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Visual Arts for Sat., July 4
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    Visual Arts

    A05 Gallery

    This popular gallery represents a wide array of artists, both local and international, with creations that span a dazzling plethora of mediums. Cynda Valle. Rachel Dory. John Morse. And – oh, give that website a quick look and you'll be making an appointment ASAP.
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    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
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    Blue Moon Glassworks

    Handmade glass art and jewelry.
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    Bullock Texas State History Museum: This Light of Ours

    This show features images by activist photographers of the Civil Rights Movement, telling a visual story of the struggle against segregation, race-based disenfranchisement, and Jim Crow laws in the 1960s. These photos capture the day-to-day struggles of everyday citizens and their resolve in the face of violence and institutionalized discrimination – with more than a dozen additional images representing activism and protest in Austin's own history.
    Tuesdays-Sundays. Through Dec. 6
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    Camiba Art: Signs

    Currently open by reservation only, yes, but you should have no reservations about seeing this stunning exhibition by Dallas native Lee Albert Hill. You want an eyeful of big, bright abstractions via acrylics on canvas over board, handwrought yet almost machinelike in their meticulous design and execution? You probably do, especially in this case. Because it's like … um … like if someone hired Mike Hinge and Bill Sienkewicz to show how well tangrams could be used to illustrate subatomic events from CERN's bubble chamber – and then threw a fistful of chaos shards at the collaboration's results. The accompanying image here is one miniaturized example; imagine seeing a roomful of such intricacies at full size. Hell, imagine scheduling a private viewing of this show with gallerist Troy Campa: That's some solid pandemic diversion right there, tell you what. (And your man Brenner rhapsodizes a bit further about it in this review.)
    Through July 11  
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    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity.
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    Collection Rert: Twyla Rhode

    This second installment of the collection's online Vertual Solo series features the work of 15-year-old Austinite Twyla Rhode.
    Through July 18. Free.  
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    grayDUCK Gallery: Point of Origin

    That's right! So make an appointment to check out this inventive array of creative work. (Note: Only five people allowed per appointment; no hugging, kissing, high-fiving, or even fist-bumping the gallerist.) But, look: Sarah Sudhoff's "Point of Origin" takes cues from the connections between sound and human emotion, here realized with suspended sculptures, sound installation, and debossed wall works that draw upon the artist's personal observations, cartography, and the mechanics of helicopters – especially those copters involved in the nearly 300 flights completed in just one month for Houston's Memorial Hermann Health System.
    Through July 12. Thu.-Sat., noon-6pm; Sun., noon-5pm
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    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
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    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
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    Northern-Southern: Baton

    This is a group show by relay, begun in July of 2020 as a method of socially distancing a community in the height of the pandemic: Artists took turns alone in the space, each adding to the exhibition. Now, as it nears its close, the exhibition resembles a community in which work converses and overlaps. With Adreon Henry, Vy Ngo, Dawn Okoro, Leon Alesi, Matt Steinke, Sev Coursen, Stella Alesi, and more.
    Closing reception: Sat., July 24, 3-9pm
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    Stephen L. Clark Gallery: Black Tulips and Dead Flowers

    This new show by acclaimed photographer Kate Breakey is focused on specimens of the plant kingdom and reveals itself like a series of windows into arcane botanical memories.
    Through Sept. 12, by appointment only
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    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
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    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
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    The Museum of Natural & Artificial Ephemerata

    This place, ah, it's one of our favorite places in the entire city; and of course they're properly corona-closed. But check 'em out online right now – it's a rich, wonder-filled website – to whet your appetite for when things get back to … uh … are we still calling it "normal," these days?
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    Umlauf Sculpture Garden

    The Umlauf reopens its famed Garden to the general public. There won’t be any performances going on yet, as occasionally delighted crowds in the Before Times, but there will be all those expertly wrought sculptures, the bronze or stone cynosures from Charles Umlauf and others anchoring sight among the bright gardenscapes and tree-towered paths: Perfect for a strolling, fresh-air respite from yet another screenful of pixels in your all-too-familiar abode.: Note: The usual safety measures will be in effect: A limit of 30 visitors in the garden at a time; a one-way marked path to follow; masks and social distancing strongly encouraged; etc. (You know the routine: You’re an old hand at this pandemic shit by now, right?) Also, know that the Umlauf’s private-event rentals will resume with limited capacity set by local and state guidelines – and its summer camp program will proceed with those restrictions in mind, too.: See the museum’s website for details and to schedule an appointment.
    Tue.-Fri., 10am-4pm; Sat.-Sun., 11am-4pm
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    Wyld Gallery

    This is Ray Donley's gallery of art by Native Americans, located Downtown and resplendent with creations from the original people of our struggling country.
    Call for appointment
Creative Opportunities

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