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Performer Match: Table Manners Crew

1-20 of 41 results for Buffy Manners

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She Stoops to Conquer
Austin Playhouse brought out the impudence of this comedy of manners through a shared vision of sincere simplicity
Arts Review  March 12, 2015, by Adam Roberts
"..."Impudence." It's a word that's thrown around a lot in Oliver Goldsmith's 1773 play She Stoops to Conquer. But this is not an uncommon theme in comedies of manners, which one could easily argue is the most fitting generic classification for this play..."

Payne Pleasures 2005
Drama with a Gothic flair scored high in the nominations for the 2005 B. Iden Payne Awards, as announced by Austin Circle of Theatres on August 15
Arts Story  August 19, 2005, by Robert Faires
"...The Zachary Scott Theatre Center's staging of Crowns was recognized seven times (for Outstanding Production of Music Theater, Dave Steakley's direction, Allen Robertson's musical direction, Jason Amato's lighting design, and the performances of Jacqui Cross, Tim Curry, and Janis Stinson). Garnering six nods each were Zach's version of the 9/11 drama Omnium-Gatherum (nominated for Outstanding Drama, Steakley's direction, Amato's lighting, Robertson's sound, and the performances of Janelle Buchanan and Helen Merino) and the Austin Shakespeare Festival's latest take on A Midsummer Night's Dream (nominated for Outstanding Comedy and the work of directors Guy Roberts and Ian Manners, costume designer Buffy Manners, sound designer Phillip Montoya, and actors Corey Gagne and Jill Blackwood)..."

The Explorers Club
Austin Playhouse's sublimely silly satire of Victorian pomposity ventures where other comedies fear to tread
Arts Review  April 21, 2016, by Shanon Weaver
"...Zac Thomas furthers the introspection as Beebe, an explorer thought dead by his companions, who has returned from captivity among monks of an undisclosed martial art. Where Luigi represents "othering," Beebe goes full Orientalism in a strange hat and robes (among the many perfect costumes by Buffy Manners), leading an unseen army with guttural grunts, leaping about the stage in a nearly acrobatic fighting fashion..."

Satchel Paige and the Kansas City Swing
The script for this baseball play is a bit wobbly, but Austin Playhouse fields a strong production for the win
Arts Review  February 25, 2016, by Shanon Weaver
"...Disjointed though the play may be, Austin Playhouse Producing Artistic Director Don Toner focuses on its strengths and turns a bunt into a double with some strong performances, giving us what I imagine is the best possible production of a play that could use some more time in the farm system. Buffy Manners' costumes are perfect, and the set is an interesting mix of physical elements and digital projection, used to great effect by designer Mike Toner and sound/video designer Joel Mercado-See..."

Austin Playhouse's The Philadelphia Story
Don Toner's direction and a top-drawer cast make for a riotous evening in this version of Philip Barry's crisp comedy
Arts Review  December 10, 2015, by Shanon Weaver
"...Tracy's first husband is played by Jason Newman, who exhibits a strength that comes from genuine affection wrapped in cockiness. Michael Stuart is hilarious as Uncle Willy, sporting a referenced toupee by costume designer Buffy Manners, who drapes every actor in both character- and period-perfect attire..."

Austin Playhouse's The Real Thing
Tom Stoppard's play receives a remarkable revival with a seasoned cast
Arts Review  September 24, 2015, by Shanon Weaver
"...Although watching the stagehands Tetris the space into new locales is fascinating, it does draw one out of the story a bit – but as soon as Don Day's magnificent lighting comes up, the actors pull us right back in. Legendary costumer Buffy Manners drapes her actors to match their station, most notably removing the wig Osborn dons for the first act in favor of her natural, badass, pixie-esque hair for the second..."

