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for Fri., Feb. 22
  • A Jam for George!

    Celebrate the music of George Harrison on what would have been his 76th birthday. Featuring live performances by Acey Monaro and Ben Burdick of GO FEVER, Cara Tillman of Moving Panoramas, Paul Banks of P.T. Banks, Austin Lancaster of Blackboot Family Band, T.J. Masters of GUMA, Sam Rives of Jean Wranglers and a full band set from Burgess Meredith! Refreshments provided by Hops & Grain Brewery.
    Sun. Feb. 24, 2pm-6pm
    BLK Vinyl
  • 32nd Annual Old Settler's Music Festival

    Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit (acoustic) and Brandi Carlile headline Old Settler’s Music Festival. Bring the whole family to enjoy camping, jamming, youth activities, workshops, craft beer, gourmet food, and an art fair. Over 30 bands with Del McCoury, Shinyribs, Hayes Carll, Wild Child, Galactic, & more.
    Apr. 11-14  
    Tilmon, TX
Recommended
  • Qmmunity

    Nightlife & Parties

    Frisky Fet-Tease 666

    The six year celebration of all things kink with fetish-inspired seduction, aerials, cabaret, comedy, shock and more. Gemmi Galactic hosts with performances by Amelie Ahmose, Sabor Insanity, Dame Stella Pipes, Sado Moore, Lady Marionette, Jinxy Deviate, and Ryder Strong! Plus guests Courtney Crave, producer of the Dallas Fetish Ball, and Aurora Hart from Austin’s own Midnight Menagerie!
    Fri., Feb. 22, 9pm. $10+.  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Hedwig and the Angry Inch

      Director Dave Steakley and choreographer Abe Reybold bring John Cameron Mitchell's glamorous and rockin' musical classic – about "a fourth-wall-smashing East German rock & roll goddess who also happens to be the victim of a botched sex-change operation, trying to find a place to belong in America," of course – back to the Austin stage. And here's Robert Faires' review of the whole thing.
      Through March 2. Wed.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sat.-Sun., 2:30pm. $30-165.  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Raw Paw Gallery: Notes From a Windowless Room

      "These paintings," says Nadia Waheed, "are an effort to form a bridge between my Pakistani heritage and my westernization, primarily by exploring the brown female nude." Several large works by Waheed adorn the delightful Raw Paw space over there in the Yard on St. Elmo, and – tell you what – if every creative "effort" were as well-wrought and lovely to behold as these paintings, the whole world would be a better place to have eyes in.
      Reception: Fri., Feb. 15, 7pm-12mid
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Atelier Dojo: Nicolás Uribe

      How do you capture the everyday miracles of reality with brushes and pigments? How can this human-filled world bloom like a garden of perceived truths on canvas? Tonight, the world-renowned Uribe offers a live painting demo and talk here at that local powerhouse of figurative artwork in the gallery-filled Canopy complex. Recommended!
      Fri., Feb. 22, 7-9:30pm. Free, but RSVP.  
    • Music

      Churchwood (12:30am), the Flesh Eaters, Sean Wheeler (10:00)

      When Chris Desjardins first convened the Flesh Eaters lineup commandeering the Continental Club this weekend, its limited shelf life was inherent. He’d already recorded and performed with several ad hoc aggregates bearing the name, always composed of L.A. punk luminaries, so no one batted an eye when 1981’s A Minute to Pray, a Second to Die boasted half of X (John Doe, DJ Bonebrake) and three-fifths of the Blasters (Dave Alvin, Steve Berlin, Bill Bateman). Ears may have done a double-take at the free jazz/swamp R&B/garage punk backing Desjardins’ yowled beat verse.: “I’d been listening to a lot of African music,” recalls Desjardins of the album’s inspirations. “A lot of African pop music and tribal chants, and drumming records. I’d gotten a lot of ideas for songs from that, so I wanted to take those indigenous African ideas and transpose them to garage punk as an experiment, to see what kind of rhythms I would get.: “Like, I was listening to a lot of Bo Diddley during that period, and a lot of Link Wray.”: All songs were written via Desjardins singing into a tape recorder, with either Doe or Alvin creating musical beds from cassettes of the singer’s mordant, Rimbaud-at-midnight, creature-feature lyricism. Much of the same methodology is employed on the first Flesh Eaters disc in 14 years, new Yep Roc release I Used to Be Pretty. The triumvirate that created L.A. punk’s songwriting template – literary, bohemian, poetic – remains front and center.: “Even though we all have egos, we’re pretty deferential to each other,” says the bandleader. “I don’t know if that give-and-take would have been so prevalent when we were younger.”
      Fri., Feb. 22
    • Music

      General Smiley w/ Lakandon, Moe, McPullish

      Like last year, dancehall reggae pioneer General Smiley celebrates his birthday locally. Behind sing-song bars, Michigan & Smiley – Anthony Fairclough and Erroll Bennett, respectively – burst onto the iconic Studio One imprint in the late Seventies. Debut single and LP Rub a Dub Style became synonymous with the Jamaican scene and smash hit “Diseases” remains top ranking. A 2012 collaboration with local producer McPullish and Austin’s Lakandon as his current backing band means Smiley’s now a Lone Star general.
      Fri., Feb. 22, 9pm
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Guzu Gallery: Princess Power!

