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Generic Ensemble Company’s Collection
GenEnCo uses an eclectic mix of objects to explore how relics of relationships past keep us connected to love
Arts Review  August 31, 2017, by Robert Faires
"...The random variety of the objects amid the materials supporting them suggest a neglected attic in slow-motion collapse. But in the brief time it takes for the five performers in this Generic Ensemble Company production to present this work, we learn that these disparate articles share something in common – something precious, in fact: All are relics of relationships past, souvenirs of a time – perhaps only a moment – when two hearts connected...."

Robin Hood: An Elegy
Rough edges aside, Generic Ensemble Company's new work makes an urgent statement that #blacklivesmatter
Arts Review  August 13, 2015, by Elizabeth Cobbe
"...Generic Ensemble Company has created this work at a critical yet challenging time, as the deaths of black men and women at the hands of police are in the headlines and many stories about them are being told for the first time. To be relevant, theatre artists should participate in this conversation, and the artists involved in Robin Hood do so..."

GenEnCo's The Mikado: Reclaimed
In this newly devised work, Asian-American artists grapple with the complicated legacy of Gilbert & Sullivan's opera
Arts Story  February 11, 2016, by Rosalind Faires
"...More than a century of appropriation and exclusion later, Austin's Generic Ensemble Company (GenEnCo) is taking Gilbert and Sullivan's text and reforming it to serve the Asian-American community. The Mikado: Reclaimed, opening this week at the Vortex, is the second of what will likely be a trilogy of new play adaptations to speak to the immediate political moment and the needs of the Austin community..."

Getting Political With The Tree Play and Robin Hood: An Elegy
Two new Austin plays tackle timely subjects
Arts Story  August 6, 2015, by Robert Faires
"...Running Aug. 7-22, this work by the Generic Ensemble Company, aka GenEnCo, uses the familiar myth of the Sherwood Forest outlaw to confront state-sanctioned racism and violence against black people in both Robin's time and ours..."

Zeus in Therapy
Tutto Theatre's stage adaptation of Douglass Stott Parker's poetry is less a play than a cool presentation of poems
Arts Review  August 23, 2013, by Elizabeth Cobbe
"...Tutto Theatre Company has assembled an excellent cast of performers for this show. They work beautifully as an ensemble, to the extent that highlighting any one actor's performance is almost a shame, because all of them have great moments..."

Film Reviews
Recommended
  August 18, 1995
"...BABED: Chris Noonan; with James Cromwell, Magda Szubanski. Perhaps one of the cutest children's films ever made, this tale of the young piglet named Babe who decides his calling in life is to be a sheepdog is also a rousing comedy appropriately filled with a variety of subtle messages, from self empowerment to the importance of treating others as equals, even though they may be, ah, sheep. Produced by the Australian company Kennedy Miller (oddly enough, the same company which produced the hyper-violent Mad Max series) and directed by newcomer Chris Noonan, Babe is one of those movies that makes you positively melt from its guileless charm (never have I heard so many otherwise rational adults succumb to the "ooohs" and "ahhhs" usually reserved for infants encountering their first kaleidescope) without making you feel like a twit..."

Film Reviews
Recommended
  August 11, 1995
"...BABED: Chris Noonan; with James Cromwell, Magda Szubanski. Perhaps one of the cutest children's films ever made, this tale of the young piglet named Babe who decides his calling in life is to be a sheepdog is also a rousing comedy appropriately filled with a variety of subtle messages, from self empowerment to the importance of treating others as equals, even though they may be, ah, sheep. Produced by the Australian company Kennedy Miller (oddly enough, the same company which produced the hyper-violent Mad Max series) and directed by newcomer Chris Noonan, Babe is one of those movies that makes you positively melt from its guileless charm (never have I heard so many otherwise rational adults succumb to the "ooohs" and "ahhhs" usually reserved for infants encountering their first kaleidescope) without making you feel like a twit..."