The Tree Play
For this story of a rain forest over a lifetime, Robi Polgar created a living, breathing poem
Arts Review  August 13, 2015, by Shanon Weaver
"...The lighting, by Jennifer Rogers, appropriately captured the sun's struggle to pierce the dense growth around us, making each ray of light a gift. Buffy Manners' costumes worked very well, particularly for those actors portraying trees – part human, part spirit, part nature, each with its own identity and soul...."

Chicago
A cast of familiar faces conjures Kander and Ebb's Jazz Age classic in an entertaining way
Arts Review  June 25, 2015, by Elissa Russell
"...Lyn Koenning's musical direction and Buffy Manners' costumes punch up the razzle-dazzle and bring the audience back to the Jazz Age. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said of Desiderio Roybal's set design or Don Day's lighting, both of which are far too minimalistic for a play that requires a high level of showmanship..."

Lady Windermere's Fan
Austin Playhouse's take on this Oscar Wilde treat is straightforward and buoyed by terrific performances
Arts Review  March 22, 2013, by Jillian Owens
"...The production has minor flaws: Some of Buffy Manners' costumes are graceful, but others are mismatched; razor-edge humor occasionally gets lost in overacting; and the storefront's air-conditioner drowns out Bryan Schneider's sound. This Lady Windermere's Fan feels more like a cupcake than a petit four: the icing is a little rough around the edges..."

Measure for Measure
Mary Moody Northen Theatre delivers a colorful version of Shakespeare's grayscale comedy that's worth seeing
Arts Review  February 22, 2013, by Jillian Owens
"...Kathryn Eader's magical lighting brings oranges, purples, and greens into the picture. And Buffy Manners' hip costumes outfit the morally ambiguous supporting characters Lucio, Pompey, and Mistress Overdone in pinks, reds, and yellows..."

Boeing-Boeing
Austin Playhouse succeeds in booking a funny flight to Madcap Farce City
Arts Review  February 17, 2012, by Adam Roberts
"...Though the plot itself is rather stock in nature, Toner and his cast do a commendable job of utilizing devices like heightened physical comedy (think slapstick), Laugh-In-style door play for near-misses and close calls, and lots of furniture acrobatics to bring the sometimes-too-predictable script to life. Buffy Manners' excellent and colorful costumes likewise heighten each character individually but also unify the whole, providing an especially fun palette while contributing generously to the storytelling with flair...."

Playing 'House' (and 'Garden')
At Austin Playhouse, running Alan Ayckbourn's paired comedies side-by-side is double the pleasure, double the fun
Arts Story  February 3, 2006, by Robert Faires
"...Toner might never have considered producing any of Ayckbourn's almost six dozen plays – more dramas than Neil Simon and Bill Shakespeare combined, the director jokes – but when surveys of the Austin Playhouse audience indicated that Ayckbourn was a writer they were interested in, Toner thought he ought to give the plays a look. At the suggestion of costume designer Buffy Manners, he read House and Garden and, to his surprise, loved them..."

A Christmas Carol
The State Theater Company brings its artistry to bear on that most conventional show of the season, 'A Christmas Carol,' and delivers a perfectly packaged production
Arts Review  December 16, 2005, by Patti Hadad
"...This is essentially the same version that the State produced last December, with an adaptation by British playwright Neil Bartlett, set by David Potts, costumes by Buffy Manners, and sound by the Gunn Brothers, but it's a perfectly packaged production. Bartlett's adaptation doffs its hat to the text of Charles Dickens' 1843 novella, entertaining us with that familiar Victorian style and charm as well as ringing heavily with favorite carols...."

A Man for All Seasons
In Austin Playhouse's 'A Man for All Seasons,' David Stahl's immaculate Sir Thomas More stands his moral ground with humility, humor, and insight
Arts Review  October 21, 2005, by Patti Hadad
"...Haddock), More's wife, Alice (Janet Hurley Kimlicko), and daughter Margaret (Lara Toner). They are dressed for refinement; Buffy Manners' ornate Tudor costumes, heavy with velvets, bullion, and coifs, put the characters decorously in the 16th century and upstage the less noble gray set...."

