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Visual Arts for Wed., March 20
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    Visual Arts

    AARC: Let the Colors Speak

    Rashmi Thakur and Supriya Kharod, both born in India and both proud Austinites now, document their individual journeys through watercolor and acrylic paintings, depicting the colorful traditions, vibrant life, and diverse culture found in the two communities they love.
    Through March 30  
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    AgavePrint: How Life Is

    Graham Dickie’s photographs of hip-hop in rural Southeast Louisiana approach Southern rap with "a grassroots, humanistic perspective, focusing on aspiring artists and how their music relates to their communities and everyday lives."
    Through March 29
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    Ai Weiwei Sculptures Now In Your City!

    The Contemporary Austin and Waller Creek Conservancy present a free public event to celebrate the unveiling of two monumental sculptures by Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei. The mesmerizing Forever Bicycle is at the Waller Delta, 74 Trinity. And Iron Tree Trunk is on view at Laguna Gloria, 3809 W. 35th.
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    Angela Shelf Medearis: Our People

    During 2018, Medearis – known to millions as The Kitchen Diva – donated several books, manuscripts, photographs, awards, and research papers to the Carver Museum. Now, they’ve been curated and presented as this new exhibition.
    Through June 23
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    Visual Arts

    Art for the People: Robots in Rowboats

    The colorful artwork of Lauren Briére escorts the viewer on a visual journey into outer space, the fun of sports, walks in nature, adventures in rowboats, and more – with robots.
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    Atelier 1205: Paper Fields

    This show unites the work of Austin art educators Kiley Grantges and Jennifer Schroeder. Grantges elevates drinking straws and office copy paper into bas-relief arrays; Schroeder reconstitutes the exuberant mess resulting from her young students’ art explorations into paper mosaics.
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    Big Medium: No Me Olvides

    The venerable anchor of Canopy presents a new show, curated by Fernando Muñoz, by eight local established Latino artists. Through art, music, poetry, and food, these stories build a narrative of happiness, melancholy, sadness, and hope. And these artists are Alejandra Almuelle, JC Amorrortu, Cecilia Colomé, Fidencio Durán, Carlos Lowry, Peter F. Ortiz, Elvira Sarmiento, and Liliana Wilson.
    Through March 30
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    Carver Museum: Constant Escape

    Founding members of the Austin-based Black Mountain ProjectAdrian Aguilera, Betelhem Makonnen, and Tammie Rubin – debut a new body of work in sculpture, photography, text, and, video. Also on display at the Carver: Re-Membering is the Responsibility of the Living, an installation by Taja Lindley.
    Through July 27
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    Davis Gallery: A Shared Vision

    There are about as many "shared visions" as there are pairs of eyeballs in this miserable world, of course, but this show's title is intended to embody the greater meaning of the phrase and – the important part, here – it titles a collection of artwork by Denise M. Fulton and Sam Yeates. The vision of either of those local artists, and the skill each exerts in rendering that vision visible to the rest of us, is nigh on incredible. And now here are new paintings from both of them? You can pretty much disregard all the hype about Virtual Reality going on at SXSW right now, because these modern fabulists Fulton and Yeates are capturing – via oldschool tech like pigments and brushes, imagine that! – realities (and fantasies) sufficient to fuel any immersive dreams for years to come.
    Through April 13
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    Elisabet Ney Museum: Women of Flatbed

    This part of Print Austin features work by leading female figures from the past and future of Austin's own Flatbed Press, including Alice Leora Briggs, Suzi Davidoff, Sandra C. Fernández, Annalise Natasha Gratovich, Sandria Hu, Sharon Kopriva, Mary McCleary, Melissa Miller, Celia Munoz, Liliana Porter, Linda Ridgway, Julie Speed, Sydney Yeager, and more. And, oh look, our Robert Faires gives you a fine preview right here.
    Through April 28  
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    Georgetown Art Center: Floating Points

    Up there in G-town they've got a sharp exhibition of seven artists offering separate perspectives on digital creativity, their different philosophies of the artist-computer interface expressed in works: as varied as the creators themselves. Featuring new pieces by Leslie Kell, Thomas Athey, Charles Heppner, Tyler Hobbs, Chalda Maloff, Paul McGuire, and Shirley Steele.
    Through March 24
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    Guzu Gallery: Princess Power!

