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1-6 of 6 results for flavonoids

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To Your Health
I want to try supplementing with quercetin to help my allergies. How much should I take?
Columns  October 24, 2003, by James Heffley, Ph.D.
"...A. Quercetin is one of a great number (5,000 or more) of water-soluble plant pigments called flavonoids that provide much of the flavor and color in fruits and vegetables..."

To Your Health
Are tannins responsible for the heart-healthy benefits of drinking wine?
Columns  September 23, 2005, by James Heffley, Ph.D.
"...Tannins will indeed constrict blood vessels, but our 5,000-year history of drinking wine and tea, both of which are high in tannins, is testimony that ill effects are outweighed by benefits. "Proanthocyanidins" are among the substances labeled as "tannins." Proanthocyanidins are simply several molecules of the phytochemicals that we call flavonoids joined together..."

Elemental Chocolates
Food Story  February 8, 2008, by Mick Vann
"...This isn't smooth and slippery chocolate like you're used to; it has some texture to it and is completely vegan. And since there's no heat-processing involved, all of the health benefits from the flavonoids and antioxidants are intact...."

To Your Health
Useful tips in avoiding lung cancer for smokers and nonsmokers alike
Columns  March 17, 2006, by James Heffley, Ph.D.
"...A diet rich in fruits and leafy green vegetables helps. These are good sources of vitamin A and carotenoids, phytochemicals such as flavonoids, and folic acid, which are all protective against cancer..."

To Your Health
I know MRIs are useful in diagnosis, but I'm concerned about the possible side effects. Would a CT scan have fewer side effects?
Columns  November 28, 2003, by James Heffley, Ph.D.
"...Supplements of vitamin E, vitamin C, and a host of other antioxidants have been well documented to reduce this risk. Vitamin E specifically protects DNA from radiation damage, but bear in mind that antioxidants work much better as a team, so adding vitamin C, selenium, flavonoids, and perhaps other antioxidants is well worthwhile..."

To Your Health
Where else can a teetotaler get the benefits of red wine?
Columns  January 25, 2002, by James Heffley, Ph.D.
"...Red wine contains a class of flavonoids called "oligomeric proanthocyanidins" or, due to this awkward name, OPCs. These are credited with increasing the good HDL cholesterol and may also inhibit the production of a peptide called endothelin-1, which is a potent blood vessel constrictor..."

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