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Visual Arts for Wed., July 1
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    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
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    Butridge Gallery: Grimm Re-Articulated

    Yes, you have to make a reservation. Yes, it's totally worth it – because the Julia C. Butridge gallery in the Dougherty Arts Center reopens (in a limited manner, with social distancing and masks) with a show of work by three artists – Nora McMillen Burke, Jon Nelson, and Marianne Levy – and it's all worth feasting your peepers on. But we daresay it's Levy's "Grimm Re-Articulated," with its array of reimagined and stunningly sculpted fairytale characters and situations, that'll warp your dreams for months to come.
    Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm. Through July 25. Free.  
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    Camiba Art: Signs

    Currently open by reservation only, yes, but you should have no reservations about seeing this stunning exhibition by Dallas native Lee Albert Hill. You want an eyeful of big, bright abstractions via acrylics on canvas over board, handwrought yet almost machinelike in their meticulous design and execution? You probably do, especially in this case. Because it's like … um … like if someone hired Mike Hinge and Bill Sienkewicz to show how well tangrams could be used to illustrate subatomic events from CERN's bubble chamber – and then threw a fistful of chaos shards at the collaboration's results. The accompanying image here is one miniaturized example; imagine seeing a roomful of such intricacies at full size. Hell, imagine scheduling a private viewing of this show with gallerist Troy Campa: That's some solid pandemic diversion right there, tell you what. (And your man Brenner rhapsodizes a bit further about it in this review.)
    Through July 11  
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    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity. Note: The exhibition will be online for a year.
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    Collection Rert: Twyla Rhode

    This second installment of the collection's online Vertual Solo series features the work of 15-year-old Austinite Twyla Rhode.
    Through July 18. Free.  
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    Flatbed Press: Over My Head

    That Austin epicenter of the printing arts presents a new exhibition of woodcuts by Ben Muñoz, featuring his series called The Endless Endeavor. These stunning woodcuts are 100-by-52-inches, the massive pieces communicating both in scale and content the idea of life being larger and much more than ourselves. Flatbed and Muñoz "are eager for the artist and individuals to talk about the content of his work one-on-one;" reserve your meeting with the artist for July 24 or July 25; other appointments for multigenerational groups of four or fewer can be scheduled here.
    Through July 29. Wed.-Fri., 10am-5pm. Free.  
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    grayDUCK Gallery: Point of Origin

    That's right! So make an appointment to check out this inventive array of creative work. (Note: Only five people allowed per appointment; no hugging, kissing, high-fiving, or even fist-bumping the gallerist.) But, look: Sarah Sudhoff's "Point of Origin" takes cues from the connections between sound and human emotion, here realized with suspended sculptures, sound installation, and debossed wall works that draw upon the artist's personal observations, cartography, and the mechanics of helicopters – especially those copters involved in the nearly 300 flights completed in just one month for Houston's Memorial Hermann Health System.
    Through July 12. Thu.-Sat., noon-6pm; Sun., noon-5pm
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    ICOSA: Coping Mechanisms

    In advance of the upcoming Swec & Criscoe exhibition, ICOSA presents a series of front-window installations that are viewable 24 hours a day. "An imperfect show in imperfect times that recognizes our shortcomings and missteps, our pain, loneliness, and uncertainty, that aims to move forward carefully and intentionally. This work was made during the pandemic, but before the world exploded once again in response to the horrific murder of George Floyd, thrusting the world into a greater awareness of systemic racism and police brutality, and renewing energy and momentum in the fight for justice." Note: A portion of the proceeds from sales of the artworks will be donated to Six Square: Austin’s Black Cultural District.
    Through July 2
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    Lora Reynolds Gallery Online

    Rarefied and clever, oblique and brilliant, sometimes blatant as a slap of vivid beauty upside your skull, often just what your rods and cones are craving by way of stimulation. Natalie Frank? The Haas Brothers? Tony Marsh? Yes, and more.
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    Lora Reynolds Gallery: Time and Again

    Carl Hammoud’s exhibition of paintings was open for only a few short weeks before the COVID-19 lockdown; now the gallery's open again (limited capacity, masks required, appointments recommended) and you can still catch the show before it closes this weekend.
    Through July 3. Wed.-Sat., 11am-6pm
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    MACC Galleries: Reopened!

    The Community Gallery and the Sam Z. Coronado Gallery in the Mexican-American Cultural Center reopen "with social distancing and additional health and safety precautions in place," and inviting reservations to see "Rosy Campanita, El Camino del Corazon, The Path of the Heart," which documents 13 years of struggle, persistence, and resilience between 2003-2016, and "Poética Textil/ Textile Poems," in which contemporary artists reveal their restlessness, inquiry, and research into the creation of fabric art via printing, weaving, and assemblage.
    Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm. Donations accepted.  
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    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
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    Stephen L. Clark Gallery: Black Tulips and Dead Flowers

    This new show by acclaimed photographer Kate Breakey is focused on specimens of the plant kingdom and reveals itself like a series of windows into arcane botanical memories.
    Through Sept. 12, by appointment only
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    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
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    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
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    The Museum of Natural & Artificial Ephemerata

    This place, ah, it's one of our favorite places in the entire city; and of course they're properly corona-closed. But check 'em out online right now – it's a rich, wonder-filled website – to whet your appetite for when things get back to … uh … are we still calling it "normal," these days?
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    Wally Workman Gallery: Poster Show

    Now here's some gorgeous and affordable visuals for anybody's favorite wall: A new series of 20-by-16-inch posters celebrating the creations of Workman-repped artists – Malcolm Bucknall! Ashley Benton! Helmut Barnett! Ian Shults! Those amazing Scribners! And many more! – with funds going to support those artists. Give it a look-see on the website.
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    Wally Workman Gallery: Reopened!

    Make an appointment, friend, and you can see these beauties in person. And if there's anything (aside from certain substances still criminalized by a failed system of law) that can elevate the senses and lighten the load, it's this bright collection of new works by Austin's Patrick Puckett. The artist's "large, bold canvases explore the human figure inspired by the artist’s life in the American South and often include symbolic references of both real and imagined nostalgia." And, we add, the downright Fauvist, polychrome exuberance of these paintings will likewise inspire your art-hungry eyes.
    Through July 3
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    Women & Their Work Online: 42 Years

    Did they say "42 years of contemporary art by women in our online archive," citizen? Yes, they did – and we recommend feasting your binge-weary eyes on what this excellent downtown gallery has to reward your clicks with.
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    Yard Dog: Blacklight Paintings

    Yard Dog's robust site has a new show of bold visuals by Steve "Dream Syndicate" Wynn – painted to shift under blacklight – and the latest complex monochrome wonderments of Jon Langford's Song Paintings series.

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