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Visual Arts for Sat., Oct. 31
Events
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    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
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    Women & Their Work: Red Dot Sale

    At the Red Dot Virtual Art Spree, you can purchase paintings, sculpture, drawings, and photography created by more than 60 of Texas' finest artists. Stella Alesi! Sandy Carson! Virginia Fleck! Calder Kamin! Claude Van Lingen! Denise Prince! (And, like we said, more!) Also, bid on an auction of unique experiences and creative getaways; join the curators online for lively conversations about collecting art; take virtual studio visits with Red Dot artists. This annual event will make your usual screen a more enjoyable experience - and proceeds will allow W&TW to introduce hundreds of underserved students in the Austin area to the joy and wonder of contemporary art.
    Through Nov. 2. $25-100.  
OPENING
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    Stephen L. Clark Gallery: Lance Letscher

    An exhibition of new collage works by Austin's own Lance Letscher might be just the thing we need to ground us in these tumultuous times. Or, contrarily, to lift us above the unnerving political fray. That whole thing about art "comforting the afflicted," right? Many of us are trending rather afflicted of late, and the artist's painstaking paper creations will, we insist, mitigate that visually, through graphic reinvention of previous forms, offering a reassuring sense of patterns and meaning to our eyes.
    Through Dec. 26. Tue.-Sat., 11am-4pm
CLOSING
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    Art 84: Cornelius Carter

    This is a virtual preview of "Work in Progress" by Austin's Cornelius Carter, a work that "captures the struggles and glory of the African-American experience along with the artist’s faith in the American dream of equality and opportunity for all."
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    Collection Rert: Scales & Scorpions

    "As this year has been pivotal, uncertain, and brought many changes around the world, it calls to question what new future we are moving into … but, in the meantime, we linger here on the cusp. We've invited a handful of artists to explore the theme of cusps, welcoming any and all interpretations of the theme." Note: Each 30-minute viewing slot can accommodate up to six people who will see the exhibit from two different windows outside the gallery. Masks required. See website for appointment.
    Sat., Oct. 31, 3-8pm
    2608-B Rogers
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    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
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    ICOSA: Comity of Ghosts

    New work by Darcie Book and Shawn Camp? In the main ICOSA space? Thank you, is what we say as we prepare to visit this collection of "disparate objects and images," a show that "oscillates between visceral physicality and ethereal immateriality, tiptoeing back and forth between realms of the living and the dead."
    Through Oct. 31  
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    SAGE Studio: Home Makers

    SAGE Studio, dedicated to connecting contemporary artists with disabilities to Texas’ broader arts community, presents its first virtual exhibition featuring work from 18 artists with intellectual and developmental disabilities from across the world. The art for this show was created at home during quarantine, when so many artists had to quickly shift their practices, alongside home-themed pieces that were made prior to the pandemic. Note: Works are available for viewing (and buying) online.
    Through Oct. 31
ONGOING
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    A05 Gallery

    This popular gallery represents a wide array of artists, both local and international, with creations that span a dazzling plethora of mediums. Cynda Valle. Rachel Dory. John Morse. And – oh, give that website a quick look and you'll be making an appointment ASAP.
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    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
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    Armadillo World Headquarters 50th Anniversary Exhibition

    AusPop presents a celebration of the legendary Armadillo World Headquarters, offering an impressive array of posters, photos, and newspaper clippings with which to immerse yourself in the venue's well-documented history. (No one may know exactly where we're going, these days, but this is – vividly – where we've been.) You can schedule a time in advance to visit the gallery (any Saturday or Sunday) and you've gotta wear a mask, citizen, because this long strange trip is something we're still in the confounding middle of, y'dig?
    Through Dec. 13
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    Art for the People: Where the Bots Begin

    Lauren Briére’s art escorts the viewer on a visual journey into outer space, the fun of sports, walks in nature, and various adventures and shenanigans, as Art for the People showcases 200-plus sketches that are the artist's penciled beginnings to creating her whimsical "Robots in Rowboats."
    Through Jan. 3
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    Bale Creek Allen Gallery: Jun Kaneko

    Ceramics master Kaneko is increasingly drawn to installations that promote civic interaction, having completed more than 60 public art commissions – including a 250-foot-long tile wall at Aquarium Station in Boston, a three-story wall at the University of Connecticut, and an 88-foot-tall Glass Tower at Omaha's Buffett Cancer Center. (Other large permanent installations can be seen in Osaka, Japan; Kansas City, MO; and at the International Finance Center in Shanghai, China.) Most recently, the artist's been working at the Cuernavaca Raku ceramics studio, experimenting with new glazes and the unpredictability of raku. And now here's a show of his fierce sculptural creations, right there at the BCA outpost in Canopy.
    Through Nov. 30
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    Bee Cave Arts Foundation: Dark Sky Photography

