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Visual Arts for Sun., Aug. 29
Events
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    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
CLOSING
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    Visual Arts

    Cloud Tree: If These Walls Could Talk

    Ah, this, citizen: This here is a seven-artist exhibition – featuring Tim Kerr, Niz, Jeremy Burks, Gayla Partridge, Kenneth Holland, Jeff Wheeler, and Win Wallace – curated by Rachel Koper and the abovenamed Wallace, that attempts to reincarnate those "punk creepy shows" (cf., "Hallowed Ground") that used to palpitate the creative hearts at Gallery Lombardi back in the day. You remember those glory years, right? And here, now, each artist brings their voice and style to plaster the Cloud Tree gallery walls with a diversity of figurative pieces. Bonus: Robert Faires reviews the show here.
    Through Aug. 29
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    Visual Arts

    Prizer Arts & Letters: A Specialization in Abstract Speed Painting

    That is precisely what Austin's Carl Smith specializes in, yes, and here are the most recent abstract fruits of his painterly labors – displayed inside this intimate gallery on E. Cesar Chavez, but also, much of the work, viewable through the venue's big front windows (illuminated each night from 8:30-11:30pm).
    Through Aug. 29
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    Visual Arts

    The Museum of Fine Arts, Austin: Midsummer Art Show

    Featuring art by Peter Max, Ron Wood, and other international, national, and local artists.
    Through Aug. 29. Donations accepted.
    1638 E. Second #326
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    Visual Arts

    Yard Dog: Camera-less Photography

    Maine artist Michelle Hauser uses photochemistry in lieu of traditional pigments, painting with historic light-sensitive materials such as cyanotype directly onto rag paper in a darkened room. Once completely dry, the painted surface is exposed to sunlight; in a cool bath of water, the exposure is fixed and her marks turn blue.
    Through Aug. 29
ONGOING
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    Visual Arts

    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
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    Visual Arts

    Art 84: Cornelius Carter

    This is a virtual preview of "Work in Progress" by Austin's Cornelius Carter, a work that "captures the struggles and glory of the African-American experience along with the artist’s faith in the American dream of equality and opportunity for all."
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    Visual Arts

    Art for the People Gallery: Thrive!

    Here's a showcase of work by more than 40 Austinites who’ve created art with an exuberance of color and energy over the past 15 pandemic months.
    Through Sept. 30
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    Visual Arts

    Artworks Gallery: Touch the Seen

    Provocative, monumental figurative paintings by Les Satinover, depicting the human form (mainly male figures) in vast, detailed landscapes that celebrate natural beauty.
    Through Sept. 25
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    Visual Arts

    Beyond Van Gogh

    This traveling spectacle of art, a multimedia exhibition currently ensconced at the COTA, uses cutting-edge projection technology to create an engaging journey into the world of Vincent Van Gogh. Repurposing the artist's dreams, his thoughts, and his words to drive the experience as a narrative, this huge installation will move you along projection-swathed walls wrapped in light, colour, and shapes that swirl, dance and refocus into flowers, cafes and landscapes. As a certain Dude might comment, "This is extremely fuckin' trippy, man." Make your reservations now, citizen, and if the price seems a bit steep, hell, you can probably tap your brother Theo for a loaner, amirite?
    Through Sept. 5. Daily, 11am-9pm. $37 ($24, children).  
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    Visual Arts

    Black Is Beautiful: The Photography of Kwame Brathwaite

    In the late 1950s and throughout the 1960s, Kwame Brathwaite used photography to popularize the political slogan "Black Is Beautiful." This exhibition, the first ever dedicated to Brathwaite’s remarkable career, reveals the story of this key figure of the second Harlem Renaissance – and the Chronicle's Robert Faires has a review of the show right here.
    Through Sept. 19
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    Visual Arts

