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Visual Arts for Mon., Nov. 2
Events
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    Visual Arts

    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
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    Women & Their Work: Red Dot Sale

    At the Red Dot Virtual Art Spree, you can purchase paintings, sculpture, drawings, and photography created by more than 60 of Texas' finest artists. Stella Alesi! Sandy Carson! Virginia Fleck! Calder Kamin! Claude Van Lingen! Denise Prince! (And, like we said, more!) Also, bid on an auction of unique experiences and creative getaways; join the curators online for lively conversations about collecting art; take virtual studio visits with Red Dot artists. This annual event will make your usual screen a more enjoyable experience - and proceeds will allow W&TW to introduce hundreds of underserved students in the Austin area to the joy and wonder of contemporary art.
    Through Nov. 2. $25-100.  
ONGOING
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    Visual Arts

    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
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    Visual Arts

    Art 84: Cornelius Carter

    This is a virtual preview of "Work in Progress" by Austin's Cornelius Carter, a work that "captures the struggles and glory of the African-American experience along with the artist’s faith in the American dream of equality and opportunity for all."
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    Visual Arts

    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity.
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    Visual Arts

    Forklift Danceworks: Portraits at Downs Field

    It's the culminating piece of Forklift's year-long residency at Downs Field in East Austin: Portraits of the Downs Field community by photographer Cindy Elizabeth, installed at the field for everyone to see. The project explores the importance of Downs Field to the continual flourishing of baseball in Texas, through the past, present, and future.
    Through Jan. 4
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    Visual Arts

    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
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    Visual Arts

    Joe/Kamala Yard Art on Bellvue

    There, across 14 front yards on Bellvue Avenue: A sign of hope! Signs of hope, actually – the pro-Biden/Harris (or, as the artist puts it, Joe/Kamala) artworks of Austin's David Hefner. It's an excellent opportunity for a lift-up-your-spirits drive-by or walking tour: good stuff, visually, even beyond its message. Also a good excuse – go ahead, do it – to check out that Hefner's website, peruse some of the other works he's done.
    Mayyyybe through Inauguration Day?
    Bellvue Avenue, between 42nd & 45th, two blocks west of Lamar
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    Visual Arts

    MACC Galleries: Reopened!

    The Community Gallery and the Sam Z. Coronado Gallery in the Mexican-American Cultural Center reopen "with social distancing and additional health and safety precautions in place," and inviting reservations to see "Rosy Campanita, El Camino del Corazon, The Path of the Heart," which documents 13 years of struggle, persistence, and resilience between 2003-2016, and "Poética Textil/ Textile Poems," in which contemporary artists reveal their restlessness, inquiry, and research into the creation of fabric art via printing, weaving, and assemblage.
    Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm. Donations accepted.  
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    Visual Arts

    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
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    Visual Arts

    Prizer Arts & Letters: People the We

    This is a collaborative exhibition by Adrian Aguilera and Betelhem Makonnen, conceived in the wake and continuing aftermath of the Black Lives Matter uprisings that were reignited in May 2020. "Over a series of masked and socially distanced exchanges, mostly in the natural spaces outside both their studios, Aguilera and Makonnen tried to give form to the overwhelming personal and collective emotions of rage, disappointment, exhaustion, and bruised hope that they experienced in the last six months. Cultivating their continuous curiosity about the relationship between symbols and collective identity, transnationality and diaspora perspectives, as well as history's inextricable hold on the present, Aguilera and Makonnen introduce new multimedia work in conversation with existing work to reflect on this (re)current moment in our country." Recommended: Make an appointment for viewing; check out the gallery's front window for a preview.
    Through Jan. 3
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    Recspec Gallery: Superstitions

    The unstoppable Recspec presents a new virtual group show, curated by Laurel Barickman and Katie Cowden, featuring works by Annalise Gratovich, Holly Bobisuthi, Cathy Rylander, Kevin Munoz, Kämy Dobï, Pake Stephens, and more, addressing a theme of, well, listen: "In a year where it feels like Lady Luck has left us, jinxes abound, and a black cat has crossed our collective path, we've turned to rituals and superstitions to change our fortunes. Phrases, charms, and talismans – or numbers and actions to avoid – are deeply ingrained in our minds and habits, and we're looking forward to seeing how this group of artists influences our fate." As are we, reader – and how about you?
    Through Nov. 7
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    SUFFRAGE NOW: A 19th Amendment Centennial Exhibition

    On August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote. On August 6, 2020, the Elisabet Ney Museum debuted this new show for which women photographers nationwide were invited to share photos that comment on the Centennial of the Ratification of the 19th Amendment. The most eloquent images were chosen and are included in this online exhibition.
    Through Jan. 31. Free.
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    Visual Arts

    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
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    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum of Art: Expanding Abstraction

    In the early 20th century, Western artists began exploring abstract, nonrepresentational forms for the first time. Several decades later, abstraction's practitioners experimented with new materials and techniques: Dripping, pouring, staining, and even slinging paint became common, as did the use of non-traditional media such as acrylic and industrial paints. Artists also ditched the flat, rectangular format to create sculptural texture and dimensionality. Now, can you guess whose corporate collection is particularly strong in such paintings of the 1960s and '70s? If you guessed "The Blanton Museum of Art," then you'll especially want to get an eyeful of this major new show, subtitled "Pushing the Boundaries of Painting in the Americas," organized by the venue's own Carter E. Foster.
    Through Jan. 10  
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    Visual Arts

    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
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    Visual Arts

    The Museum of Natural & Artificial Ephemerata

    This place, ah, it's one of our favorite places in the entire city; and of course they're properly corona-closed. But check 'em out online right now – it's a rich, wonder-filled website – to whet your appetite for when things get back to … uh … are we still calling it "normal," these days?
Creative Opportunities
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    Call for Entries: ICOSA: Transmissions

    Artists Terra Goolsby and Tammie Rubin would like to collaborate with performing artists for an upcoming experimental exhibition at the ICOSA Collective gallery. And if you're a performing artist and don't know about the visual and textural wonders that Goolsby and Rubin create – but also somehow trust my judgment – lemme tell you: You do want to collaborate with whatever they're up to, if you have the chance. This time, you'll be helping them explore answers to questions like, "What’s performance without the expectations of the traditional “live” shared experiences? How do we create intimacy and connection mediated through limited audiences, projected, and virtual transmissions? Is it possible to trigger an emotive response through distance? By removing the audience from the process of making, what will you explore as an artist?"
    Deadline: Nov. 9  

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