The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/music/2013-03-22/billy-joe-shaver/

What Goes Around ... Comes Around

Final SXSW Live Shots

Reviewed by Tim Stegall, March 22, 2013, Music

Billy Joe Shaver

Stage on Sixth, March 14

You walk in, and honky-tonk survivor Billy Joe Shaver launches a monologue about Dale Watson writing "Where Do You Want It?," about the former's infamous shooting incident. "It wasn't worth a damn," Shaver drawls. "I mean, it was a good song, but they used it as evidence against me in the trial! So, this'un's called 'Wacko From Waco.'" Shaver's in top form, sampling a good 45 minutes of his hard country classics: "I Been to Georgia on a Fast Train," "I'm Just an Old Chunk of Coal," "Honky Tonk Heroes," the list is endless. As he fronts a band that could be the Supersuckers with great humor and a weathered delivery, you grasp how many late 20th century treasures Shaver, 73, has penned. An ambassador to old-school music values, to unvarnished honky-tonk, to progressive country as a Harlan-Howard-meets-Bob-Dylan figure, he also preserves the vintage era of Hank Williams and Ray Price. Billy Joe Shaver remains the diamond he promised he'd been in that song about a chunk of coal.

Copyright © 2019 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/music/2013-03-22/billy-joe-shaver/

What Goes Around ... Comes Around

Final SXSW Live Shots

Reviewed by Tim Stegall, March 22, 2013, Music

Billy Joe Shaver

Stage on Sixth, March 14

You walk in, and honky-tonk survivor Billy Joe Shaver launches a monologue about Dale Watson writing "Where Do You Want It?," about the former's infamous shooting incident. "It wasn't worth a damn," Shaver drawls. "I mean, it was a good song, but they used it as evidence against me in the trial! So, this'un's called 'Wacko From Waco.'" Shaver's in top form, sampling a good 45 minutes of his hard country classics: "I Been to Georgia on a Fast Train," "I'm Just an Old Chunk of Coal," "Honky Tonk Heroes," the list is endless. As he fronts a band that could be the Supersuckers with great humor and a weathered delivery, you grasp how many late 20th century treasures Shaver, 73, has penned. An ambassador to old-school music values, to unvarnished honky-tonk, to progressive country as a Harlan-Howard-meets-Bob-Dylan figure, he also preserves the vintage era of Hank Williams and Ray Price. Billy Joe Shaver remains the diamond he promised he'd been in that song about a chunk of coal.

Copyright © 2019 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

Information is power. Support the free press, so we can support Austin.   Support the Chronicle