    GrayDUCK Gallery: Time Being

    Welcome back to Jill Schroeder's powerhouse of an art gallery on the Eastside! Following a brief summer hiatus, the 'Duck returns to present a new exhibition by photographer Elizabeth Chiles: A body of photographs and photographic collages the artist made during the Covid pandemic. This show, she says, "can be seen as a walk, slow and meandering, through a series of repeated forms that came in and out of view on my walks and do the same in the exhibition."
    Through Oct. 3  
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    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
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    Visual Arts

    ICOSA: A Sharp Softness

    This exhibition features new bodies of work by Mai Gutierrez and Suzanne Wyss, with both artists "exploring the reuse of materials in a nontraditional way, piercing the space to create movement and shadow through their use of dimensionality."
    Through Sept. 11
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    Visual Arts

    Laguna Gloria

    This local treasure of a venue, run by those Contemporary Austin folks who also bring us the Jones Center shows Downtown, is all about the outdoors – which is perfect for these trickily navigated times of ours, n'est-ce pas? Recommended: Stop by and breathe in the air, enjoy the lawns and gardens and the many examples of world-class sculpture arrayed across the property, and (as Frankie used to say) r-e-l-a-x.
    Thu.-Fri., 9am-noon; Sat.-Sun., 9am-3pm
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    Lydia Street Gallery: Zero to Sixty

    "Are you prepared to scratch your head in wonderment?" this gallery asks. "Step right up into Steven Bernard Jones' world of radical acceptance and storytelling. 'Zero to Sixty' might feel fast – but as a 60-year-old artist, Jones is just warming up. It’s a journey of rage, turned on its head."
    Through Sept. 16
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    Visual Arts

    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
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    Recspec Gallery: If You Stay In a Place Like This

    Alluringly weird new photographic works by Rosalie Anderson supercharge the wonderground that is this ongoing online gallery.
    Through Aug. 31  
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    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
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    Visual Arts

    The Blanton: Sedrick Huckaby

    Texas-based artist Sedrick Huckaby explores psychology, community, and the human condition in his powerful portraits painted from life. The catalog notes say: "Through his virtuoso facility with oil paint, Huckaby utilizes texture, dimensionality, and intensely saturated colors to extraordinary expressive effect." Says the artist himself: "The African-American family and its heritage has been the content of my work for several years. In large-scale portraits of family and friends I try to aggrandize ordinary people by painting them on a monumental scale."
    Through Dec. 5  
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    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
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    Visual Arts

    The Museum of Future Present

    The Museum of the Future Present is "a visual mixtape of space, time, and mind," with musicians, performers, and visual artists collaborating on a series of explorable installations, to bring music to life in a tangible way inside Austin's Native Hostel. Note: "Installations are featured on a rotating basis, and you never know who may just show up." Oh! You got that FOMO, yet, kid? Maybe don't miss your chance to InstaTok your life within the vibrant audiographic splendor of this new spectacle.
    Wed.-Sun., 11am-10pm. $25.  
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    The Museum of Natural & Artificial Ephemerata

    This place, ah, it's one of our favorite places in the entire city; and of course they're properly corona-closed. But check 'em out online right now – it's a rich, wonder-filled website – to whet your appetite for when things get back to … uh … are we still calling it "normal," these days?
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    Visual Arts

    Umlauf Sculpture Garden

    The Umlauf reopens its famed Garden to the general public. There won’t be any performances going on yet, as occasionally delighted crowds in the Before Times, but there will be all those expertly wrought sculptures, the bronze or stone cynosures from Charles Umlauf and others anchoring sight among the bright gardenscapes and tree-towered paths: Perfect for a strolling, fresh-air respite from yet another screenful of pixels in your all-too-familiar abode.: Note: The usual safety measures will be in effect: A limit of 30 visitors in the garden at a time; a one-way marked path to follow; masks and social distancing strongly encouraged; etc. (You know the routine: You’re an old hand at this pandemic shit by now, right?) Also, know that the Umlauf’s private-event rentals will resume with limited capacity set by local and state guidelines – and its summer camp program will proceed with those restrictions in mind, too.: See the museum’s website for details and to schedule an appointment.
    Tue.-Fri., 10am-4pm; Sat.-Sun., 11am-4pm

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