Home Events

for Fri., March 1
  • Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

    Texas Performing Arts presents Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater on its 2024 National Tour. The legendary dance company returns to Austin after more than a decade for two special and unique performances including new works and Ailey’s iconic ballet Revelations.
    Mar. 2-3  
    Bass Concert Hall
Recommended
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Always a Boy

    Author of Never a Girl, Always a Boy and subsequent co-playwright of its stage adaptation Jo Ivester hopes the play written alongside her son Jeremy serves to “contribute to the growing awareness of what it means to be Trans.” After an industry presentation in NYC with Tony-Award winning A Strange Loop producer JJ Maley directing, this personal transition story comes home for its world premiere at Ground Floor featuring director Lisa Scheps and performers Laura Leo Kelly, Kaden Ono, Molly Fonseca, Nathan Jerkins, Max Green, Chelsea Corwin, Trace Turner, and Jeremy.– James Scott
    Thursdays-Sundays. Through March 1
  • Community

    Sports

    ATX Open

    Though inaugural ATX Open singles champion Marta Kostyuk won’t return to defend her crown, some notable names have entered the field. Two-time major champion and former world No. 1 Victoria Azarenka (No. 27 in the WTA Tour rankings as of Feb. 19) looks set to play as the draw’s No. 1 seed but has since dropped from the tournament. 2017 US Open champion Sloane Stephens, 2022 Australian Open finalist Danielle Collins, and former Longhorn Peyton Stearns are some of the American women returning for the tournament’s second edition. Stearns won the 2022 NCAA Division I Women’s Singles Championship while attending UT-Austin and made the quarterfinals of last year’s ATX Open. Free entry to the event’s qualifying has “sold out” for both Feb. 24 and 25, but paid tickets are still on offer for the remaining days. – Derek Udensi
    Mondays-Sundays. Through March 3
  • Qmmunity

    Arts & Culture

    Boi Orbison’s Nineties & Aughts Country Dance Party

    Even if I didn’t have Marketing and Engagement Manager Cassie Arredondo – aka the reason the Chron circulates in Lockhart – pinging my inbox with great out-of-town events, I’d still lob a Lockhart-located event rec to this South of Austin boot-scoot. Filling out a cowboy hat behind the turntables, DJ Boi Orbison brings country tunes and queer-friendly fun to Historic Downtown Lockhart’s First Friday. Venue Lockhart Arts & Craft brags up a menu of specialty drinks both alcoholic and sober – such as the “you work tomorrow,” which zips strawberry, pineapple, and lime flavors together with hydrating electrolytes. – James Scott
    Fri., March 1
  • Community

    Events

    Diasporic Disco

    Austin Asian American Film Festival hosts its first queer prom, Diasporic Disco, as a fest fundraiser. Hosted by the hilarious Ivy Le (remember her from that event reco Hello Austin, like, one day above this?), this groovy gathering features performances by promqueen and DJ Phamstar, child care for kiddos 5-12 years old, a prom photo booth, refreshments, and awards celebrating queer Asian American filmmakers with AAAFF. They also gathered tons of resources for pre-prom research at aaafilmfest.org/diasporicdisco, so you can deep dive on disco’s influence in various Asian cultures. Highly recommended: How else will you get educated on Vietnamese New Wave? – James Scott
    Fri., March 1
  • Music

    Eli Josef (farewell show), sleep well., StaleFish

    Since launching in 2019 with the inquisitive pop-rock push-and-pull of internet-ready track “I Love You Aubrey Plaza,” Eli Josef’s conversational, chillout catalog has held on with self-deprecating catchiness and a carefree cadence. Some say quit while you’re ahead, so the Austin artist officially taps out with a self-titled LP on local label Happen Twice, where titles “Cowboy Therapy” and “Slowcore Country Boy” aptly point to an infusion of barroom twang (plus a cover of Big Thief’s “Red Moon”). The band’s final stand calls on sleep well. (whose latest It’s Getting Brighter joins Josef on Spotify’s open-ended “Fresh Finds Folk”) and Stalefish (who just released their own alt-rocking Stalefish Does America). – Rachel Rascoe
    Fri., March 1, 8pm
  • Arts

    Books

    First Light Book Club: Tiger’s Wife

    Hyde Park’s neighborhood bookstore continues its dedication to building community with its free book club, and this week the selected title is Téa Obreht’s The Tiger’s Wife. The award-winning 2011 novel, set in an unnamed Balkan state during the tumultuous and bloody 20th century, focused on the complex relationship between doctors and death, and drew on Obreht’s own family history. RSVPs help the organizers know how many booklovers to expect, with sessions at 4:30pm and 7pm. – Richard Whittaker
    Fri., March 1
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Fresh Squeezed Ounce of Opera

    Austin’s Julie Fiore and her One Ounce Opera collective of stage-it-anywhere, stage-it-everywhere modern provocateurs take over the Eastside’s storied Museum of Human Achievement for their sixth annual (but first time since 2020!) mini-opera showcase, bringing four dynamic new works chosen from more than 40 submissions nationwide. Relevant to the here-and-now, redolent of sonic glory and classic style, the revelations of “An Artist’s Regrets,” “Bubbie and the Demon,” “I Am Worth Nothing,” and “What the Spirits Show” will touch your heart and wow your ears with the power of the human voice. – Wayne Alan Brenner
    March 1-3
  • Qmmunity

