle