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Visual Arts for Tue., Oct. 20
Events
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    Visual Arts

    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
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    The Blanton Museum: Curated Conversations

    This series explores and connects with the Blanton staff, streaming live every Tuesday at 5pm. The Blanton's collections are vast, as is the knowledge of these professionals. Click on over, we suggest, to enjoy a bit of both.
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    Weird Homes Tour: The Sand Dollar House

    You know how David and Chelle Neff of the Weird Homes Tour have, like so many others, taken the pandemic bull by the horns and gone vividly virtual with their projects, right? Just in time, too, as one of the most fascinating Austin homes this reporter's ever seen in three years of enjoying that tour – the Sand Dollar House, designed by John Covert Watson – will be featured in the latest livestreamed installment ... right before the house goes back on the market. That's right: Someone's gonna buy the iconic wonder, and who knows if the new owners will ever let an adoring public invade the structure again. Like they say, "If you're gonna tour just one weird home this year ..." You know what I mean? Recommended!
    Tue., Oct. 20, 6pm. $10.  
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    Women & Their Work: Red Dot Sale

    At the Red Dot Virtual Art Spree, you can purchase paintings, sculpture, drawings, and photography created by more than 60 of Texas' finest artists. Stella Alesi! Sandy Carson! Virginia Fleck! Calder Kamin! Claude Van Lingen! Denise Prince! (And, like we said, more!) Also, bid on an auction of unique experiences and creative getaways; join the curators online for lively conversations about collecting art; take virtual studio visits with Red Dot artists. This annual event will make your usual screen a more enjoyable experience - and proceeds will allow W&TW to introduce hundreds of underserved students in the Austin area to the joy and wonder of contemporary art.
    Through Nov. 2. $25-100.  
ONGOING
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    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
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    Art 84: Cornelius Carter

    This is a virtual preview of "Work in Progress" by Austin's Cornelius Carter, a work that "captures the struggles and glory of the African-American experience along with the artist’s faith in the American dream of equality and opportunity for all."
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    Bullock Texas State History Museum: This Light of Ours

    This show features images by activist photographers of the Civil Rights Movement, telling a visual story of the struggle against segregation, race-based disenfranchisement, and Jim Crow laws in the 1960s. These photos capture the day-to-day struggles of everyday citizens and their resolve in the face of violence and institutionalized discrimination – with more than a dozen additional images representing activism and protest in Austin's own history.
    Tuesdays-Sundays. Through Dec. 6
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    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity.
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    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
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    MACC Galleries: Reopened!

    The Community Gallery and the Sam Z. Coronado Gallery in the Mexican-American Cultural Center reopen "with social distancing and additional health and safety precautions in place," and inviting reservations to see "Rosy Campanita, El Camino del Corazon, The Path of the Heart," which documents 13 years of struggle, persistence, and resilience between 2003-2016, and "Poética Textil/ Textile Poems," in which contemporary artists reveal their restlessness, inquiry, and research into the creation of fabric art via printing, weaving, and assemblage.
    Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm. Donations accepted.  
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    Martha's Contemporary: Still Here

    Say, here's the inaugural show at Martha's new Guadalupe location – a powerful group exhibition featuring paintings, sculptures, and textiles by Jenaro Goode, Payton McGowen, Adrian Armstrong, Christina Ballentyne, Siena Smith, Alfonzo Gonzales Jr, Erick Medel, Sam Keller, and Alex Nguyen.
    Through Nov. 2. Tue.-Thu., noon-7pm; Fri.-Sat., noon-9pm
    4115 Guadalupe
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    Mexic-Arte Museum

    Day of the Dead In observance of the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos, Mexic-Arte Museum presents the 37th annual Day of the Dead exhibition, paying tribute to the tradition that celebrates the return of the dead, featuring community altars and a special showing of artwork from the Juan Antonio Sandoval Jr. Collection. ELA 25: Intersection: Shock & Relief This annual show, formally known as Young Latinx Artists, celebrates the last 25 years of exhibitions, featuring the work of emerging Latinx artists as curated by Dr. George Vargas and revealing two new murals on the museum’s exterior Fifth Street wall.
    Through Nov. 22
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    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
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    Northern-Southern: Baton

    This is a group show by relay, begun in July of 2020 as a method of socially distancing a community in the height of the pandemic: Artists took turns alone in the space, each adding to the exhibition. Now, as it nears its close, the exhibition resembles a community in which work converses and overlaps. With Adreon Henry, Vy Ngo, Dawn Okoro, Leon Alesi, Matt Steinke, Sev Coursen, Stella Alesi, and more.
    Closing reception: Sat., July 24, 3-9pm
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    Prizer Arts & Letters: Between Myth and Dream

