Home Events

for Fri., March 30
  • HONK!TX 2019 Festival of Community Street Bands

    HONK!TX is a free three-day festival that features over 30 street and brass bands from around the country, performing in public spaces around Austin, Texas. This family-friendly event will take place in Mueller Lake Park, Friday evening March 29th; Adam Hemphill Park all day Saturday, March 30th; and will conclude with a concert in Pan Am Park Sunday afternoon March 31st.
    Mueller Lake Park
  • National Taco Championships: Austin

    Journey through a Taco-Tastic event of epic portions featuring 35+ Taco Makers battling it out for the $10,000 prize fund. Eat your way through $3 tacos around the festival, live music, Lucha Libre wrestling, Hot Chili Pepper Eating contest, Chihuahua Beauty Pageant, Day of the Dead Wedding, a boutique Tequila Expo with 100+ tequilas to sample, VIP experiences, and more!
    Sat. Mar. 30, 11am-6pm  
    Austin American-Statesman
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  • Qmmunity

    Community

    HavenCon 4: A Cosmic Journey

    Texas' first and only queer, geek, and gaymer convention returns for its final year, and they're going out with a bang! Four days (or one, if you choose) of epic nerdiness, cosplay, drag, and loads more. This year, celebrity guests include Tracee Cocco (Star Trek) and Daniel Newman (The Walking Dead). Fest organizers announced this will be the last year for HavenCon, so get out and get weird while you can!
    March 29-April 1. $15-200.
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Jay Whitecotton!

    This is a one-night-only show, because you try running the hilarious Whitecotton for two nights, someone's gonna send in the National Guard. Still, Pat Dean, the Velv's manager, he can't help pushing that fucking envelope, can he? No, he can't – which is why he's got Duncan Carson opening. Maximum impact here tonight.
    Fri., March 30, 9 & 11pm. $10.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Jimmy LaFave: Searching for Peace Town

    Celebrate the late, great singer-singwriter at the debut exhibit of his photography: This is the first time LaFave's road, travel, and music shots will be shared with the public.
    Through March 31
  • Film

    Special Screenings

    Lane 1974 (2017)

    Femme Film Fridays: This coming-of-age drama is adapted from The Hypocrisy of Disco, Clane Hayward's memoir about growing up in the maelstrom of 70s counterculture. Also screening: Stephanie Ard's short film "That Day," which will be discussed with UT professor Dr. Donna Kornhaber.
    Fri., March 30, 7:00  
  • Community

    Sports

    Texas Relays

    There will be students from across the country running around in circles and jumping long and high and often. At night people come out in droves and fill up Sixth Street enough to make SXSW crowds look like a stroll in the woods. (Not really, but kinda.)
    Through March 31. $10-40.  
  • Music

    Urban Music Fest w/ En Vogue, Vivian Green, Althea René feat. Kyle Turner & Michael Ward, Texas Jazz Explosion

    Before Destiny’s Child, Oakland’s En Vogue produced a steady stream of Nineties R&B classics, including “Don’t Let Go” and “Hold On.” Terry Ellis, Rhona Bennett, and Cindy Herron still offer balladic romanticism on Electric Café, their first album in 14 years. For Urban Fest’s 13th iteration, Friday also stacks Philly neo-soul siren Vivian Green, Detroit jazz flutist Althea Rene, Houston’s smooth saxist Kyle Turner, and his San Antonio counterpart on violin, Michael Ward.
    Fri., March 30
  • Music

  • Music

  • Music

    Brian Fallon & the Howling Weather, Ruston Kelly

    While Gaslight Anthem remains on hiatus, frontman Brian Fallon plies both amplified power chords and acoustic plectrum transients. After a two-year solo career running in the opposite direction from The ’59 Sound, his new Sleepwalk finds the singer re-embracing what he does best: Giving Springsteen-scopic arena rock a punk makeover. Kacey Musgraves’ new husband Ruston Kelly, meantime, comes off like Ryan Adams’ scruffier, horror-movie-obsessed cousin.
    Fri., March 30, 8pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Brown Bag Lunch: Austin in the Eighties

    Pack your lunch and head to the Austin History Center for a trip down memory lane, as Texas Bill – that is, acclaimed photographer Bill Leissner – offers a talk about Austin in the Eighties and shares some of his favorite photographs from that period in the city's evolving narrative.
    Fri., March 30, noon-1pm
  • Arts

    Theatre

    con flama

    Salvage Vanguard Theater presents Sharon Bridgforth's lyrical drama, set in Los Angeles in the 1940s-1970s, that offers a glimpse of a black gurl's coming-of-age, through ancestral passages and her family history. Directed by Florinda Bryant.
    Through April 7. Thu.-Sat., 7:30pm. $10.  
  • Film

    Special Screenings

    Cruel Story of Youth (1960)