    Note: This exhibition is on on display at "The Hive" in the Hill Country Galleria. See website for more.
    Through Nov. 28. Free.
    12700 Hill Country Blvd.
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    Big Medium: Adiós, Amén, Hasta Luego

    "For almost two decades, Federico Archuleta has been a part of Austin’s landscape. More than likely you’ve interacted with his art while dining, shopping, walking, and enjoying the city of Austin." And even that is a Big Medium understatement, as "Archuleta's continued presence in the East Austin Studio Tour, community events, and the walls of local businesses has infused his art and musical influences throughout the city." And now the gallery's got an exhibition of the man's transcendent stencil works in their airy interior, and you can make an appointment to view them in person (Thu.-Sat., noon-6pm, masks required, maximum of 10 guests at a time).
    Through Dec. 5
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    Blue Moon Glassworks

    Handmade glass art and jewelry.
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    Bullock Texas State History Museum: This Light of Ours

    This show features images by activist photographers of the Civil Rights Movement, telling a visual story of the struggle against segregation, race-based disenfranchisement, and Jim Crow laws in the 1960s. These photos capture the day-to-day struggles of everyday citizens and their resolve in the face of violence and institutionalized discrimination – with more than a dozen additional images representing activism and protest in Austin's own history.
    Tuesdays-Sundays. Through Dec. 6
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    Camiba Art: Intersecting Stories

    Make an appointment to check out the new and classic works of local artist Adreon Henry, is what we're recommending right now. Camiba has curated up a fine exhibition of the man's heavily handworked, woven-vinyl, eroded-screenprint, polychrome creations to dazzle your mind and entice fantasies of having such things displayed on your own walls.
    Through Nov. 21
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    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity.
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    Davis Gallery: Evidence of the Search

    The scientists say that the out-of-doors is a good place to avoid those 'ronas that may accrue in crowded, enclosed places, and the scientists know what they're talking about. But did you know that looking at beautiful paintings of the out-of-doors can ward off the weltschmerz that attends a lousy pandemic like what we're all dealing with right now? This reporter swears it's true! Luckily, Davis Gallery is featuring new paintings by Laurel Daniel, whose recent body of work "focuses on well-known surroundings: big skies, colorful Hill Country landscapes, and bountiful florals. The collection includes both smaller plein air paintings finished on location and larger pieces completed in the studio." And you can even book a masked, safely distanced viewing visit with the artist for the show's opening.
    Through Nov. 25
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    EighteenFifteen Gallery: Wresting Place

    This exhibition of new works by Amanda Fay and Anton Chavez "calls to attention the struggles involved in the pursuit of The American Dream. The works featured act both as protest and homage to the trials and tribulations faced by the working class and the sociopolitical circumstances that act as obstacles towards upward mobility." See website for details.
    Through Nov. 26  
    1815 Rosewood
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    Forklift Danceworks: Portraits at Downs Field

    It's the culminating piece of Forklift's year-long residency at Downs Field in East Austin: Portraits of the Downs Field community by photographer Cindy Elizabeth, installed at the field for everyone to see. The project explores the importance of Downs Field to the continual flourishing of baseball in Texas, through the past, present, and future.
    Through Jan. 4
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    GrayDUCK Gallery: Capirotada

    Capirotada is a delicious Mexican bread pudding concocted from a wide variety of nuts and fruits embedded within syrup-soaked bread. In a similar vein, this new show – curated by Los Outsiders – collects a group of artists revealing dialogues about self-reflection, meditation, and communing with nature through art. A fine array of works by Rachel Comminos, Julie DeVries, Soomin Jung, Paloma Mayorga, and Ryan Runcie bridge the ideas of the individual in search of solace in a natural world.
    Through Nov. 1
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    House of Mesmerize: Enter the Multiverse

    This interactive, gallery-style experience inside Austin's Native Hostel "follows the journey of Mesmer, an artist and amateur tinkerer who discovers a secret: we and our universe are not alone. Mesmer opens up a portal and is swallowed into the Multiverse and its infinite cosmic curiosities." The created environment features 15 unique art installations, with multiple paths and possibilities, and you know there'll be safety protocols to follow, too, to thwart those pesky 'ronas. ⁠Note: We'll be looking into this and getting back to you with a full report.
    Through Dec. 20. Thu.-Sun., 11am-11pm. $25.  
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    Joe/Kamala Yard Art on Bellvue