Austin Critics Table Nominations, 2002-2003
The full list of nominations for the 2002-2003 Austin Critics Table Awards, recognizing outstanding achievements in local theatre, dance, classical music, and visual art
Arts Story  May 9, 2003, by Robert Faires
"...Buffy Manners, Henry V/The Merry Wives of Windsor/Mrs. Warren's Profession..."

Mrs. Warren's Profession
The State Theater Company's scintillating revival of Mrs. Warren's Profession moves George Bernard Shaw's characters beyond the politics for which they serve as mouthpieces and fills them with the breaths and gestures and expressions of people who live.
Arts Review  March 28, 2003, by Robert Faires
"...The production is lovely -- with Buffy Manners' sumptuous period costumes, Tony Tucci's handsome lighting, and Christopher McCollum's elegant set making a picture almost as pretty as Ford Madox Brown's painting -- but what Kanoff and his sterling production team do is something more than please the eye; they prick the mind and heart. They make things matter...."

The Merry Wives of Windsor
Stuffed to bursting with outrageous characters, broad reactions, and slapstick, The Merry Wives of Windsor as mounted by the Austin Shakespeare Festival and Austin Playhouse is big on big comedy, and the crisp comic work of the cast makes it a sizable pleasure.
Arts Review  January 24, 2003, by Robert Faires
"...This great tub of a man sees himself as a chick magnet, a world-class seducer, a hunka hunka burnin' love who can woo two wives at once with neither the wiser. Who else has that kind of charisma and sexual prowess but Elvis? In this guise (realized in gloriously appalling fashion by costumer Buffy Manners), we can immediately see that his ego matches his girth, and he's headed for a big fall...."

Twelfth Night
The latest production of Twelfth Night from the Austin Shakespeare Festival is full of such strange staging, acting, set, costumes, and sound that viewers end up with less a romantic comedy and more a mass of whirling, flailing confusion.
Arts Review  September 20, 2002, by Barry Pineo
"...Mixed into the action were modern pop songs that I believe were meant to comment cleverly on it, but these also added only time. (That these songs were some of the more polished pieces in the show is unfortunate, since the actors stumbled over Shakespeare's text more than a few times.) While Buffy Manners' costumes mixed pre-modern and modern silhouettes to interesting effect, the colors didn't add up to any consistent palette..."

The Seagull
In the Austin Playhouse production of The Seagull, actors Christa Kimlicko Jones and David Stahl create a splendid tension between their characters and between art and life, but most of the rest of the production rolls by languidly, as just another visit with a crew of Chekhov's discontented Russians.
Arts Review  January 18, 2002, by Robert Faires
"...It may be that the actors are so deep in playing the self-absorption of these characters that they aren't making the kind of connections with each other that develops a tension between characters and a palpable sense of community among them. Watching them in this autumnal setting -- Don Toner has built a set with tall, elegant archways like bare trees and accent strips patterned with leaves, and Buffy Manners has costumed the cast in sand, khaki, tan, and other shades of brown, accented with pale olives, roses, and mauves, like dried blossoms saved from the frost and pressed into the pages of a book -- you might think these figures were fallen leaves themselves, dropped away from the tree that bound them as one and now just single things, apart from everything else...."

Alone Again, Unnaturally
The isolation of the lighthouse-bound old couple in Ionesco's The Chairs is supposed to be shattering, but while there are some startling images in the State Theater Company's polished and professional production, the terror of being alone takes a back seat to an effort to play the script's comedy.
Arts Story  July 27, 2001, by Barry Pineo
"...After we first see the old man (portrayed with almost manic energy by Jaston Williams), an old woman (played by Karen Jones, matching Williams mania for mania) almost immediately appears on the scene, drawing him away from the window and down into the large room. Both are dressed in baggy, shabby, long-worn clothes provided by designer Buffy Manners, their long gray hair hanging in their faces..."

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