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Psycho Beach Party
This campy send-up of surf and slasher movies uses Gidget movies as its comic template.
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Film Review  September 29, 2000, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...Like wow, daddio: This comic send-up of surf and slasher movies is a real solid sender. Using Gidget movies as its comic template, Psycho Beach Party camps up the details with knowing abandon..."

The Sound of One Psycho Cracking
John Cale talks abut composing the original soundtrack for American Psycho
Screens Story  April 14, 2000, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...American Psycho, which opens nationwide this week, is a movie that comes with a lot of baggage attached. Comparisons, preconceptions, premonitions, and heated discussions are sure to dog this highly charged movie..."

Psycho
“Norman - Is That You?” The time has come to abandon the question of why Gus Van Sant did it. Because he could and because he wanted to should be...
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Film Review  December 11, 1998, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...It's even fitting, thematically, that Van Sant should want to shadow a director like Alfred Hitchcock, for whom doubling, doppelgangers, and mistaken identities were dominant narrative constructs. Van Sant used the carte blanche he earned from the success of the bland and prosaic Good Will Hunting to return to his artier and more experimental roots with this highly publicized and modestly budgeted “re-creation” (Van Sant's word) of Hitchcock's 1960 movie sensation Psycho..."

American Psycho
Don't believe the hype: American Psycho is no more “the most disgusting film of the year” (as dodgy Brit tabloid News of the World tagged it) than it is the...
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Film Review  April 14, 2000, by Marc Savlov
"...Starring: Christian Bale, Willem Dafoe, Jared Leto, Reese Witherspoon, Samantha Mathis, Chloë Sevigny, Justin Theroux, Josh Lucas and Guinevere Turner. Don't believe the hype: American Psycho is no more “the most disgusting film of the year” (as dodgy Brit tabloid News of the World tagged it) than it is the wittiest..."

'Psycho Beach Party'
Coming soon to theatres near you will be two productions of Charles Busch's camp classic 'Psycho Beach Party' – but despite having the same title, they'll be surprisingly different
Arts Story  August 4, 2006, by Barry Pineo
"...From the Sixties through the Eighties, most famously with his play The Mystery of Irma Vep, Ludlam popularized the theatrical form that drew on old movies, pop culture, cross-dressing, and the kinky thrill inherent in the practice of (gasp!) forbidden homosexuality. Busch came along in 1984, mining the same vein with his Vampire Lesbians of Sodom, which became one of the longest-running plays in off-Broadway history, and the similarly popular Psycho Beach Party, a pastiche of beach movies, psychological thrillers, cross-dressing, and (gasp!) forbidden homosexuality..."

Psycho Analysis
An interview with Psycho scribe Joe Stefano
Screens Story  October 15, 1999, by Marc Savlov
"...Thirty-nine years ago, screenwriter Joseph Stefano was tapped by Alfred Hitchcock to adapt Robert Bloch's psychological horror novel Psycho for the big screen. That film forever altered the rules of filmmaking and has since become arguably the most famous, and certainly the most influential, thriller ever made..."

Teenage U.f.O. Psycho Sex Monster Show
Andy Kaufman cohort and rockabilly great Johnny Legend presents a two-hour compilation of trailers including all genres from beach party movies to sex roughies, and all sorts of vintage sleaze...
Film Review  March 26, 2002, by Marjorie Baumgarten


Hitchcock
Anthony Hopkins and Helen Mirren keep things interesting but there's more here about the marriage and partnership of Hitchcock and Alma Reville rather than a good backstage look at the making of Psycho.
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Film Review  December 7, 2012, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...Alfred Hitchcock, the undisputed master of movie suspense, is given fairly fanciful treatment in this movie, which is theoretically based on Stephen Rebello’s book, Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of ‘Psycho’. Yet, as written by John J..."

The World of Kanako
In this bloody Japanese thriller, a father searches for his daughter
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Film Review  December 4, 2015, by Marc Savlov
"...His grim outlook only intensifies when he receives a call from his ex saying that their teenage daughter Kanako (Komatsu, a lovely cipher) has gone missing. Once a psycho cop, always a psycho cop, and so it goes with Fujishima, who rifles Kanako’s drawers – ahem – and finds a hidden cache of needles and pills..."

