Need to Work on Health Insurance by Exploring Options: First We Dismiss Expanding Government Programs

RECEIVED Tue., July 19, 2005

Dear Editor,
    After reading an archived article regarding health insurance in Texas it seems that a solution will never be reached if fingers continually are pointed at everyone else. The problem with a lack of health insurance cannot be placed completely on the insurance companies. Picture the situation as interlocking circles between the insurance companies, Texas citizens, health care providers, and legislators.
    Health care providers are trying to provide adequate care while working within strict guidelines. “Physicians provided an estimated $914 million, or 19 percent, of all charity care delivered in fiscal 1998” (Window on State Government, 1998).
    Insurance companies are trying to make money while holding health care providers accountable to performing only necessary procedures. Texas citizens are in need of adequate health care and have a hard time receiving it due to no health insurance for a variety of reasons. Some cannot afford it, some do not qualify, some have not gained citizenship, some simply do not know how to apply, and many are not employed at a job that provides benefits.
    Budget cuts certainly do not help the issue but why wait until everyone will agree on the “perfect” legislation? Holding separate beliefs and opinions is one reason we are proud to be Americans. Instead, let us inform legislators of the needs and work within the system rather than against it to create change rather than just wait for it.
    Devon M. Herrick from the National Center for Policy Analysis presented "Five Myths About the Uninsured in America" (2000). Myth 4 states: “The ranks of the uninsured can be reduced by expanding government programs.” Simply expanding government aid has been ineffective in the past, he presents, and has even exacerbated the existing problem.
    A real solution will only be reached when we stop placing blame and begin to work together to elicit change.
Rachel Cook
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