      Note the emphasis: not Princess Power, but Princess Power. Which is to say, here's a show with more than 20 artists paying tribute to a diverse selection of pop-culture princess characters, via limited-edition prints and original artwork.
      Reception: Fri., Feb. 22, 7-10pm
    • Music

      Harvest Thieves, Western Youth, Otis Wilkins, Ben Ballinger

      ATX roots outlaws host a Teflon trio.
      Fri., Feb. 22, 9pm
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Hopscotch: Light and Sound

      Here's a collection of wonders taking over the popular Blue Genie space for a month and a half. It's a showcase of interactive light-based installations by local, national, and international artists, each work requiring participation with the guests to achieve optimum amazement. Note: After 7pm, this spectacle is for ages 18 and older only.
      Through March 31. Fri., 4-11pm; Sat., 1-11pm; Sun., 1-9pm. $15-23.  
    • Arts

      Books

      Jasper Fforde: Early Riser

      Yes, this is the eerie and fantastic new thriller from the acclaimed author of the Thursday Next series. Yes, this event will likely be packed. Yes, you'll need a ticket to join the signing line.
      Fri., Feb. 22, 7pm
    • Music

      John Maus, Sailor Poon [outside]

      Political philosopher John Maus samples his pitched-down, fifth goth-pop LP, 2018’s Addendum, created on modular synthesizers built after a search for musical essence inside the machines.
      Fri., Feb. 22, 9pm
    • The Main Event

      Community

      Jugglefest

      It's the 26th year for this renowned national gathering of talented jugglers (and unicyclists and yo-yo champions and more). Workshops, games, vendors, and more – all culminating in a mind-boggling public performance on Saturday night.
      Fri.-Sun., Feb. 22-24. $10, 1-day; $15, 3-day.
    • Food

      Food Events

      National Margarita Day: Playa Real x Prohibition Creamery

      Admittedly, we’re partial to anything Prohibition Creamery’s got going on, but this collab with the Austin-based blue agave distillers of Playa Real? You’d best hurry if you wanna beat us through the door for this celebration of margaritas – featuring the Playa Piña Rita that melds house-made sangria sorbet with pineapple-infused tequila. Oh, to be so deliciously wasting away again!
      Fri., Feb. 22, 4-6pm. $8.  
    • Music

      No Idea Festival w/ Toshimaru Nakamura & Sean Meehan

      Since the highly social act of musical improvisation oxygenates any festival, at the 16th annual No Idea Festival, fresh air abounds. From banjo to cornet and through degrees of composition, installation, and site-specific encounters, local and international performers will navigate limitless, on-the-spot possibilities. Tonight features Toshimaru Nakamura from Tokyo, who redefined “instrument” by using a mixer as one.
      Fri., Feb. 22, 8pm
    • Qmmunity

      Arts & Culture

      OUTsider Festival: Queeriosities

      Come one, come all, to Austin's trans-media fest full of wonderful wackadoos and quintessential queeriosities from the most marvelous magic-makers. The five-day extravaganza kicks off Wednesday at 7pm with the opening night performance of Our Future Ends, followed by a party with Ah-Mer-Ah-Su and Krudxs Cubensi. Thursday starts bright and early with the first 11am Conference on the Couch before returning to the Vortex at 6pm for several features, including M. Lamar's "American Cuck." (Laverne Cox's twin!) Couch dialogues run through Saturday, with full days Friday (catch Jesus I. Valles' play (Un)Documents followed by this year's Legacy Award winner Phranc) and Saturday (Australia's Fringe Fest queen Betty Grumble), and the fest closes Sunday night with a queer ode to Janet Jackson. Full schedule online.
      Wed.-Sun., Feb. 20-24. $45+.  
    • Music

    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Stuart Wallace: Future Artifacts of Sprawl and Sting

      Yes, this might take a little while to get to, as Georgetown is kinda up there, isn't it? But never mind that, because the end of the world will also take a while to reach, yet that's where we're all eventually headed.

      And a local artist – Stuart Wallace – has gotten there first, is the idea here, and he's brought back an array of artifacts that are as eerie as they are graceful. I can't properly express the odd and sublime aesthetics of what the man's wrought, but I can tell you that the pieces often include abandoned wasps' nests and ball moss and photos and rope, expertly arranged, and they're often framed in wood that Wallace has carefully charred with a flame thrower.

      Real talk: There's already too much to see in Austin, already too much for a listings editor to cover; WTF would make me take the time to promote this show up at the Georgetown Public Library? Answer: The sheer, stunning beauty of this work.

      Go ahead, make a whole afternoon of it, check out Wallace's "Future Artifacts" and that "Floating Points" exhibition at the Georgetown Art Center while you're moseying around, maybe stop for an exquisite meal at Jack Gilmore's Salt Traders Coastal Cooking on the way there or back. But FFS don't miss this show.

