Home Events

for Fri., March 22
  • National Taco Championships: Austin

    Journey through a Taco-Tastic event of epic portions featuring 35+ Taco Makers battling it out for the $10,000 prize fund. Eat your way through $3 tacos around the festival, live music, Lucha Libre wrestling, Hot Chili Pepper Eating contest, Chihuahua Beauty Pageant, Day of the Dead Wedding, a boutique Tequila Expo with 100+ tequilas to sample, VIP experiences, and more!
    Sat. Mar. 30, 11am-6pm  
    Austin American-Statesman
  • HONK!TX 2019 Festival of Community Street Bands

    HONK!TX is a free three-day festival that features over 30 street and brass bands from around the country, performing in public spaces around Austin, Texas. This family-friendly event will take place in Mueller Lake Park, Friday evening March 29th; Adam Hemphill Park all day Saturday, March 30th; and will conclude with a concert in Pan Am Park Sunday afternoon March 31st.
    Mueller Lake Park
Recommended
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Puddles' Pity Party

    The "Sad Clown with the Golden Voice" returns with his heartfelt anthems and a suitcase full of Kleenex to perform a show peppered with a brilliant sense of the absurd, mixing much humor with awkward, tender moments.
    Fri., March 22, 8pm. $35-100.  
    • Arts

      Dance

      BLIPSWiTCH: On the Skids

      This fourth evening-length work from BLiPSWiTCH is an examination of urban sprawl throughout Austin and the world, exploring the changes in our spatial and cultural landscapes and how these thresholds of time affect our own personal transformations. Featuring choreography by Taryn Lavery and Alex Miller.
      March 20-23. Wed.-Sat., 8pm. $25.  
    • Community

      Sports

      Texas Stars

      Vs. Chicago Wolves: Fri., March 22. Vs. Grand Rapids Griffins: Sat., March 23. Vs. Manitoba Moose: Wed., March 27. All games at 7pm. $22-50.
    • Music

      Butthole Surfers: What Does Regret Mean? booksigning w/ Paul Leary, King Coffey, Jeff Pinkus, Teresa Taylor, & author Aaron Tanner

      Cris Kirkwood was seriously suspicious the band fucked their dog. Daniel Johnston remains certain they were satanic. Their live show made Melvins drummer Dale Crover physically ill. Then and now, the notoriety that precedes one’s introduction to the Butthole Surfers falls short of the brilliantly demented experience that follows.: That’s made clear in What Does Regret Mean?, a new 300-page Butthole Surfers art book stuffed with bewildering photos, flyers, zine clippings, and star-studded testimonials. Both Jesus Lizard/Scratch Acid frontman David Yow and Black Flagger Henry Rollins declare that the Texas gang were one of the best live bands ever. Still, forwarder Dean Ween offers the most apt endorsement:: “My Grateful Dead – a band worth driving anywhere to see, and I did just that for the next 10 years. My generation’s spokesmen – a completely uncompressed band that I could stand behind. If I saw a dude wearing a Buttholes shirt, that was enough for me to ask if they were holding any drugs or offer up my own.”: “The themes that prevailed were that, ‘The shows were the most intense anyone had ever seen’ and that, ‘The band gave other musicians of that era the courage to be free and experiment,’” explains the compendium’s curator, Aaron Tanner.: A noted poster artist and designer, Tanner got authorization from Paul Leary to craft this visual history of the Butthole Surfers. After a year of unearthing images, collecting quotes, and laying it out, the 1,500-run hardcover hits the market Friday with a Waterloo Records booksigning featuring band members Leary, King Coffey, Jeff Pinkus, and Teresa Taylor.: The kind of book you can read in an hour and enjoy for a lifetime, What Does Regret Mean? deserves placement on any Butthole Surfers fan’s coffee table – or, at least, the back of their shitter.
      Fri., March 22, 7pm
    • Arts

