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Visual Arts for Fri., Aug. 23
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    Visual Arts

    Art for the People: Adventure, Fantasy, and Fun

    Here's an exhibition – adventurous, fantastic, and let's not forget fun – by 57 Texas-based artists, featuring a diversity of styles and mediums.
    Through Oct. 5
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    Visual Arts

    Artifacts of Human Trafficking

    Artists around the world have created works in a variety of media, based on the words desperation, isolation, and deceit, for this show curated by Austin's own Amie Stone King.
    Through Sept. 15
    Shepherd of the Hills, 3525 Bee Caves Rd
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    Visual Arts

    Atelier 1205: Crossings

    Cindy Stapper’s contemporary landscape paintings reflect her fascination with elemental forces and the unexpected associations and subtle contrasts present in nature. Stapper builds paintings using oil, cold wax, powdered pigments, and natural materials that are layered and excavated to reveal hidden depths of color and texture.
    Through Aug. 30
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    Visual Arts

    Blanton Museum of Art: Mapping Memory

    This Rosario I. Granados-curated exhibition features a selection of maps – known as Mapas de las Relaciones Geográficas, created by indigenous artists around 1580 – to expand our perspective on what happened when Spanish explorer Hernando Cortés invaded Mexico.
    Through Aug. 25  
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    Visual Arts

    Blanton Museum of Art: This Is the Day

    This new show highlights new developments in Jeffrey Gibson’s genre-bridging practice, with 50 works made between 2014 and 2018 – including intricately beaded wall-hangings and punching bags, paintings, ceramics, garments, helmets, and a new video commissioned for this exhibition.
    Through Sept. 29  
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    Visual Arts

    Camiba Art: Studio Scene 3

    You know that the globetrotting instigators of Austin's Camiba Art offer cultural tours all around the world, right? Now here's the third annual exhibition of art by artists visited during the most recent series of travels, representing more than 25 artists from four countries and nine regions therein. Featuring new works from Cuba, Mexico, Guatemala, and Peru.
    Through Aug. 31  
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    Visual Arts

    Co-Lab Projects: Highs and Lo-Fi’s

    This is an exhibition by Adrian Armstrong, exploring the topic of mental health in African-American culture, encompassing the artist's personal struggles and a discussion about why mental health is often a taboo topic in the culture he was raised in. Note: Visitors are encouraged to bring an internet-capable device and headphones to listen to the musical components of the show; free Wi-Fi is available on-site.
    Through Aug. 31
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    Visual Arts

    Cowboys in Space and Fantastic Worlds

    Yippee ki yay, space cadet, it's time to head 'em off at the Pass Nebula as the State History Museum presents an exhibition that spans more than 150 years of Western and science fiction history and features 100-plus artifacts (including props from Star Trek, Star Wars, Firefly, and other skiffy media fare). And our arch-geek himself, the estimable Richard Whittaker, also a part-time Sith Lord, reviews the show for you here.
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    Visual Arts

    Davis Gallery: Circadian Buzz

    This is one extensive group exhibit focused on repetition and daily practice, for which each of the participating artists has created a new work or carefully chosen a work from the past. And we mean, these are some of the most fascinating artists who ever breathed our city's air – Steve Brudniak, Malou Flato, Denise M. Fulton, Jan Heaton, David Leonard, Randall Reid, Caprice Pierucci, John Sager, Chun Hui Pak, and many more. So, even if visiting galleries isn't part of your, ah, daily practice, you'll be well rewarded by checking out Davis Gallery's array of visual creations.
    Through Aug. 31
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    Visual Arts

    Dimension Gallery: I, Too, Am

    This new exhibition by ceramicist Tammie Rubin cites Langston Hughes’ 1926 poem, "I, Too," a work that itself references Walt Whitman’s "I Sing the Body Electric." Here Rubin turns the gallery into an immersive installation of rock formations, mesas, mountains, and hills, as carved from construction foam and enveloped in resin, juxtaposing the majestic grandeur of the varied American landscape with how those same inspired ideas of vastness and expansion often fall short for its citizens. Recommended.
    Through Sept. 22
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    Visual Arts

    Elisabet Ney Museum: Different Worlds

    This is a solo exhibition by Leslie Kell, about whose digitally manipulated photography we've fairly raved, because she does it so well and frequently handcrafts and embellishes the frames she displays it in. For this show, in addition to her typical graphic deconstructions of nature and so on, Kell's created at least one work using images of the Ney's own sculptural inventory. It's never a poor idea to visit this Hyde Park gem of a venue, and right now it's an even better idea than usual.
    Through Sept. 1
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    Visual Arts

    grayDUCK Gallery: The Crit Group

    This new group exhibition at grayDUCK features a wide range of new work by eight artists – Veronica Ceci, Madeline Irvine, Paloma Mayorga, Virginia Lee Montgomery, Michael Jay Muelhaupt, Manik Raj Nakra, Matthew Steinke and Jenn Wilson – who participated in the Contemporary Austin's Crit Group, an eight-month-long program supporting artistic growth through monthly critiques and professional development workshops.
    Through Aug. 25
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    Visual Arts