       
      That ol' Facebook Link
    • Arts

      Theatre

      The Feud

      In this new musical comedy from Texas Comedies and the ever-adventurous Crank Collective, it's Texas in the 1870s and an army officer is all that stands between an outlaw family and bloodthirsty vigilantes. Based on actual events in our state's tumultuous history, now on stage with singing, dancing, riding, fighting – and a live band. See a wronged woman seek her own brand of twisted justice! See old-timey citizens fighting over land and cattle! See this rip-snorting production directed by John Cecil!
      Through Feb. 23. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. $12-24.  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      The Improvised Play Festival

      You might be aware, yes, that Austin is at the forefront of narrative, theatrical improvisation? It's true – hell, it's internationally recognized – which is why, once a year, the Hideout assembles a full weekend of improvised one-act plays. (The international recognition might even be partially because the Hideout assembles a full weekend of – ah, you see where we're going with this.) This year's schedule of wildly inventive entertainment is packed with the venue’s own repertoire of shows, other local shows, and special out-of-town guests from Vancouver, Atlanta, and Amsterdam. That's three nights packed with shows from the likes of La Vida de los Muertos, Fistful of Kicks, Parallelogramophonograph, Dark Side of the Room, Big Gay Musical, and many more. Pro tip: An All-Access Pass will get you the best bang (read: fun) for your bucks all weekend long.
      Feb. 21-23. Thu.-Fri., 8-11pm; Sat., 6-11pm. $5-45.  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      The Rover

      Scandalous! Lewd! Morally depraved! The acclaimed Hidden Room company presents this rarely performed delight from 1677 through the lens of "a few very special teen films of 1983." (Think: Valley Girl.) So, if you’re looking for a mash-up of Restoration/New Romantic proto-feminist sexploitation, complete with swashbuckling sword fights, forbidden romance, masked revelers, and bitchen live music, then pop your ruffled collar and behold Aphra Behn’s transgressive romp as directed by Beth Burns and featuring a cast whose diverse talents will thrill your senses.
      Through March 3. Fri.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. Extra shows: Wed.-Thu., Feb. 27-28, 8pm. $11-35.  
      York Rite Masonic Hall, 311 W. Seventh
    • Arts

      Theatre

      The Three Musketeers

      St. Ed's presents Megan Monaghan Rivas' new adaptation of the classic coming-of-age story inspired by the novel by Alexandre Dumas. It's set in a 17th-century France where men and women are equal in their ability to serve the crown. This regional premiere features local MVPs Marc Pouhé and J. Ben Wolfe among a fine collegiate cast, directed by Michelle Polgar. And here's what the Chronicle's Trey Gutierrez thought of the show.
      Through Feb. 24. Wed.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sun., 2pm. $10-25.  
    • Qmmunity

      Community

      Transgender Feminism Reading Group

      Trans theorist Talia Bettcher is stopping by this month's reading group to discuss one of her most famous essays, “Evil Deceivers and Make Believers,” and share some snacks. Email for a PDF.
      Fri., Feb. 22, 2:30-4:30pm  
      UT campus, Gordon-White Building, 210 W. 24th
    • Music

      Wagoneers w/ Monte Warden, Tylor Branden (6:00)

      Buddy Holly honky-tonk.
      Fri., Feb. 22
    All Events
    • Film

      Special Screenings

      Alita: Battle Angel: Passport to Iron City

      Explore the setting of Robert Rodriguez's new film, the post-apocalyptic, gritty, refuse-filled Iron City. You'll interact with city residents, earn credits for completing puzzles and challenges, experiment with the technology, and uncover hidden clues. The film opens Feb. 14.
      Jan. 29-March 31. Daily, 2-10pm. $25.
      1901 E. 51st
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      AARC: Let the Colors Speak

      Rashmi Thakur and Supriya Kharod, both born in India and both proud Austinites now, document their individual journeys through watercolor and acrylic paintings, depicting the colorful traditions, vibrant life, and diverse culture found in the two communities they love.
      Through March 30  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      AARC: Storied and Pop Japan

      Two new art shows at the Asian American Resource Center. First, there's STORIED, in which Katherine Leung reflects the Tuvan culture in her Faces of Central Texas series, incorporating the folklore of golden light gods; and JU Salvant draws upon the personal history of a young girl’s journey from Vietnam to America for the visual story, Red Sky in the Morning. And then there's POP JAPAN, curated by Guzu Gallery's own Vincent X. Torres, presenting an array of notable characters from Japanese television, film, anime, and manga.
    • Music

    • Music

      All Skate

      Fri., Feb. 22, 8pm
    • Music

      Allan & LaDonna

      Fri., Feb. 22, 8pm
    • Arts

      Comedy

      Allie Amrien

      This nationally touring comedian based out of Los Angeles was a finalist in the World Series of Comedy 2018. Also, "her dark sense of humor is told through a voice so husky it could pull a sled on the Iditarod." Bonus: Enzo Priesnitz is opening for her.
      Feb. 22-23. Fri., 9pm; Sat., 9 & 11pm. $10.  

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