      Theatre

      A Doll’s House, Part 2

      Alrighty, then! FronteraFest’s over, Ken Webster’s been making theatre in Austin for 40 years, and now, here’s the latest from Hyde Park Theatre: It’s Lucas Hnath’s highly modern sequel to Henrik Ibsen’s classic, in which Nora must return 15 years after her dramatic exit to face all she left behind. This long-awaited continuation is directed by that award-winning Webster and features Katherine Catmull, Tom Green, Sarah Chong Harmer, and Cyndi Williams.
      Through March 30. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. $23-27 (pay what you can, Thursdays).  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Antigonick

      This contemporary version of the classic Greek drama is translated and strangely reimagined by award-winning poet Anne Carson, asking "What can one woman do in the face of unjust laws? What is she willing to sacrifice?" Diana Lynn Small, directing the show for Salvage Vanguard, stretches the boundaries of story in poetry and theater. Bonus: original music by Henna Chou.
      March 21-April 6. Thu.-Sat., 7:30pm. $10-20.  
    • Community

      Events

      Asian Eats Night Market

      Inspired by evening street markets common in East and Southeast Asia, the GAACC looks to introduce the variety of Asian cuisine while inspiring entrepreneurs to bring lesser-known Asian dishes to the market.
      Fri.-Sat., March 22-23. Free.
      St. Vincent de Paul Thrift Store, 901 W. Braker
    • Arts

      Classical Music

      ASO: Creative Expression

      The Austin Symphony celebrates treasures composed by women throughout the ages, with works by Fanny Mendelssohn Lili Boulanger, Clara Schumann, Vítězslava Kaprálová, and award-winning American composer Jennifer Higdon. Bonus: Performances by Time for Three and Michelle Schumann.
      Fri.-Sat., March 22-23, 8pm. $19-100.  
    • Qmmunity

      Community

      Clothing Drive Benefiting Out Youth

      When the powers combine a la Austin Pride, Austin Black Pride, and Out Youth, queer youth benefit. So dig through that closet, find some fancy that hasn't seen daylight in years, and donate it to Out Youth's annual youth prom (on April 13). Lightly worn prom dressed, tuxes (or suits), scarves, jewelry, shoes, scarves, clutches, cummerbunds, and accessories needed. Then just drop those donations off at The Q!
      Donations collected through Sat., March 30  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Crime and Punishment

      Performed in 90 minutes with only three actors, this award-winning adaptation of Dostoevsky's masterpiece "compresses all the tension and pathos of the novel into a powerful evening of theatre." Ryan Crowder, Ben Wolfe, and Chelsea Manasseri are directed by Jeremy Lee Cudd for Penfold Theatre.
      March 22-April 6. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. $15-30.  
    • Food

      Food Events

      Daijoubu at the Roosevelt Room

      Award-winning bartenders Caer Ferguson and Sharon Yeung of the Roosevelt Room host this Asian cocktail pop-up, showcasing cocktails inspired by their cultural heritage and upbringing by using Asian flavors and culinary techniques.
      Fri-Sun., March 22-24, 6pm-12mid
    • Music

      DreamGaze ATX day one

      Local shoegaze aficionado and Cheer Ups booker Trish Connelly teams with California’s online shoegaze frequency DKFM for a two-day overload. Belgium’s Slow Crush highlights Friday’s bill with spacious, amorphous gloom.
      Fri., March 22, 9pm
    • Arts

      Classical Music

      One Ounce Opera: Fresh Squeezed Ounce of Opera

      The progressive vocal powerhouses of OOO present their fourth annual Fresh Squeezed Ounce concert in the intimate surroundings of the Museum of Human Achievement, with this year’s winning crop of micro-operas performed – beautifully – in English, featuring intriguing characters, unexpected stories, varied styles and colors. Recommended: Join director Julie Fiore and her company of glory for this showcase of new works. Note: Some of this material is, ah, definitely not for the kiddos, capisce? Bonus: Beverages from Tito's, Live Oak, and Whitestone.
      Through March 31. Fri.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 2pm. $20-25 (free on March 24).  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Raw Paw Gallery: Notes From a Windowless Room

      "These paintings," says Nadia Waheed, "are an effort to form a bridge between my Pakistani heritage and my westernization, primarily by exploring the brown female nude." Several large works by Waheed adorn the delightful Raw Paw space over there in the Yard on St. Elmo, and – tell you what – if every creative "effort" were as well-wrought and lovely to behold as these paintings, the whole world would be a better place to have eyes in.
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Recspec Gallery: Exquisite Corpse