    There, across 14 front yards on Bellvue Avenue: A sign of hope! Signs of hope, actually – the pro-Biden/Harris (or, as the artist puts it, Joe/Kamala) artworks of Austin's David Hefner. It's an excellent opportunity for a lift-up-your-spirits drive-by or walking tour: good stuff, visually, even beyond its message. Also a good excuse – go ahead, do it – to check out that Hefner's website, peruse some of the other works he's done.
    Mayyyybe through Inauguration Day?
    Bellvue Avenue, between 42nd & 45th, two blocks west of Lamar
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    Link & Pin: The #Vote Show

    In the months leading up to the 2016 presidential election – remember that fucking debacle? – Chad Rea's artistic output "took a dramatic turn from witty typographic prints designed at a leisurely pace to activist paintings and sculptures created with desperate urgency." This new show – curated from more than 300 pieces the artist created during the pathetic, colicky, orange-faced baby's White House occupancy – is a diverse collection designed to surprise, inform, entertain, and ultimately get participants to act before November 3.
    Through Nov. 8
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    Lora Reynolds Gallery: County Road

    This exhibition of new photographs by Bryan Schutmaat is the artist's first presentation at LRG. The Houston native, now Austinite, began making his newest group of black-and-white pictures in the spring of 2020 ("just as pandemic fatigue was beginning to set in") while driving deserted back roads between Austin and Leon County, where his family has a farm. The gallery notes say: "Schutmaat's new body of work calls to mind Emily St. John Mandel's 2014 novel, Station Eleven, set 20 years after a virus wipes out 99% of the human population." (Sure – or perhaps it calls to mind one of these post-apocalyptic tales?) But this is some fine camera-work on display, and we recommend it highly.
    Through Nov. 7
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    Martha's Contemporary: Still Here

    Say, here's the inaugural show at Martha's new Guadalupe location – a powerful group exhibition featuring paintings, sculptures, and textiles by Jenaro Goode, Payton McGowen, Adrian Armstrong, Christina Ballentyne, Siena Smith, Alfonzo Gonzales Jr, Erick Medel, Sam Keller, and Alex Nguyen.
    Through Nov. 2. Tue.-Thu., noon-7pm; Fri.-Sat., noon-9pm
    4115 Guadalupe
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    Mexic-Arte Museum

    Day of the Dead In observance of the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos, Mexic-Arte Museum presents the 37th annual Day of the Dead exhibition, paying tribute to the tradition that celebrates the return of the dead, featuring community altars and a special showing of artwork from the Juan Antonio Sandoval Jr. Collection. ELA 25: Intersection: Shock & Relief This annual show, formally known as Young Latinx Artists, celebrates the last 25 years of exhibitions, featuring the work of emerging Latinx artists as curated by Dr. George Vargas and revealing two new murals on the museum’s exterior Fifth Street wall.
    Through Nov. 22
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    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
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    Northern-Southern: Baton

    This is a group show by relay, begun in July of 2020 as a method of socially distancing a community in the height of the pandemic: Artists took turns alone in the space, each adding to the exhibition. Now, as it nears its close, the exhibition resembles a community in which work converses and overlaps. With Adreon Henry, Vy Ngo, Dawn Okoro, Leon Alesi, Matt Steinke, Sev Coursen, Stella Alesi, and more.
    Closing reception: Sat., July 24, 3-9pm
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    Prizer Arts & Letters: People the We

    This is a collaborative exhibition by Adrian Aguilera and Betelhem Makonnen, conceived in the wake and continuing aftermath of the Black Lives Matter uprisings that were reignited in May 2020. "Over a series of masked and socially distanced exchanges, mostly in the natural spaces outside both their studios, Aguilera and Makonnen tried to give form to the overwhelming personal and collective emotions of rage, disappointment, exhaustion, and bruised hope that they experienced in the last six months. Cultivating their continuous curiosity about the relationship between symbols and collective identity, transnationality and diaspora perspectives, as well as history's inextricable hold on the present, Aguilera and Makonnen introduce new multimedia work in conversation with existing work to reflect on this (re)current moment in our country." Recommended: Make an appointment for viewing; check out the gallery's front window for a preview.
    Through Jan. 3
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    Recspec Gallery: Superstitions