Film
Recommended
  June 2, 1995
"...But let's cut to the chase, shall we? The only real reason anyone is going to see Casper is for its special effects sequences, which, thankfully, are both spectacular and frequent, though lacking the same jaw-dropping sense of wonder that audiences felt when they saw such milestones as Jurassic Park's dinosaurs or the water tentacle from The Abyss. In the end, if you're looking for mindless entertainment that might keep the kids busy for a couple of hours, the effects-filled Casper will probably fit the bill, but if you want a real story, real characters, or - let's just say it - a really good family movie, don't get lost in the Spielberg hype machine (Spielberg and his company Amblin produced Casper) and forget about a movie called A Little Princess. 2.0 stars (J.O.) Great Hills, Lake Creek, Lincoln, Movies 12, Northcross, Riverside, Roundrock, Westgate..."

Film Reviews
Recommended
News Story  November 17, 1995
"...Get Shorty creates its own distinct rhythm that, takes a few sequences to adjust to and, perhaps, is a bit too slow overall. One thing is certain: Danny DeVito's production company Jersey Films is turning into a major industry force..."

Film Reviews
Recommended
  August 25, 1995
"...BABED: Chris Noonan; with James Cromwell, Magda Szubanski. Perhaps one of the cutest children's films ever made, this tale of the young piglet named Babe who decides his calling in life is to be a sheepdog is also a rousing comedy appropriately filled with a variety of subtle messages, from self empowerment to the importance of treating others as equals, even though they may be, ah, sheep. Produced by the Australian company Kennedy Miller (oddly enough, the same company which produced the hyper-violent Mad Max series) and directed by newcomer Chris Noonan, Babe is one of those movies that makes you positively melt from its guileless charm (never have I heard so many otherwise rational adults succumb to the "ooohs" and "ahhhs" usually reserved for infants encountering their first kaleidescope) without making you feel like a twit..."

Film Reviews
Recommended
  August 4, 1995
"...HONG KONG GRAFFITID: Lo Pan; with Cheng Ka Win, Tai Pic, Lo Pan. This 1995 Hong Kong film kicks off The New Far Eastern Film Series sponsored by the Cinema Differentia Company and the Dobie Theatre..."

Film
Recommended
  June 9, 1995
"...But let's cut to the chase, shall we? The only real reason anyone is going to see Casper is for its special effects sequences, which, thankfully, are both spectacular and frequent, though lacking the same jaw-dropping sense of wonder that audiences felt when they saw such milestones as Jurassic Park's dinosaurs or the water tentacle from The Abyss. In the end, if you're looking for mindless entertainment that might keep the kids busy for a couple of hours, the effects-filled Casper will probably fit the bill, but if you want a real story, real characters, or - let's just say it - a really good family movie, don't get lost in the Spielberg hype machine (Spielberg and his company Amblin produced Casper) and forget about a movie called A Little Princess. 2.0 stars (J.O.) Great Hills, Lake Creek, Lincoln, Movies 12, Northcross, Riverside, Roundrock, Westgate..."

Film Reviews
Recommended
News Story  November 3, 1995
"...NEVER TALK TO STRANGERSD: Peter Hall; with Rebecca De Mornay, Antonio Banderas, Dennis Miller, Len Cariou, Beau Starr, Tim Kelleher, Eugene Lipinski, Harry Dean Stanton. (R, 102 min.) Never Talk to Strangers is a Brian DePalma film without the benefit of Brian DePalma. Coming from the ridiculously talented founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Peter Hall, this "psychological murder mystery" starts out awful and goes downhill from there, piling on the obvious like so many dead bodies and battering its audience about the face and neck with needless exposition and glaringly silly flashbacks..."

