The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/music/2005-01-14/247025/

TCB

By Christopher Gray, January 14, 2005, Music


Super Size Me

The cobwebs are dissipating. Slowly. Any sudden spike in area Alka-Seltzer sales can be directly attributed to Free Week, Emo's grand experiment to determine if Austinites would be interested in seven straight days of no-cover shows. Suffice it to say, they were. The 13-year-old Red River anchor was packed every night save Sunday's experimental night, and even then a sizable audience was on hand to watch former Terminal Mind member Steve Marsh churn out backwoods blues on a homemade guitar under the appropriate alias of Spelunker. More representative was the previous evening, when a bursting inside room bore witness to a bottom-heavy display from Oh, Beast!, the ghostly post-punk acumen of Single Frame, and a snarling set from the Arm that ended abruptly when a disgruntled fan took it upon herself to unplug the bassist's effects pedal and was tossed in the ensuing melee. Though no less crowded, Monday was altogether more peaceful for the pleasant indie-pop of Vacation Gold, Masonic, the Fall Collection, and especially Dead Whale Tide but the real drama came later, when four people were arrested en route to the same afterparty. Tuesday's emo-punk bill brought a roomful of people more used to getting free music online than in person and sage advice from Rubberhed frontman Mike Boudreau: "If you're moshing and knock somebody down, please help them up." No one from Gorch Fock offered to pick anyone up Wednesday after their bleating set which began and ended with a sinister cover of U2's "Vertigo" flattened the audience like a demonic steamroller, finishing what Storm the Tower and Ignorance Park started. Meanwhile, Morgan Spurlock's fast-food cautionary tale, Super Size Me, played on the big-screen TV, leading "TCB" to draw some disturbing parallels to his own music-glutted life. Nevertheless, San Antonio's Animals of the Bible had Thursday's full house pop-locked into a comfortable Krautrock groove, before up-and-comers the Sword unleashed a frightening Seventies instro-metal attack that left dozens of jaws on the floor, and the Attak (iN) Formation topped it off with some once-a-year strangeness. While Camp X-Ray, Dallas' Constance, and Velorum gnashed their guitars inside Friday, fans of Recover and the Rise who had lined up outside as early as 7pm brought new life to the art of stage-diving outside. Tight jeans and Converse hung from the rafters during the Rise's political throwdown, before the night climaxed with Recover vocalist Dan Keyes literally walking across a sea of hands, probably because that was the only place left to stand. By this point, "TCB" was having a little difficulty standing, but Saturday brought a welcome gust of second wind. Inside, Pompeii started things off with some well-sculpted, cello-assisted shoegazing, before yielding to recent transplant Sally Crewe's terse, salty Britpop. The Chapters wove an Interpol-like web of shadowy intrigue as the outside rapidly filled up, hitting critical mass about the time What Made Milwaukee Famous launched into their exuberantly quirky rock. A trip back into the sea of bodies inside was well worth it for Svengali's splintering near-hardcore, as This Microwave World, never better, positively electrified the outside stage. They set the bar so high it was hard to imagine even Zykos clearing it, but they did with a set so intense it's a wonder singer Mike Booher didn't keel over from an aneurysm. And that was Free Week. It was a beautiful thing, watching people turn out in droves to watch all these great local bands, but it's worth pointing out that their shows rarely cost more than five bucks anyway. Now, if you'll excuse "TCB," he's going to crawl under a rock for a very, very, very long nap. See y'all later.

Copyright © 2019 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/music/2005-01-14/247025/

TCB

By Christopher Gray, January 14, 2005, Music


Super Size Me

The cobwebs are dissipating. Slowly. Any sudden spike in area Alka-Seltzer sales can be directly attributed to Free Week, Emo's grand experiment to determine if Austinites would be interested in seven straight days of no-cover shows. Suffice it to say, they were. The 13-year-old Red River anchor was packed every night save Sunday's experimental night, and even then a sizable audience was on hand to watch former Terminal Mind member Steve Marsh churn out backwoods blues on a homemade guitar under the appropriate alias of Spelunker. More representative was the previous evening, when a bursting inside room bore witness to a bottom-heavy display from Oh, Beast!, the ghostly post-punk acumen of Single Frame, and a snarling set from the Arm that ended abruptly when a disgruntled fan took it upon herself to unplug the bassist's effects pedal and was tossed in the ensuing melee. Though no less crowded, Monday was altogether more peaceful for the pleasant indie-pop of Vacation Gold, Masonic, the Fall Collection, and especially Dead Whale Tide but the real drama came later, when four people were arrested en route to the same afterparty. Tuesday's emo-punk bill brought a roomful of people more used to getting free music online than in person and sage advice from Rubberhed frontman Mike Boudreau: "If you're moshing and knock somebody down, please help them up." No one from Gorch Fock offered to pick anyone up Wednesday after their bleating set which began and ended with a sinister cover of U2's "Vertigo" flattened the audience like a demonic steamroller, finishing what Storm the Tower and Ignorance Park started. Meanwhile, Morgan Spurlock's fast-food cautionary tale, Super Size Me, played on the big-screen TV, leading "TCB" to draw some disturbing parallels to his own music-glutted life. Nevertheless, San Antonio's Animals of the Bible had Thursday's full house pop-locked into a comfortable Krautrock groove, before up-and-comers the Sword unleashed a frightening Seventies instro-metal attack that left dozens of jaws on the floor, and the Attak (iN) Formation topped it off with some once-a-year strangeness. While Camp X-Ray, Dallas' Constance, and Velorum gnashed their guitars inside Friday, fans of Recover and the Rise who had lined up outside as early as 7pm brought new life to the art of stage-diving outside. Tight jeans and Converse hung from the rafters during the Rise's political throwdown, before the night climaxed with Recover vocalist Dan Keyes literally walking across a sea of hands, probably because that was the only place left to stand. By this point, "TCB" was having a little difficulty standing, but Saturday brought a welcome gust of second wind. Inside, Pompeii started things off with some well-sculpted, cello-assisted shoegazing, before yielding to recent transplant Sally Crewe's terse, salty Britpop. The Chapters wove an Interpol-like web of shadowy intrigue as the outside rapidly filled up, hitting critical mass about the time What Made Milwaukee Famous launched into their exuberantly quirky rock. A trip back into the sea of bodies inside was well worth it for Svengali's splintering near-hardcore, as This Microwave World, never better, positively electrified the outside stage. They set the bar so high it was hard to imagine even Zykos clearing it, but they did with a set so intense it's a wonder singer Mike Booher didn't keel over from an aneurysm. And that was Free Week. It was a beautiful thing, watching people turn out in droves to watch all these great local bands, but it's worth pointing out that their shows rarely cost more than five bucks anyway. Now, if you'll excuse "TCB," he's going to crawl under a rock for a very, very, very long nap. See y'all later.

Copyright © 2019 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

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