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for Sat., March 2
Recommended
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Hedwig and the Angry Inch

    Director Dave Steakley and choreographer Abe Reybold bring John Cameron Mitchell’s glamorous and rockin’ musical classic about ”a fourth-wall-smashing East German rock & roll goddess who also happens to be the victim of a botched sex-change operation, trying to find a place to belong in America” – of course – back to the Austin stage. And here’s Robert Faires’ review of the whole thing.
    Through March 3. Wed.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sat.-Sun., 2:30pm. $30-165.  
  • Film

    Special Screenings

    Life and Nothing More (2017)

    Best of the Fests: This award winner is a striking picture of African-American working-class life.
    Sat., March 2, 3:15  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Austin Forging Competition

    This fourth annual event is a collaboration between local blacksmithing shop Austin Metal Authority and the Community Forge at Mobile Loaves and Fishes Community First! Village. Watch artist blacksmiths from all over the USA battle with metal, might, and imagination in the only competition of its kind in the country. Bonus: Live music, ironmongers market, and more.
    Sat., March 2, 9am-6pm. $5-10.  
  • Community

    Events

    Austin Parks Foundation's It's My Park Day

    Get in on this day of park appreciation by joining or leading a park cleanup project. Go online for a list of current cleanup sites, or register to start your own with a group of friends or neighbors. Kid-friendly opportunities are available.
    Sat., March 2, 9am-1pm. Free.  
  • Film

    Special Screenings

    Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour

    Whole Earth Provision Co.: Some of the year's most inspiring action, environmental, and adventure films from the festival are featured over two days. Proceeds benefit the Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept.
    Sat.-Sun., March 2-3  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Blackfeather Vintage: Kingdom

    This is a royal show, to be sure, but the kingdom of note here is the eukaryotic kingdom of fungi – as Flip Solomon reveals her newest works featuring mushrooms. Three large originals center this exhibition, accompanied by many prints and a graphically rich extension of Solomon's line of clothing. Bonus: Ask owner Jessica Nieri about the special cocktail she's whipping up for this event.
    Reception: Sat., March 2, 4-7pm
  • Music

    Brandon Hughes, South Austin Moonlighters, Radney Foster, Folk Uke, Guitar Grady (3:00)

    Radney Foster shows off his country hits. The Texas native continues expanding his talent behind intimate 2017 book/LP combo For You to See the Stars.
    Sat., March 2
  • Qmmunity

    Community

    Community Healing QPOC Health Fair

    Join allgo for their third annual health hootenanny with QPOC healers, providers, community members, plus links to services, classes, and fun swag.
    Sat., March 2, 1-5pm. Free.  
  • Community

    Events

    Elisabet Ney's Nature Day

    Celebrate Austin’s diverse flora and fauna with bird counts, hands-on projects, interactive demonstrations, and more. You'll also discover local environmental outreach programs, wildlife rescue, and science education opportunities here today.
    Sat., March 2, 1-4pm  
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Emo Philips

    This man needs no introduction. We mean, he got one decades ago, when he introduced himself to the world – and the world hasn't been quite the same since. It's been laughing a lot more, for one thing. And we're sure Philips is gonna keep it laughing until everything goes ker-blooooey. [Note: only approximate transliteration of apocalyptic sound.]
    Feb. 28-March 2. Thu., 8pm; Fri-Sat., 7:30 & 10pm. $14-23.  
  • Community

    Events

    Explore UT Open House

    You know that big school in the middle of our city? Maybe you should get to know it better. The entire campus will be rife with activities, music, tours, and more for kids and adults. No registration is needed for most events. Go online for a list.
    Sat., March 2, 11am-5pm. Free.
  • Music

    G.O.M.E.Z., Bum Out, Gentlemen Rogues

    For six months, north of the Drag, venerable pizza joint the Parlor has quietly returned to its roots serving up punk rock alongside slices, via a series of Saturday afternoon matinees. It’s steadily built a scene-within-the-scene, presenting a well-curated mix of old and new bands. This show hosts a one-day-only reunion of Nineties Kiss-and-Star-Wars-loving punks G.O.M.E.Z. (spelling courtesy of legal mandate) alongside power-pop brutarians Gentlemen Rogues and neo-emoists Bum Out.
    Sat., March 2, 4pm
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Indian Ink