Knight Moves
Chess is the operative metaphor in this new psychological thriller, though the movie could have stood a few pointers in strategy and good gamesmanship. The story centers around a mysterious...
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Film Review  January 29, 1993, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...Starring: Christopher Lambert, Diane Lane, Tom Skerritt, Daniel Baldwin and Katharine Isobel. Chess is the operative metaphor in this new psychological thriller, though the movie could have stood a few pointers in strategy and good gamesmanship..."

'Bates Motel' Re-Opens for Business
A&E takes a stab at psychoanalyzing Mrs. Bates' baby boy
DAILY Screens  March 18, 2013, by Richard Whittaker
"...Norman Bates was a good kid. Just look at the old publicity shots of Anthony Perkins in Psycho: Meek, mild, horrified by some unseen terror just out of frame..."

Demolition Man
Stallone and Snipes blow things up real good.
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Film Review  October 15, 1993, by Louis Black
"...This isn't supposed to be a real world, it's a conceptual backdrop, a perfect Hollywood pitch -- “The peaceful world of the future, totally passive, we drop in Snipes as the criminal and Stallone as the police and they blow everything up. What a great film idea.” When psycho criminal Simon Phoenix (Snipes) is accidentally released from cryogenic suspended animation, he's the only violent force in this too-passive world..."

Happy Death Day
Living your death over and over again
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Film Review  October 13, 2017, by Danielle White
"...The setup itself suggests what it means to be a survivor – to persist in reliving a trauma over and over – to keep getting up each day even when you know there’s danger, even when you know some people won’t believe you if you tell them what you’ve been through. Although there’s humor and a few “aww” moments, not to mention plenty of by-the-book psycho slasher action (though nothing too bloody or gory – the killing scenes quickly cut to morning), the quieter moments here and there take stabs at body-shaming and rape culture..."

When the Bough Breaks
A surrogate mother goes psycho
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Film Review  September 16, 2016, by Josh Kupecki
"...I don’t know about you, but when I settle in for a nice big slice of the latest Fatal Attraction knockoff, it had better take things above and beyond the hundreds of Lifetime movies that have come before it. This latest iteration in the “psycho third wheel” genre offers up absolutely no surprises, and is probably one the most dull and predictable films in this wasteland filmgoers call September..."

Knock Knock
Keanu Reeves stars in Eli Roth's latest horror film
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Film Review  October 9, 2015, by Josh Kupecki
"...Roth wisely draws out the drama, and both Izzo and de Armas strike the right chord between sexy and psycho. Reeves, on the other hand, doesn't quite fare so well..."

Before I Go to Sleep
Nicole Kidman stars as a woman who has amnesia and fights to uncover a big mystery from her past.
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Film Review  November 7, 2014, by Louis Black
"...A bit of a spoiler warning here, though few of you will probably ever watch this work: Insult is added to injury in the film’s bizarrely peaceful coda that wraps up no loose ends and sinks it even further into mediocrity. Imagine if at the end of Psycho, Norman Bates' mom turned out to be a sweet old lady innocently rocking in her chair...."

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues
Ron Burgundy is back – and the legend continues, at least in his own mind.
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Film Review  December 20, 2013, by Marc Savlov
"...Co-scripted by Ferrell and Adam McKay once again, the psycho-pompous Burgundy and his San Diego news team – disco-licious Brian Fantana (Rudd), racist sportscaster Champ Kind (Koechner), and just plain nuts weatherman Brick Tamland (Carell) – regroup to take their particularly egocentric brand of reportage to New York City. It's there that a billionaire Aussie (Lawson) is about to launch Global News Network, the world's first 24-hour news channel..."

High School
You come in hoping to toke on a big ol' fattie, but instead you find yourself wallowing in seeds and stems – again.
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Film Review  June 1, 2012, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...Henry sees his future going up in smoke, so he and Travis concoct an addled plan to get the entire school stoned on marijuana brownies, thereby invalidating the tests. Their high jinks involve a drug dealer named Psycho Ed – played by Brody, in a twitchy, heavily tattooed, and entirely tedious performance that should be buried before they revoke his Oscar..."

How Good Do You Look in the Shower?
Annie Ray sets up a Psycho-themed photo booth
DAILY Screens  August 5, 2011, by Kimberley Jones
"...Insert shrieking violins here: Austin photographer Annie Ray is setting up her signature photo booth at the Paramount Saturday night to coincide with the screening of Psycho...."