    ICOSA: Rhumb Line

    New work by Amy Bench and Jenn Wilson explores how narratives are structured: always appearing to move forward, yet occasionally twisting and bending, obscuring parts of the story. Filmmaker Bench addresses the often contradictory feelings associated with childbirth and early motherhood; painter Wilson invokes narrative via weaving stills from bygone television flops, found photography, memories, comic panels, and images from Song dynasty scrolls.
    Through Sept. 14
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    Visual Arts

    Leona Gallery: Woodaversary

    Chaos Woods celebrates their fifth year in business, bringing some of their favorite artists and musicians together for a show featuring the art of Harry Angel, Beachwalker Boxes, Chaos Woods, Scott Rolfe, and Linda Wandt.
    Closing reception: Sun., Aug. 25, 1-5pm  
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    Visual Arts

    Mexic-Arte Muesum: Young Latinx Artists 24

    This 24th annual exhibition is, as ever, dedicated to the professional development of emerging Latina/o/x artists and curators, with Tatiane Santa Rosa bringing together the works of eleven Latina/o/x artists defining Buen Vivir.
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    Visual Arts

    Recspec Gallery: The Nude Show

    That excellent Austin gallery, gone missing since the old Flatbed World HQ closed months ago? It's popping up at MOHA with a new show about "nude, as a color, as its cultural perception finally shifts away from the upsetting pinky Band-aid and crayon-box infamy." Curated by Holly Bobisuthi (who is, did you know, the most exciting jewelry maker in this city if not the entire goddam state) and featuring diverse work by artists from all over the country (and Spain), this is an exhibition sure to open wide in delight any previously jaded eyes.
    Through Aug. 31  
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    Visual Arts

    SouthPop: Shoot Like a GRRRL

    This exhibit showcases the work of Martha Grenon, one of Austin's premier music photographers, her images capturing the excitement of bands performing in Austin since the early Eighties.
    Through Sept. 28
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    Visual Arts

    Susanna Dickinson Museum: Notes from the Border

    The photographer Ilana Panich-Linsman gives us a small glimpse into the lives of those detained and displaced, via images captured on the U.S.-Mexican Border.
    Through Sept. 22
    411 E. Fifth
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    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum: She-Wolf + Lower Figs

    This installation presents new work that expands Lily Cox-Richard’s research into the contextual history of materials, making visible unseen systems that dictate materials’ production, value, and use, and engages larger questions of natural resources, labor, the specifics of place, and the politics of viewership.
    Through Dec. 29  
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    Visual Arts

    The Museum of Natural & Artificial Ephemerata

    This place, ah, it's one of our favorite places in the entire city; and of course they're properly corona-closed. But check 'em out online right now – it's a rich, wonder-filled website – to whet your appetite for when things get back to … uh … are we still calling it "normal," these days?
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    Visual Arts

    The People's Gallery: Exhibition 2019

    Here's the 15th annual exhibition at Austin City Hall, presenting a wide array of painting, sculpture, drawing, and other media by 113 local artists. This year, the exhibition includes a special selection of photographs: The Bold Beauty Project of Texas, featuring images of Texas women with disabilities taken by photographers from across the state.
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    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: America Martin

    You know the Workman Gallery loves this Los Angeles-based painter whose work is inspired by form and figure as depicted by the Impressionists and Modernists of the early 20th century, right? Thus, this seventh solo exhibition at the excellent Westside venue.
    Through Sept. 1
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    Visual Arts

    Women & Their Work: Hauntings

    Each of Shana Hoehn's large sculptures consists of two women, either as a double or camouflaged in one form through double imagery, inspired by the sexualized female archetypes sourced from ship figureheads, hood ornaments, carnival portraiture, pinups painted on WWII aircraft, and horror films. Note: The Chronicle's Robert Faires recently paid a visit to the gallery, and this is his response to the show.
    Through Sept. 5
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    Visual Arts

    Yard Dog: Art from the Heart & Medulla Oblongata

    Bruce Lee Webb of Waxahachie, Texas, is a folk art gallerist and an antique dealer and in his travels he collects vintage cotton sacks and journal paper on which he then paints and draws. That's putting it mildly. That's without saying, "Whoa, damn, don't miss this terrific show at Randy Franklin's excellent gallery there on South Congress." Need we remind you, it was Webb's collection that was responsible for the most amazing show in the too-brief history of the gallery of Domy Books back in the day? Recommended, recommended, recommended.
    Through Aug. 31

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