    Austin Shakespeare brings Tom Stoppard’s delightful cross-cultural play – the story of a rebellious poet who has her portrait painted by a mysterious artist while traveling in India – to life onstage, featuring Babs George, Jill Blackwood, Tamil Periasamy, Sanjay Rao, Colum Morgan, and more. Directed by Ann Ciccolella, with music by Nagavalli.
    Through March 3. Wed.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sun., 3pm. $18-46.  
  • Arts

    Books

    James Haley: The Handy Texas Answer Book

    Awwww, hell yeah! This book is like "Everything You Always Wanted To Know About the Lone Star State … But Were Too Busy Swillin' Queso To Ask." For true, citizen: author Haley's presenting a volume of much veracious Texas volubility here tonight.
    Sat., March 2, 5pm
  • Music

    Löwin (album release), Blushing, Fanclub, All Eyes

    Löwin’s excellent sophomore effort, Heavy as the Sun, veers surprisingly into synth-pop territory, the fourpiece levitating a lighter sound thanks to Sara Houser’s return to keyboards and airy vocals. The pop glimmer easily collides with the band’s background in rollicking, bluesy rock. Support includes quintet All Eyes blending off-kilter dance beats with funk punches, while Fanclub trios twee, indie-pop earworms. Blushing’s dark shoegaze deluges last.
    Sat., March 2, 9pm
  • Music

    Mardi Gras weekend w/ Betty Harris, Peterson Brothers

    Betty Harris kicks off Mardi Gras with an encore performance of last year’s two-night stand at Antone’s. Nicknamed the Lost Queen of New Orleans Soul and associated with late producer-pianist Allen Toussaint, you’d be forgiven for thinking the 80-year-old diva hails from the Big Easy.: “Oh, no,” she clarified by phone from her home in Connecticut last year. “I was in New Orleans about a month, but that’s the longest I’ve ever been there.”: Harris grew up in Florida and Alabama surrounded by music, her father promoting gospel artists including Sam Cooke & the Soul Stirrers, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, the Dixie Hummingbirds, and Caravans. She considers herself most fortunate to have spent a good amount of time around Tharpe, “who was actually playing rock & roll but nobody knew it!” Another giant of the genre mentored Harris after she moved to NYC in the early Sixties.: “I had such a huge set of lungs that I really didn’t know where I belonged until I met Big Maybelle,” she said. “I went to her when she was playing the Apollo and she helped me find my own style, my own voice, my own sound.”: Harris cracked the R&B Top 10 in 1963 with a syrupy slow take on Solomon Burke’s “Cry to Me.” The second half of the decade found her jetting to New Orleans for sessions with Toussaint and a rhythm section that soon became the Meters. The sessions proved tumultuous but the results – searing ballads (“Nearer to You”) and furious funk (“There’s a Break in the Road”) – remain thrilling to this day.: “Allen was young, I was young. We clashed some, but I had a definite respect for his work. There was some childish stuff, but along with the Meters, we came out with some gorgeous songs.”
    Sat., March 2, 9pm
  • Music

    Metric, Zoé, July Talk

    Toronto New Wave vs. Mexican rock.
    Sat., March 2, 7pm
  • Music

    Project ATX6

    This year, roving documentary series Project ATX6 delivered six Austin acts to festivals in Nova Scotia, Hanoi, and Montreal. Propelled by founder Chris Brecht, the handpicked talents of Michael Booher, Carrie Fussell (Calliope Musicals), Jacob Alan Jaeger, Nnedi Nebula (Trouble in the Streets), Georgia Parker (Big Cedar Fever), and Cory Reinisch (Harvest Thieves) celebrate their homecoming with a big finale. KUTX’s Laurie Gallardo and Tate Landon Mayeux of Mayeux & Broussard host footage from the road alongside full-band performances.
    Sat., March 2, 8pm
  • Qmmunity

    Nightlife & Parties

    Service x Gear Night

    Bring that daddy drama to the disco for an epic battle between Austin Gears and Service with Mouthfeel and Chorizo Funk. Get it, daddy-o.
    Sat., March 2, 9pm  
  • Music