      Here's one final exhibition for Recspec's current digs, before the whole Flatbed complex is shut down and everyone scatters to, like, the four winds. So they're having several of the best local artists who've shown at the gallery return to cover every wall in the place with their connecting artwork. Featuring work by Tim Kerr, Annie Alonzi, Thor Harris, Alanna Loosen, Lance McMahan, Lindsay Eyth, Mike Combs, Polly Morwood, Annalise Gratovich, Katie Cowden, and many more.
      Through March 30
    • Music

    • Arts

      Books

    • Arts

      Comedy

      Shit-faced Shakespeare

      This is the comedy fusion of an entirely serious Shakespeare play with one drunk-off-their-ass cast member. It's been called "side-splitting, raucous, and completely unpredictable," and we ain't about to argue, because it's been months since we saw this crazy thing and we're still laughing.
      Fri.-Sat., March 22-23, 7pm. $16.50.  
    • Film

      Special Screenings

      Tejano (2019)

      This stone-cold thriller portrays violence on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. At this special screening at the Capitol, state Rep. Celia Israel will bring a Resolution to the House on to honor producer and director David Blue Garcia for his work in film in Texas.
      Fri., March 22, 12:30
    • Music

      The Joe Jacksons (album release)

      Power trio from Weary Boys guitarist Mario Matteoli.
      Fri., March 22, 9pm
    • Film

      Special Screenings

      The Juniper Tree (1990)

      Lates: Loosely inspired by the Grimm's fairy tale of the same name, two sisters wander the Icelandic landscape after their mother is sentenced to death for witchcraft.
      Fri., March 22, 10:00  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Wally Workman Gallery: Deconstructing Nostalgia

      Elizabeth Chapin’s work references her Southern upbringing and the conflicted nostalgia surrounding the gentility and graciousness of the South. "Chapin views much of this culture as made possible largely by graceless and dark systems. This obfuscation of ugliness and the worship of appearance is the theme that runs throughout her new body of work." Ayup. Now, how about a large array of exemplary fauvist portraits, sometimes embellished by frames of tulle or active neon twisted like wild yarn? This fierce combo sizzles like angel spit on a griddle, makes eyes take wing. Recommended.
      Tuesdays-Sundays. Through March 24
    • Arts

      Comedy

      Zach Martina

      The Velv comes roaring back (like, "RARRRRR," approximately) after its brief SXSW shuttering, ready to rock your world with this righteous road warrior (you hear his Skunkman album on Sirius/XM all the damn time, right?) and his dark and perforce bearded take on our mad, mad world. Bonus: Ashley Overton opens.
      March 22-23. Fri., 9pm; Sat., 9 & 11pm. $10.  
    All Events
    • Music

    • Film

      Special Screenings

      Alita: Battle Angel: Passport to Iron City

      Explore the setting of Robert Rodriguez's new film, the post-apocalyptic, gritty, refuse-filled Iron City. You'll interact with city residents, earn credits for completing puzzles and challenges, experiment with the technology, and uncover hidden clues. The film opens Feb. 14.
      Jan. 29-March 31. Daily, 2-10pm. $25.
      1901 E. 51st
    • Film

      Special Screenings

      A Clockwork Orange (1971)

      Evergreens: A chilling classic, the movie is a scabrous satire about human deviance, brutality, and social conditioning that has remained a visible part of the ongoing public debate about violence and the movies.
      Fri., March 22, 7:00  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      AARC: Let the Colors Speak

      Rashmi Thakur and Supriya Kharod, both born in India and both proud Austinites now, document their individual journeys through watercolor and acrylic paintings, depicting the colorful traditions, vibrant life, and diverse culture found in the two communities they love.
      Through March 30  
    • Music

    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      AgavePrint: How Life Is

      Graham Dickie’s photographs of hip-hop in rural Southeast Louisiana approach Southern rap with "a grassroots, humanistic perspective, focusing on aspiring artists and how their music relates to their communities and everyday lives."
      Through March 29
    • Music

Information is power. Support the free press, so we can support Austin.   Support the Chronicle