The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/music/2006-09-15/402935/

Texas Platters

Record review

Reviewed by Melanie Haupt, September 15, 2006, Music

Edie Brickell & New Bohemians

Stranger Things (Fantasy)

Edie Brickell is what she is: a rich, rock-star wife reunited with her breakthrough band after almost a decade. The crunchy faithful among us will be thrilled to bust out the old peasant skirts and resume twirling about, but the appeal pretty much stops there. Brickell's older and wiser, and the music reflects that, but the smell of jam-band aimlessness permeates the cushions here. Despite its charm, Stranger Things suffers from being twice as long as it needs to be, which goes double for individual compositions. Two cuts, "No Dinero" and "Mainline Cherry," illustrate this point perfectly. The former is a whimsical snapshot of a couple that spends all its money at the club on Friday night and then doesn't have the bread to make it through the weekend. The latter is a surprisingly steamy bit of funk that quickly captures the imagination. Like that stoner friend who plants himself on your couch and keeps talking long after he's made his point, these songs wear out their welcome, and the album as a whole suffers as a result. A talented artist not trimming the fat? Stranger Things have happened.

**.5

Copyright © 2019 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/music/2006-09-15/402935/

Texas Platters

Record review

Reviewed by Melanie Haupt, September 15, 2006, Music

Edie Brickell & New Bohemians

Stranger Things (Fantasy)

Edie Brickell is what she is: a rich, rock-star wife reunited with her breakthrough band after almost a decade. The crunchy faithful among us will be thrilled to bust out the old peasant skirts and resume twirling about, but the appeal pretty much stops there. Brickell's older and wiser, and the music reflects that, but the smell of jam-band aimlessness permeates the cushions here. Despite its charm, Stranger Things suffers from being twice as long as it needs to be, which goes double for individual compositions. Two cuts, "No Dinero" and "Mainline Cherry," illustrate this point perfectly. The former is a whimsical snapshot of a couple that spends all its money at the club on Friday night and then doesn't have the bread to make it through the weekend. The latter is a surprisingly steamy bit of funk that quickly captures the imagination. Like that stoner friend who plants himself on your couch and keeps talking long after he's made his point, these songs wear out their welcome, and the album as a whole suffers as a result. A talented artist not trimming the fat? Stranger Things have happened.

**.5

Copyright © 2019 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

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