Home Events Live Music

for Sat., June 2
Recommended
  • Music

    Brownout (album release), Third Root, Superfónicos [outdoor]

    Imitation isn’t the highest form of flattery – revolution is. So don’t misconstrue Brownout’s new 12-track homage to Public Enemy as a covers record. Nor is it a sequel to Brown Sabbath, their multivolume tribute to Birmingham’s doomy ironmen. In the funky footsteps of NYC’s El Michels Affair, who led the way with a retro-soul Wu-Tang abstraction called Enter the 37th Chamber, Austin’s Latin groove gang completely reinvents the songs of rap’s greatest rabble-rousers on Fear of a Brown Planet. “The concept was imagining if the Bomb Squad production team were in the studio with the original bands they sampled,” Brownout guitarist/producer Adrian Quesada revealed, referencing those dense soundscapes originally orchestrated by Chuck D, Hank and Keith Shocklee, and Eric “Vietnam” Sadler. “What would it sound like if they had Kool & the Gang circa 1969 – dropping acid and doing funky stuff? Then imagine they had the limitations of that time: no Pro Tools, no Logic, no overdubbing a thousand sounds. It would have some of the aggressiveness and chaos that the Bomb Squad liked, but it would also sound organic.” That method of delineating PE’s source material into grooves, then having trombonist Speedy Gonzales throw in melodic arrangements and renegade composer Peter Stopschinski apply synth licks, results in a cold-as-ice instrumental funk record that’s a killer listen in any context.  “I wanted to make something that nodded to the original songs, but that you could put on without having to think of it as a Public Enemy cover,” said Quesada, prepping for a 16-date tour after Brownout bum rush Mohawk Saturday with Third Root and Superfónicos. “Why would we re-create it when you could just go back and listen to the original Public Enemy records – they would always be better.”
    Sat., June 2, 8pm 
  • Music

    Dave Alvin & Jimmie Dale Gilmore (backed by the Guilty Ones), Colin Gilmore

    A supernatural, Fifties blues jaunt on the title track of Dave Alvin & Jimmie Dale Gilmore’s full-length collaborative bow sells Downey to Lubbock in its opening seconds. Cowpunk pioneer Alvin begins with, “Well, I’m a wild blues Blaster from a sunburnt California town/ And I got a loud Stratocaster that can blow any roadhouse down.” Texan mystic JDG answers with, “Well, I’m an old Flatlander from the great, high plains/ Like wanderlust and wonder, West Texas wind blows through my veins.” Sold.
    Sat., June 2, 9pm
  • Music

    Speedy Ortiz, Anna Burch, Control Top

    Sadie Dupuis evolves indie rock.
    Sat., June 2, 7:30pm 
  • Music

    ICAH Fest w/ Harry Edohoukwa, GXX, Ma$$, Gak, Scroggs, Garrickson, illSociety, the Truth Experiment, TYE Harris, Mike Melinoe, the Vapor Caves, Dirty Mouth, Joaqu.n, (Sam), Chucky Blk, Elian, King Babs & Gallowayyys, Laced

    Austin producer/rapper Harry Edohoukwa and the I Can Always Heal collective created ICAH Fest, a one-day pop-up event, to correct a lack of urban music and art in Austin’s live show market. Fresh off last month’s twisted R&B single “Mrs Mrs,” Edohoukwa headlines the Sixth Street festival, which boasts an 18-act lineup of Texas rappers including trap flexer Gxx and Dallas iconoclast Tye Harris.
    Sat., June 2, 1pm 
  • Music

    Joe Ely, Terry Allen

    Two years ago, the Austin Music Awards created the Townes Van Zandt Award, saluting our state’s greatest songwriters. The first two honorees: Terry Allen and Joe Ely. Both West Texas balladeers have crafted some of the most indelible Lone Star anthems, regaling with highway tales of outsiders and ramblers while pushing art beyond just music. The special acoustic pairing swaps songs and stories of their legendary half-century careers, with special guests like Jo Harvey Allen.
    Sat., June 2, 6:30pm 
  • Music

  • Music

  • Music

    Mobley (album release), Alesia Lani, Mamahawk [indoor]

    Pop polymath dishing Fresh Lies, Vol. I.
    Sat., June 2, 9pm 
All Events

Information is power. Support the free press, so we can support Austin.   Support the Chronicle