    This new show features paintings and drawings completed since artist Mary Koniavitis migrated to the United States four years ago. The works merge mythology with memory and subconscious states of being, giving shape to, Koniavitis says, "forces that inhabit the realm of dreams and make visible universal myths, symbols, and archetypes that speak of our shared human experience and traverse time and place.” Make an appointment for an in-person viewing, or at least check out the Prizer front room – illuminated each night (8pm-12mid) – through the main window.
    Through Oct. 25. Free.  
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    Recspec Gallery: Superstitions

    The unstoppable Recspec presents a new virtual group show, curated by Laurel Barickman and Katie Cowden, featuring works by Annalise Gratovich, Holly Bobisuthi, Cathy Rylander, Kevin Munoz, Kämy Dobï, Pake Stephens, and more, addressing a theme of, well, listen: "In a year where it feels like Lady Luck has left us, jinxes abound, and a black cat has crossed our collective path, we've turned to rituals and superstitions to change our fortunes. Phrases, charms, and talismans – or numbers and actions to avoid – are deeply ingrained in our minds and habits, and we're looking forward to seeing how this group of artists influences our fate." As are we, reader – and how about you?
    Through Nov. 7
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    SAGE Studio: Home Makers

    SAGE Studio, dedicated to connecting contemporary artists with disabilities to Texas’ broader arts community, presents its first virtual exhibition featuring work from 18 artists with intellectual and developmental disabilities from across the world. The art for this show was created at home during quarantine, when so many artists had to quickly shift their practices, alongside home-themed pieces that were made prior to the pandemic. Note: Works are available for viewing (and buying) online.
    Through Oct. 31
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    SUFFRAGE NOW: A 19th Amendment Centennial Exhibition

    On August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote. On August 6, 2020, the Elisabet Ney Museum debuted this new show for which women photographers nationwide were invited to share photos that comment on the Centennial of the Ratification of the 19th Amendment. The most eloquent images were chosen and are included in this online exhibition.
    Through Jan. 31. Free.
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    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
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    The Blanton Museum of Art: Expanding Abstraction

    In the early 20th century, Western artists began exploring abstract, nonrepresentational forms for the first time. Several decades later, abstraction's practitioners experimented with new materials and techniques: Dripping, pouring, staining, and even slinging paint became common, as did the use of non-traditional media such as acrylic and industrial paints. Artists also ditched the flat, rectangular format to create sculptural texture and dimensionality. Now, can you guess whose corporate collection is particularly strong in such paintings of the 1960s and '70s? If you guessed "The Blanton Museum of Art," then you'll especially want to get an eyeful of this major new show, subtitled "Pushing the Boundaries of Painting in the Americas," organized by the venue's own Carter E. Foster.
    Through Jan. 10  
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    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
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    The Museum of Natural & Artificial Ephemerata

    This place, ah, it's one of our favorite places in the entire city; and of course they're properly corona-closed. But check 'em out online right now – it's a rich, wonder-filled website – to whet your appetite for when things get back to … uh … are we still calling it "normal," these days?
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    Umlauf Sculpture Garden

    The Umlauf reopens its famed Garden to the general public. There won’t be any performances going on yet, as occasionally delighted crowds in the Before Times, but there will be all those expertly wrought sculptures, the bronze or stone cynosures from Charles Umlauf and others anchoring sight among the bright gardenscapes and tree-towered paths: Perfect for a strolling, fresh-air respite from yet another screenful of pixels in your all-too-familiar abode.: Note: The usual safety measures will be in effect: A limit of 30 visitors in the garden at a time; a one-way marked path to follow; masks and social distancing strongly encouraged; etc. (You know the routine: You’re an old hand at this pandemic shit by now, right?) Also, know that the Umlauf’s private-event rentals will resume with limited capacity set by local and state guidelines – and its summer camp program will proceed with those restrictions in mind, too.: See the museum’s website for details and to schedule an appointment.
    Tue.-Fri., 10am-4pm; Sat.-Sun., 11am-4pm
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    Wally Workman Gallery: Jen Garrido

    Garrido’s work depicts nature-based forms and rhythms as well as color and shapes, weighing ambiguity with representation, working with balance to reconnect with playfulness and youthful exuberance.
    Through Nov. 1
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    Western Gallery: Texas Women

    This virtual art gallery curates distinct perspectives of the American West – abstract to photorealistic, classic to contemporary – and now reveals its new show that features work by Felice House, Arielle Austin, Alice Leese, Debbie Carroll, Anna-Sophia Lagos, Elizabeth Dryden, Dana Falconberry, Vic Gilmore, Chanel Kreuzer, Katelyn Betsill, Sirena LaBurn, and more.
    Closing reception (via Instagram): Sun., Oct. 25, 3-4pm  
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