The Roommate
A college student grows fearful of her new dorm mate in this thriller which costars Minka Kelly and Leighton Meester.

Film Review  February 11, 2011, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...On that aforementioned Thanksgiving trip, Sara also discovers another girl who seems to have been the object of Rebecca’s unwanted affections. Until The Roommate, it had seemed as if the movies had advanced to the point where it is no longer customary to depict psycho killers as frustrated homosexuals..."

Terribly Happy
This Danish import is a wonderfully unhinged and a painstakingly constructed meditation on a place where good and evil meet, mate, and make sour times sublime.
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Film Review  March 12, 2010, by Marc Savlov
"...The rustic and, indeed, rusty town he's reassigned to watch over seems at first as though it were populated by eccentrics who’ve wandered in from the sets of Northern Exposure and Blue Velvet. However, Texans of the local persuasion, certainly, will smell the simple red reek of two-bit trouble massing against Marshal Hansen from the moment Ingerlise (Christensen), the beaten-down blonde wife of town psycho Jørgen (Bodnia), sashays into his new office with hungry eyes and multiple bruises..."

Waltz With Bashir
This Israeli filmmaker creates a dreamy, animated psycho-documentary about his attempt to recall buried memories of his participation in a massacre while serving in the military.
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Film Review  February 27, 2009, by Marc Savlov
"...This is the blast radius of PTSD, the ordnance of nightmares, the Ouroboros of aggression and concomitant guilt. Waltz With Bashir is a dreamy, animated psycho-documentary about the attempt of director Folman (Saint Clara) to recall, exactly, what role – if any – he played in the massacre of Palestinian civilians (most of whom were women and children) at the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps in Beirut in 1982..."

Vacancy
Luke Wilson and Kate Beckinsale play a couple who try to escape from the snuff-film motel at which they're stranded.
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Film Review  April 27, 2007, by Marc Savlov
"...That film mined the innate subterranean suspense of the Budapest metro for every single kilo of mystery it could get its paws on. Vacancy, which mixes bits of Psycho with Sliver (Stone! Baldwin! Berenger! Remember?) and still manages to come up wanting, works best when it slows down to catch its breath – which it doesn't do nearly enough..."

The Black Dahlia
Brian De Palma returns with a new crime thriller drawn from James Ellroy's fictional account of the notorious Los Angeles murder of a would-be Hollywood starlet dubbed the Black Dahlia.
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Film Review  September 22, 2006, by Marc Savlov
"...His 1987 book serves as the basis for De Palma's film, and after a corker of a re-creation of the L.A. Zoot Suit riots, the movie goes into a psycho-noir tailspin and never recovers..."

The Devil's Rejects
A viciously entertaining psycho-road-movie-revenge-‘n’-wreckage-romance.
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Film Review  July 22, 2005, by Marc Savlov
"...Soles. Any film that reunites Rock 'n’ Roll High School alumnus Riff Randall (Soles) and Principal Togar (Woronov) is aces and eights in my book, but Rob Zombie’s follow-up to his disappointing debut, House of 1,000 Corpses, does more than just exhume a morgue full of genre favorites – it’s also the year’s most viciously entertaining psycho-road-movie-revenge-'n’-wreckage-romance..."

High Tension
A gripping piece of splatterpunk, despite the fact that there's not much to it and the plot crumbles in the third act.
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Film Review  June 10, 2005, by Marc Savlov
"...Starring: Cécile De France, Maïwenn Le Besco, Phillipe Nahon, Franck Khalfoun, Andrei Finti and Oana Pellea. The Last House on the Left meets Psycho in this stylistically thrilling but ultimately tedious French import, dubbed and recut for an Americanized R-rating..."

The Chronicles of Riddick
Vin Diesel revs up the sci-fi franchise.
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Film Review  June 11, 2004, by Marc Savlov
"...Taking place five years after the events in the previous film, we begin with the escaped killer Riddick as he flees across an ice-bound planetoid dodging a group of mercenaries eager to collect the bounty on his head. In short order, the extremely reluctant hero is forced to cast his lot against a monstrous legion of psycho-religious world-conquerors, nicely deemed the Necromongers, who are led by their Lord Marshal (Feore) and who, like those pesky Borg before them, are hellbent on assimilating every society with which they come into contact..."