    Forbidden Colors: The Transgressions of Nagisa Ôshima: A new Austin Film Society retrospective launches with this early film by one of the leading lights of the Japanese New Wave, Nagisa Ôshima, who is probably best known for his flinch-provoking love story In the Realm of the Senses. Like most of Ôshima’s films, Cruel Story of Youth depicts the conflict between old and new values. The story pits two young lovers against the world as aimless rebels without a cause who exploit and blackmail men who offend the social order. In Ôshima’s hands, it becomes a timeless story.
    Fri., March 30, 7:00  
  • Music

    Cut Copy, Kauf

    Aussie electro since 2001 offers September’s Haiku From Zero with L.A. opener Ronald Kaufman.
    Fri., March 30, 7pm
  • Community

    Events

    Fashion X Austin

    There's too much to see and do at the largest fashion event in Texas to list here. See website for schedule of events and parties.
    Various locations
  • Music

    Khruangbin, Mattson 2

    Fri., March 30, 8pm
  • Music

    Kool & the Gang, Brownout

    Since 1964, Robert “Kool” Bell, brother Ronald Bell, alto saxist Dennis Thomas, and drummer George Brown have lead this “Too Hot” Jersey crew. “Jungle Boogie,” “Celebration,” and “Ladies’ Night” are irresistible wedding reception staples, but the deep cuts reveal a jazz foundation and sophisticated arrangements. Austin’s Brownout also fills dancefloors via big horn arrangements with a Latin twist. Get down on it.
    Fri., March 30, 8pm
  • Music

    Original Pinettes Brass Band, Betty Harris

    Even closing in on 80, Betty Harris retains a booming, emotive voice.: The Florida-born singer issued stellar soul sides throughout the Sixties, her molasses-slow cover of Solomon Burke’s “Cry to Me” cracking the Top 10 of the R&B charts in 1963. A prolific four-year run with producer Allen Toussaint and subsequent departure from music earned her the title “Lost Queen of New Orleans Soul” despite never living in the Big Easy. In fact, she didn’t like it there.: After a contentious 1965 session where she beefed with Irma Thomas (“I didn’t know who Irma was at that time, but she had a lot of mouth”), Harris worked one-on-one with Toussaint, flying in to lay vocals over tracks the late hitmaker pre-recorded with a rhythm section that became the Meters.: “Your first experience is going into Bell Sound Studios in New York and everything is tip-top, first class,” she recalled last Sunday from her home in Connecticut. “Then you get to New Orleans and here’s a barn with nothing in it. I understand what they were doing now, but back then I didn’t. It was kind of dreary.”: The sound proved different as well, particularly the blistering funk of 1969’s “There’s a Break in the Road,” complete with screeching guitar feedback and fatback drums.: “I couldn’t figure out if Allen had lost: his mind or what! I was totally shocked when I heard it the first time. I couldn’t: figure the drums out. I thought, ‘What are they smoking?!’: “But the song carries itself and still does today.: If you slow it way down, that’s the most funkiest song you’d ever want to hear.”
    Fri., March 30, 10pm
  • Qmmunity

    Arts & Culture

    Second Annual Rebel Grrrl Burlesque

    It's back again – and trust me when I say this show is hot! Belladonna Darling curates and hosts a night of rebel grrrl inspired burlesque and drag with performances by Ruby Lamb, DFW's Justin Beaver and Lana Del Gay, Alice Cooter, Chicago's Vida Ambrose and so many more. Proceeds go to ending sexual and domestic violence (via SAFE), so just go.
    Fri., March 30, 8pm-1am. $15-20.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Wakey, Wakey

    "Though the man telling the jokes is sitting down (he's in a wheelchair), dying is a stand-up routine in this glowingly dark, profoundly moving new play by Will Eno,” states The New York Times. From the playwright of Thom Pain (based on nothing) comes this welcome work of theatre, embodied here by Ken Webster and Rebecca Robinson for Hyde Park Theatre, and so you know that's already like five good reasons to attend. And here's our full review of the show.
    Through March 31. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. $22-26 (pay what you can,Thursdays).  
  • Music

    Wax Motif, NuKid

    Australian Danny Chien now spins L.A. house.
    Fri., March 30, 10pm
  • Arts

    Theatre

    White Rabbit Red Rabbit

    Ground Floor Theatre presents this unusual theatrical experience devised by Iranian playwright Nassim Solimanpour. It's different every night, for you and the show's solo performers, with Rebecca Havermeyer, Zell Miller III, kt shorb, Michael Ferstenfeld, Alexandra Bassett, Marc Pouhé, Shannon Sedwick, Rudy Ramirez, Owen Egerton, and Karen Jambon among those vigorously puppeted by the script.
    Through March 31. Thu.-Sun; times vary; see website for details. $25.  
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