    Stephen Marley (acoustic), Mobley

    After a slew of acoustic performances, Grammy-winning reggae scion Stephen Marley released the self-explanatory One Take: Acoustic Jams last October. His first album since 2016, the collection finds him performing both lead vocals and percussion, an unsurprising feat given Marley’s production history. The melody maker’s as much an MC as Jamaican crooner.
    Sat., March 2, 6pm
  • Film

    Special Screenings

    The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

    The big screen is the place to see this widescreen epic about British soldiers, interned in a Japanese prison camp, who build the titular bridge as a morale-boosting exercise. A winner of seven Oscars, including Best Picture.
    Sat., March 2, 12:00  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Rover

    Scandalous! Lewd! Morally depraved! The acclaimed Hidden Room Theatre company presents this rarely performed delight from 1677 through the lens of “a few very special teen films of 1983.” (Think: Valley Girl.) So, if you’re looking for a mash-up of Restoration/New Romantic proto-feminist sexploitation complete with swashbuckling sword fights, forbidden romance, masked revelers, and bitchin’ live music, then pop your ruffled collar and behold Aphra Behn’s transgressive romp. Directed by Beth Burns and featuring a cast whose diverse talents will thrill your senses.
    Through March 3. Fri.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. Extra shows: Wed.-Thu., Feb. 27-28, 8pm. $17-35.  
  • Music

    The Zombies, Liz Brasher [outside]

    Rod Argent and Colin Blunstone still lead St. Albans’ original.
    Sat., March 2, 9pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Deconstructing Nostalgia

    Elizabeth Chapin’s work references her Southern upbringing and the conflicted nostalgia surrounding the gentility and graciousness of the South. "Chapin views much of this culture as made possible largely by graceless and dark systems. This obfuscation of ugliness and the worship of appearance is the theme that runs throughout her new body of work." Ayup. Now, how about a large array of exemplary fauvist portraits, sometimes embellished by frames of tulle or active neon twisted like wild yarn? This fierce combo sizzles like angel spit on a griddle, makes eyes take wing. Recommended.
    Tuesdays-Sundays. Through March 24
All Events
  • Music

    1964 (Beatles tribute)

    Sat., March 2, 7pm, 9:30pm
  • Film

    Special Screenings

    Alita: Battle Angel: Passport to Iron City

    Explore the setting of Robert Rodriguez's new film, the post-apocalyptic, gritty, refuse-filled Iron City. You'll interact with city residents, earn credits for completing puzzles and challenges, experiment with the technology, and uncover hidden clues. The film opens Feb. 14.
    Jan. 29-March 31. Daily, 2-10pm. $25.
    1901 E. 51st
  • Arts

    Theatre

    A Doll’s House, Part 2

    Alrighty, then! FronteraFest’s over, Ken Webster’s been making theatre in Austin for 40 years, and now, here’s the latest from Hyde Park Theatre: It’s Lucas Hnath’s highly modern sequel to Henrik Ibsen’s classic, in which Nora must return 15 years after her dramatic exit to face all she left behind. This long-awaited continuation is directed by that award-winning Webster and features Katherine Catmull, Tom Green, Sarah Chong Harmer, and Cyndi Williams.
    Through March 30. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. $23-27 (pay what you can, Thursdays).  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    AARC: Let the Colors Speak

    Rashmi Thakur and Supriya Kharod, both born in India and both proud Austinites now, document their individual journeys through watercolor and acrylic paintings, depicting the colorful traditions, vibrant life, and diverse culture found in the two communities they love.
    Through March 30  
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Aaron Aryanpur

    Funniest Comic in Texas winner Aryanpur has appeared in clubs, theaters, and colleges nationwide – and his debut album In Spite Of reached number one on the iTunes comedy charts. Do we expect you to know more, except that Brendan K. O'Grady opens for him? No, citizen, we expect you to laugh.
    March 1-2. Fri., 9pm; Sat., 9 & 11pm. $10.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    ACC Dance Classes

    The Dance Department of Austin Community College offers classes in modern, jazz, ballet, and improvisation techniques, with student work produced twice a year in the Choreographers' Showcase. Teachers include Ellen Bartel, Jessica Cox, Kathy Dunn Hamrick, Roxanne Gage, Darla Johnson, Sunny Shen, Catherine Solaas and Melissa Watt. Note: Classes can be taken for credit and applied toward your degree.
    Prices vary, scholarships available.  

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