Film Reviews
Recommended
News Story  October 27, 1995
"...NEVER TALK TO STRANGERSD: Peter Hall; with Rebecca De Mornay, Antonio Banderas, Dennis Miller, Len Cariou, Beau Starr, Tim Kelleher, Eugene Lipinski, Harry Dean Stanton. (R, 102 min.) Never Talk to Strangers is a Brian DePalma film without the benefit of Brian DePalma. Coming from the ridiculously talented founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Peter Hall, this "psychological murder mystery" starts out awful and goes downhill from there, piling on the obvious like so many dead bodies and battering its audience about the face and neck with needless exposition and glaringly silly flashbacks..."

Film
Recommended
  May 19, 1995
"...Simon's first move leaves the blurry-eyed, recently awakened cop wandering around central Harlem wearing a sandwich board emblazoned with a racist slogan guaranteed to render him deceased within in a matter of minutes. To his aid comes shop owner and reluctant sidekick-to-be Zeus Carver (Jackson), who saves McClane's life not because he's a good Samaritan, but because "one dead white cop in Harlem suddenly means hundreds more with itchy trigger fingers." While the two run around the city on various wild goose chases designed to get them killed, the FBI and Company gamely try to figure out who's behind all this McClane-directed violence that's making New York even more hazardous than usual (which should be fairly obvious from the film's title)..."

Film
Recommended
  May 26, 1995
"...Simon's first move leaves the blurry-eyed, recently awakened cop wandering around central Harlem wearing a sandwich board emblazoned with a racist slogan guaranteed to render him deceased within in a matter of minutes. To his aid comes shop owner and reluctant sidekick-to-be Zeus Carver (Jackson), who saves McClane's life not because he's a good Samaritan, but because "one dead white cop in Harlem suddenly means hundreds more with itchy trigger fingers." While the two run around the city on various wild-goose chases designed to get them killed, the FBI and Company gamely try to figure out who's behind all this McClane-directed violence that's making New York even more hazardous than usual (which should be fairly obvious from the film's title)..."

Box Sets
Herbie Hancock
Music Story  December 11, 1998
"...And since 25 Years doesn't include works by Walser, Zappa, Ra, Armatrading, or Hendrix, one has to wonder what else missed the cut; some will complain that 25 Years doesn't contain enough from their recent, soul-stirring Early Music (Lachrymae Antiquae) or their highly successful Pieces of Africa, but such critiques miss the point. 25 Years is an overview of the quartet's prodigious and diverse career, not another valueless record company "Best of" compilation, and this highlighting of the classic works of the manifold Kronos repertoire (including over two hours of new recordings, available only in this box set) will take a lifetime to digest and enjoy..."

The Summer Revival Spirit
Can I Get a Witness?
Screens Story  June 12, 1998
"...The complete schedules for all three film series can also be found in this section. The abbreviations that accompany each movie capsule are as follows: PAR (Paramount Summer Classics), AFS (Austin Film Society), and SP (Summer Splash Parties)..."

Live Shots
Music Story  April 24, 1998
"...Where the heck were you people? The Herb Fest over in Fredricksburg? The wildflower thingy at Lady Bird's research center? Or perhaps you were gearing up your goldfish for the Pet Parade over at Hancock center. Maybe the alt.country crowd just ain't that outdoorsy, because really, who would want to sit around outside, far removed from traffic and or any other urban irritant, on an absolutely gorgeous Saturday afternoon? It's not like the music wasn't worth the trip: Slobberbone doing their best hick Bad Company impersonation; Six String Drag's jangled set, spiked with an affable cover of "Adios Mexico"; the Gourds' typically spirited display of redneck reverie hardly hampered by technical snafus..."

Film Reviews
Recommended
News Story  September 29, 1995
"...While it's more or less acknowledged that in Chinese martial arts movies the plot is usually secondary to the physical action, there are a couple of moments in The Snake in the Eagle's Shadow that are a little too goofy for even my tastes - like when the comic-relief preacher (Horan) turns out, in the film's final reel, to be a master fighter from Russia. However, despite its faults, Yuen Woo-ping and company do manage to pull off a number of thrilling fight scenes and memorable moments of physical comedy, and it is for these reasons that the picture is so fondly remembered by fans..."

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