Wonderland
Dull take on real-life murder mystery has one titillating factor: the involvement of former porn star John Holmes.
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Film Review  October 24, 2003, by Marc Savlov
"...The mighty have fallen all over the place in Cox’s film, but it’s his period re-creation of the slapdash, rotten magic of West Hollywood in the early years of the Reagan administration that holds the film together. That’s not helped by his penchant for psycho-editing, replete with stuttering film, washed-out or oversaturated stock, and a soundtrack that feels like Scorsese’s GoodFellas after its been up all night partying at 10050 Cielo Dr..."

Monkeybone
Monkeybone's premise -- an artist thrust into the midst of his own art -- isn't the most original gig around, but Kaja Blackley's graphic novel Dark Town, the basis of...
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Film Review  February 23, 2001, by Marc Savlov
"...Monkeybone's premise -- an artist thrust into the midst of his own art -- isn't the most original gig around, but Kaja Blackley's graphic novel Dark Town, the basis of this film, handled it well. This film version does less so, ratcheting down Blackley's Freudian tale of a puppeteer lost amongst his creations to the level of a colorful, manic, kids' film, albeit one with a surfeit of psycho-sexual overtones and the titular farting simian..."

Kent Oscar, P.i.
Not reviewed at press time. Round Rock resident Kenneth Austin shot this detective film in various Austin locations. The first-timer's film is a noir-styled murder mystery about a private eye...
Film Review  January 19, 2001, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...The first-timer's film is a noir-styled murder mystery about a private eye who is enlisted to solve the murder of Sausage King millionaire Eddie Pflutzensteiner. The man's golddigging young widow is the prime suspect but there's also suspicion about his psycho daughter, Sybil..."

Stop Making Sense
The 15th anniversary is as good an idea as any to release this Jonathan Demme/Talking Heads performance documentary that is one of the very best rock & roll films ever...
Film Review  August 19, 1999, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...New prints were struck for this anniversary re-release and the sound was digitally remixed and remastered. This is the one which features David Byrne in the big white suit and such keepers as "Psycho Killer," "Burnin' Down the House," and "Take Me to the River" – to name but a meager few...."

Lost & Found
Former Saturday Night Live smarm-pimp Spade has done well for himself since leaving Lorne Michael's tutelage. A series of comedy features with the late Chris Farley and a trenchant move...
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Film Review  April 23, 1999, by Marc Savlov
"...Perhaps it's coincidence, but nevertheless, the role offers fewer chuckles than it does Freudian heebie-jeebies. Slight in almost every way, Lost & Found is an inoffensive, eminently forgettable bit of fluff, yet more proof of my theory that Spade should quit his comedy gig and tackle the title role in Bret Easton Ellis' American Psycho, already...."

Only in America
Only in America fashions a sprawling sense of a tempest-in-a-teacup madness, a madness that might also be described as Only in Dallas. The film employs a mountainfull of touchstones of...
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Film Review  July 25, 1997, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...The majority of screen time is devoted to Only in America's film within a film: Just Say No to Satan. Set in the Plano suburbs, this plotline is rife with fatuous society matrons, vigilant anti-drug enforcers, dope-smoking teens, Robert Tilton-esque televangelists, a reputed psycho/hit man named John Wayne, and a Murdering Cheerleader Mom-ish intrigue about a woman who plans to kill the daughter of her next-door neighbor because it will increase her own property value (it almost, sort of, makes sense within the context of the movie)..."

Truth or Consequences, N.M.
When Nelson Algren wrote books and screenplays about doomed petty hoods and white-trash dreamers, he was forced by technological limitations of the 1940s to actually spend time with said lowlifes...
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Film Review  May 30, 1997, by Russell Smith
"...Today, with Blockbuster Video and Tower Records franchises on every other block, first-time director Sutherland is able to work the genre far more efficiently by poring over Quentin Tarantino videos in alternation with Steve Earle and Bruce Springsteen albums. Sutherland's debut feature, though not a wretched failure, is so clearly an exercise in artistic filter-feeding that you may find yourself more amused by spotting elements copped from earlier movies (“Hey! That's the interrogation scene from True Romance with Martin Sheen in the Christopher Walken psycho gangster role!”) than losing yourself in the story at hand..."