    The unstoppable Recspec presents a new virtual group show, curated by Laurel Barickman and Katie Cowden, featuring works by Annalise Gratovich, Holly Bobisuthi, Cathy Rylander, Kevin Munoz, Kämy Dobï, Pake Stephens, and more, addressing a theme of, well, listen: "In a year where it feels like Lady Luck has left us, jinxes abound, and a black cat has crossed our collective path, we've turned to rituals and superstitions to change our fortunes. Phrases, charms, and talismans – or numbers and actions to avoid – are deeply ingrained in our minds and habits, and we're looking forward to seeing how this group of artists influences our fate." As are we, reader – and how about you?
    Through Nov. 7
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    SUFFRAGE NOW: A 19th Amendment Centennial Exhibition

    On August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote. On August 6, 2020, the Elisabet Ney Museum debuted this new show for which women photographers nationwide were invited to share photos that comment on the Centennial of the Ratification of the 19th Amendment. The most eloquent images were chosen and are included in this online exhibition.
    Through Jan. 31. Free.
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    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
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    The Blanton Museum of Art: Expanding Abstraction

    In the early 20th century, Western artists began exploring abstract, nonrepresentational forms for the first time. Several decades later, abstraction's practitioners experimented with new materials and techniques: Dripping, pouring, staining, and even slinging paint became common, as did the use of non-traditional media such as acrylic and industrial paints. Artists also ditched the flat, rectangular format to create sculptural texture and dimensionality. Now, can you guess whose corporate collection is particularly strong in such paintings of the 1960s and '70s? If you guessed "The Blanton Museum of Art," then you'll especially want to get an eyeful of this major new show, subtitled "Pushing the Boundaries of Painting in the Americas," organized by the venue's own Carter E. Foster.
    Through Jan. 10  
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    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
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    The Museum of Natural & Artificial Ephemerata

    This place, ah, it's one of our favorite places in the entire city; and of course they're properly corona-closed. But check 'em out online right now – it's a rich, wonder-filled website – to whet your appetite for when things get back to … uh … are we still calling it "normal," these days?
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    Vault Stone Shop: Saints & Intermediaries

    All praise! Here is the full exhibition of what Vault Stone Shop featured in their front window this summer: A visual conversation about the role of spiritual intermediaries in our modern society, explored via homage to St. Elmo (the patron saint of sailors and abdominal pain, btw) by seven superlative Austin artists. Yes, you can (safely) view the show in-person via appointment and witness up-close the wholly engaging creations of Elizabeth Chapin, Emma Hadzi Antich, CP Harrison, Meena Matocha, Hayley Morrison, Saul Jerome San Juan, and Meghan Shogan.
    Through Nov. 29
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    Wally Workman Gallery: Jen Garrido

    Garrido’s work depicts nature-based forms and rhythms as well as color and shapes, weighing ambiguity with representation, working with balance to reconnect with playfulness and youthful exuberance.
    Through Nov. 1
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    Women & Their Work: Brianna McIntyre

    "My goal at Women & Their Work," says Brianna McIntyre, "is to experiment with textile waste as a viable, usable, buildable material." Using a previous bent lamination shelf design as a template, she'll create structured forms that show the visual continuity and material evolution of the design.
    Through Dec. 12
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    Wyld Gallery

    This is Ray Donley's gallery of art by Native Americans, located Downtown and resplendent with creations from the original people of our struggling country.
    Call for appointment
Creative Opportunities
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    Atelier Dojo: Remote Studios

    The local powerhouse of figurative painting, the art school that's the smart school for artists of all kinds, they've got a painting-along-at-home series going to help you keep your skills honed in these socially restrictive times, featuring live costumed models posing on camera and a thriving community of creatives rendering that lovely human biotecture from their separate studios. "Join us for a three-hour costumed-model drawing session. Use any supplies you wish, listen to music, share your work, chat with others. It’s a great way to stay connected with your art community!"
    Tuesdays, 1:30-4:30pm; Fridays, 6:30-9:30pm; Saturdays, 9:30-12:30pm. $5.  
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    Call for Entries: ICOSA: Transmissions

    Artists Terra Goolsby and Tammie Rubin would like to collaborate with performing artists for an upcoming experimental exhibition at the ICOSA Collective gallery. And if you're a performing artist and don't know about the visual and textural wonders that Goolsby and Rubin create – but also somehow trust my judgment – lemme tell you: You do want to collaborate with whatever they're up to, if you have the chance. This time, you'll be helping them explore answers to questions like, "What’s performance without the expectations of the traditional “live” shared experiences? How do we create intimacy and connection mediated through limited audiences, projected, and virtual transmissions? Is it possible to trigger an emotive response through distance? By removing the audience from the process of making, what will you explore as an artist?"
    Deadline: Nov. 9  

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