    Nightlife & Parties

    Hay Bésame Mucho Fest en la Casa

    Look: No one is saying a lineup that includes Los Tigres del Norte, Caifanes, and Alejandra Guzmàn isn’t extremely cool. But Bésame Mucho is on March 2 – one day after rent is due! For the broke community and broke allies, Los Mentirosos and Bobby Pudrido’s event provides all the fun without turning anyone away for lack of funds. Catch trans and Latine drag royalty performances by Solovino, Ryan, Venus Rising, Ruby Knight, Aeon Mavis York, and Teo; DJ sets by La Morena and BabiBoi; and a performance from SATX panza fusion dance troupe Zombie Bazaar. Why shell out big bucks for a baller baile? Hay comida en la casa! – James Scott
    Fri., March 1
  • Community

    Civic Events

    Last Day of Early Voting/Election Day

    This week is your last chance to vote early in the March 2024 primary election before election day next Tuesday. Take advantage of the weekend to cast a ballot and make your voice heard in important races that will decide who represents us in the courts, Legislature, and U.S. Congress and Senate. Turnout is hovering around a dismally low 4%. If you ever want to see Texas turn blue, it’s just a matter of showing up. Need help deciding who to trust? We spent weeks interviewing all the candidates we could; check out detailed Chronicle endorsements online before you go, and take a short list with you to the polls. – Lina Fisher
    Early Voting start, March 1; election day, March 5
    Various locations
  • Music

    Leti Garza (performance & record signing)

    “I’m in a little piece of heaven,” Leti Garza checked in early pandemic, “where there’s nothing except cows, who periodically eat grass in my front yard, a large assortment of birds, and the big, blue Texas sky.” You could hear it in the Texan’s Latin folk-pop then and especially on the resulting Canciones Sobre la Vida y la Muerte, a bilingual gem of Hill Country spirituality. Still but lifting – the spirit takes flight in the meditative – Garza’s songs of life and death sing, dance, cavort. Waterloo Records reclaimed the Best Record Store heavyweight belt at this year’s AMAs, so let’s pachanga. – Raoul Hernandez
    Fri., March 1, 5pm
  • Qmmunity

    Arts & Culture

    Madly Involved

    Curated by Texan Mueni Loko Rudd, this exhibition highlights art from Black creators like Audrey Lyall, Moses Leonardo, Sacugar, and Big Linda. Opening night is this Friday, but the show runs through April 14.
    Thursdays-Sundays. Through April 14
    Future Front, 1900 E. 12th
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812

    You’re a busy guy; you don’t have time to read all of War and Peace. But you’re also ashamed that you’ve not dug into the hottest Russian novel of 1869! Hark: A solution awaits at the Zach Theatre production of Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812, Dave Malloy’s musical adaptation of a 70-page section of Tolstoy’s great tome. Described by the theatre as an “innovative electro-pop opera,” this two-hour-and-thirty-minute love triangle will be available as pay-what-you-will until Feb. 4. Heads-up to queers: Thursday, Feb. 1, is PRIDE night!– James Scott
    Jan. 30-March 3. Wed.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sun., 2:30pm. $25.  
  • Community

    Events

    Rodeo Austin Cowboy Breakfast

    As Rodeo Austin gears up to put on the big show starting March 8, the nonprofit keeps a tradition alive with the annual Cowboy Breakfast. Y’see, back in the cattle-drivin’ days, cowboys would fuel up in the morning with an enormous breakfast because stopping midday for a meal was too much trouble. So Rodeo Austin readies for its two-week-long bronco bonanza with a massive chuck wagon buffet open to the public from 6 to 8am, offering Texas delicacies like pulled pork breakfast tacos, El Patio chips & salsa, java and hot cocoa from Texas Coffee Traders, and lots more. The Pearl Snaps turn the parking lot into a honky-tonk with their classic country tunes soundtracking the whole affair. – Kat McNevins
    Fri., March 1
  • Arts

    Theatre

    She Loves Me

    If you’ve never seen or heard of Miklós László’s 1937 play Illatszertár, don’t worry: You know the story. Two colleagues who hate each other at work are dearest friends as anonymous pen pals. Sound familiar now? It’s Ernst Lubitsch’s The Shop Around the Corner, and In the Good Old Summertime starring Judy Garland, and the *other* Tom Hanks/Meg Ryan rom-com, You’ve Got Mail. But it’s also this delightful musical from Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick, the duo behind Fiddler on the Roof, which only becomes more charming with every new staging. – Richard Whittaker
    March 1-3
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton: The Floating World

    The opportunity to witness, in person, the creative expression of different times and diverse cultures is one of the perks of city-dwellers everywhere – and exemplified by the collections and traveling exhibitions hosted by UT’s acclaimed Blanton Museum of Art. The Blanton’s newest show displays masterpieces from Edo-period Japan, on loan from the Worcester Art Museum through June 30. These “pictures of the floating world” depict the lifestyle, pleasures, and interests of the urban population – samurais, geishas, kabuki actors, boat parties, palaces, and lush landscapes. As then, so now: Much of who we are is what we do with our lives. – Wayne Alan Brenner
    Feb. 11-June 30
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Thin Spaces: Seeking Nature’s Ethereal Conduits

    This three-person show of visual art at the venerable Dougherty Arts Center suggests ways in which “the natural world can serve as a conduit to a deeper understanding of the ethereal,” divulging liminal places where material and spirit intertwine. Local and simultaneously beyond locale, the layered oil abstractions of Rebecca Bennett, the stunningly manipulated photography of Leslie Kell, and Elena Lipkowski’s digital collages embellished with hand-stitched embroidery shift the gallery’s walls toward wonder and may open your doors of perception into a realm that’s downright seelie. Bonus: Meet the artists there tonight, 7-9pm. – Wayne Alan Brenner
    Feb. 3-March 9
All Events

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