Scream
A triumphant return to form for Wes Craven, Scream is the kind of psychological slasher film for which horror fans have been waiting years. The stalk 'n' slash gorefests of...
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Film Review  December 20, 1996, by Marc Savlov
"...Starring: Drew Barrymore, Neve Campbell, Skeet Ulrich, David Arquette, Rose McGowan, Jamie Kennedy, Matthew Lillard and Courteney Cox. A triumphant return to form for Wes Craven, Scream is the kind of psychological slasher film for which horror fans have been waiting years..."

Thieves Quartet
Ostensibly a film noir, Chappelle's feature debut borrows heavily from previous heist/crime films (Brando's 1969 The Night of the Following Day was cited by some) and in doing so, comes...
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Film Review  October 7, 1994, by Marc Savlov
"...But soon, unsurprisingly, all manner of snafus begin to crop up, not the least of which is the rising level of antipathy between Jimmy and Quinn. Jamie Denton has a nice bit as a psycho cop who's more interested in making time with the panicky Jessica than in protecting and serving, but the film eventually bogs down in a mire of predictable crime film clichés..."

Clifford
When Clifford is good, he's very, very good, but when he is bad, he's… rather a mediocre little fellow. Actually, it isn't Clifford himself who's weak but the film that...
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Film Review  April 8, 1994, by Robert Faires
"...As the titular ten-year-old terror, Martin Short is wired, warping in from somewhere between Seventies Vegas and Fifties Hollywood to put his kitschy comic spin on the creature called “the problem child.” And who better to play an obnoxious brat than the creator of giddy, mildly unsettling man-child Ed Grimley? Short's much more engaging -- and disturbing -- than most child actors playing wicked kids. In fact, in a Bad Seed by Bad Seed comparison, Short blasts li'l Mac Culkin out of the psycho ward..."

The Good Son
Like Stepfather, like Son. Well, sort of. In the latest chapter of his “Hey! There's a Psycho in the Family” series, director Ruben (The Stepfather, Sleeping With the Enemy) turns...
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Film Review  October 1, 1993, by Robert Faires
"...Well, sort of. In the latest chapter of his “Hey! There's a Psycho in the Family” series, director Ruben (The Stepfather, Sleeping With the Enemy) turns from male adult to male child as a source for mayhem..."

The Temp
Alternate titles abound for this latest entry in the female psycho genre: The Hand That Types the Letters, Single White Secretary, Fatal Dictation. Like her nutso predecessors, the Kelly Girl...
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Film Review  February 19, 1993, by Steve Davis
"...Starring: Timothy Hutton, Lara Flynn Boyle, Faye Dunaway, Dwight Schultz, Oliver Platt and Steven Weber. Alternate titles abound for this latest entry in the female psycho genre: The Hand That Types the Letters, Single White Secretary, Fatal Dictation..."

Nowhere to Run
A surprisingly serviceable take on the western Shane, this one has escaped con Van Damme hooking up with innocent mother of two (Arquette) just as the evil developer tries to...
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Film Review  January 22, 1993, by Louis Black
"...A surprisingly serviceable take on the western Shane, this one has escaped con Van Damme hooking up with innocent mother of two (Arquette) just as the evil developer tries to drive her from her farm. It's a not very imaginative riff on the classic -- mysterious stranger comes to the aid of poor farmers whose land an evil magnate wants for his empire -- even down to the fact that the most interesting performances are turned in by the actors playing the hired-killer psycho (Jack Palance and Ted Levine, respectively)..."

Raising Cain
De Palma once again blatantly borrows from other movies without shame and rubs your nose in every camera trick imaginable, but he also does something of which he's seldom been guilty: He ignores the fundamental principles of suspense.

Film Review  August 14, 1992, by Steve Davis
"...De Palma's detractors will absolutely relish Raising Cain, a film that proves every negative thing they've ever said about him is true. In this ill-conceived hybrid of Sybil and Psycho, De Palma once again blatantly borrows from other movies without shame and rubs your nose in every camera trick imaginable, but he also does something of which he's seldom been guilty: he ignores the fundamental principles of suspense..."

Blood & Concrete: A Love Story
Joey Turks (Zane) is a none-too-bright Hollywood sneak thief with nicer hair than mine, sort of a 90210-guy gone awry. Stabbed in the process of burglarizing a crony's homestead, Joey...
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Film Review  November 22, 1991, by Marc Savlov
"...Joey Turks (Zane) is a none-too-bright Hollywood sneak thief with nicer hair than mine, sort of a 90210-guy gone awry. Stabbed in the process of burglarizing a crony's homestead, Joey flees into a nearby cemetery where he (literally) stumbles upon Mona (Beals), a semi-psycho punk rock cabaret singer currently in the process of committing suicide..."

Horseplayer
A psycho-thriller with a creepy enough cast and featured music by the Pixies....
Film Review  September 27, 1991, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...Harris, Max Perlich and Vic Tayback. A psycho-thriller with a creepy enough cast and featured music by the Pixies...."

Servants of Twilight
While not as awful as the last film adaptation of a Dean Koontz novel (the evil Corey Haim vehicle Watchers), Servants is a far cry from what it could have...
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Film Review  June 7, 1991, by Marc Savlov
"...Unfortunately, though, they've also managed to delete almost all of the necessary background stories that kept the original story moving along at its frenetic (if sometimes unbelievable) pace. Where did these psycho holy rollers come from, and how come it's so easy for them to pinpoint the mother and child's location at any given moment? I don't know, and neither does anyone else, I suspect..."

The Paramount Theatre Summer Film Classics
Screens Story  June 3, 1999
"...8/20 7:30Psycho 9:45Psycho..."

A Tall Drink of Water
Stars we love at the Paramount Summer Classic Film series
Screens Story  May 15, 2014, by Alejandro Puyana
"...But when the Master of Suspense gave him the role of the deranged motel owner Norman Bates and told him, "You are the film," Perkins had no idea how to take it. He hadn't read the script for Psycho, and Hitchcock had bought up most copies of the novel it was based on in order to prevent the surprise ending from getting out...."

AFF: The Wackness
AFF film review Psycho Sleepover
DAILY Screens  October 19, 2008, by Marc Savlov
"...Maybe we're spoiled, maybe we're jaded, maybe we're just coming down from our Fantastic Fest high, but we gotta say AFF "Comedy Vanguard" selection Psycho Sleepover is crazy bad. Not so-bad-it's-good bad, just, you know, the other kind..."

P2
Horror overtakes a woman on level P2 of a parking garage, and the film's suspense plays on our collective unease with being alone, at night, surrounded by concrete and rebar.
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Film Review  November 16, 2007, by Marc Savlov
"...Starring: Rachel Nichols, Wes Bentley and Simon Reynolds. There's a moment early on in this minimalist horror film that pays homage to Hitchcock's Psycho, and, more specifically, to Norman Bates' awkward, oddly touching attempt to establish some sort of empathy between himself and victim-to-be Marion Crane..."

Thr3e
A Christian psychological horror thriller based on a novel by bestselling Christian author Ted Dekker, Thr3e nevertheless adopts the extreme-horror tactics currently in vogue in movies such as the Saw continuum.
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Film Review  January 5, 2007, by Marjorie Baumgarten
"...Here's a conundrum: How does one make a Christian horror movie? Sure, it's possible to eliminate the drugs, nudity, and bad language so common in our popular entertainment – and maybe even some of the immoral behaviors. But doesn't the crux of a horror movie usually require some psycho baddie to disrupt the calm of normalcy? Is turning the other cheek a useful tactic to ward off unsavory malevolents and murderous nut jobs? Thr3e, a Christian psychological horror thriller, wants to take on the challenge..."

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning
In this prequel to the original Chainsaw, we learn how Leatherface grew up to become a monster.
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Film Review  October 13, 2006, by Marc Savlov
"...Origin stories are difficult and none more so than those peculiar to the horror genre. Mick Garris' 1990 offering Psycho IV: The Beginning (which had the added benefit of being scripted by original Psycho scribe Joseph Stefano, who sadly passed beyond the outer limits last month), was a lackluster affair, and in recent memory only Wes Craven's child-killing dream-reaper Freddy Krueger had a backstory with enough sordid squeals to lodge any more firmly in the mind's eye than an errant eyelash..."

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