    Note the emphasis: not Princess Power, but Princess Power. Which is to say, here's a show with more than 20 artists paying tribute to a diverse selection of pop-culture princess characters, via limited-edition prints and original artwork.
    Through March 24
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    Visual Arts

    Harry Ransom Center: The Rise of Everyday Design

    Here's a new and detailed look at the history of the Arts and Crafts movement in Britain and America, showing how it transformed the homes and lives of ordinary people and how it continues to influence modern design.
    Through July 14
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    La Peña Gallery: Mujeres De Luz

    You're invited to celebrate International Women's Day with this group exhibition by women artists, featuring work by Alondra Acosta, Ana Borne, Cecilia Colomé, Veronica Castillo, Juanita Cole Towery, Naxieli Gomez Traub, Theresa Ibañez, Scherezade García, Iliana Emilia García, Mary Jane Garza, Yleana Martínez, Leticia Mosqueda, Farah Rivera, Victoria Rivero, Teresa Scott, Julia Santos Solomon, Elvira Sarmiento, Emily Socolov, Rama Tiru, Jackie Welch, and Terry Ybañez.
    Reception: Fri., March 8, 6-8pm
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    Lora Reynolds Gallery: Listening Closely

    Where do we come from? Where are we going? Is there a bigger something out there that will always be out of reach? (And what might it mean to try to connect with it?) The artists in this show listen closely to their materials, history, the land, and the stars – and often end up hearing things they did not expect. Bonus: New works by Jong Oh in the Project Room.
    Through March 23
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    Neill-Cochran House: Joy and Delight

    Lu Ann Barrow's artistic career has spanned seven decades from her 1956 MFA at UT through the present day, her paintings depicting the joys and sorrows of communal life in the south.
    Through April 28
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    Por Fin: Impresiónes y Expresiónes de México

    Cat Quintanilla presents a solo exhibition of sculptures, photography, and block prints, reflecting the artist's focus for a future that is diverse and rich with her family’s Mexican culture.
    Through March 23
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    Visual Arts

    Raw Paw Gallery: Notes From a Windowless Room

    "These paintings," says Nadia Waheed, "are an effort to form a bridge between my Pakistani heritage and my westernization, primarily by exploring the brown female nude." Several large works by Waheed adorn the delightful Raw Paw space over there in the Yard on St. Elmo, and – tell you what – if every creative "effort" were as well-wrought and lovely to behold as these paintings, the whole world would be a better place to have eyes in.
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    Stephen L. Clark Gallery: Flowers

    In which acclaimed collagist Lance Letscher focuses his prodigious paper-manipulating skills on botanicals and the gallery's walls become a bright garden of delights.
    Through April 13
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    Texas State History Museum: Texas From Above

    Here's an original exhibition featuring aerial images captured by photographer Jay B. Sauceda during a six-day flying journey around the state. This show highlights the beauty of Texas borderlands and explores the process of capturing the images.
    Through June 16
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    The Blanton Museum: Zulu Time

    This new solo exhibition of two-dimensional and sculptural works by Brooklyn native Kambui Olujimi, now on view in the Blanton's Contemporary Project gallery, will revitalize your awareness of what's coordinated and universal.
    Through July 14
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    The Blanton: The Living Need Light, The Dead Need Music

    This film by The Propeller Group, an artist collective based in Vietnam and California, combines actual footage and staged portrayals of Vietnamese funeral rituals that shift dramatically from documentary to poetic.
    Through May 26  
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    The People's Gallery: Exhibition 2019

    Here's the 15th annual exhibition at Austin City Hall, presenting a wide array of painting, sculpture, drawing, and other media by 113 local artists. This year, the exhibition includes a special selection of photographs: The Bold Beauty Project of Texas, featuring images of Texas women with disabilities, taken by photographers from across the state.
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    Twyla Contemporary Art

    “It changes the room and really makes the house.” The new in-house gallery of these fine-art promoters boasts a diverse roster of artists and includes work by Austin-based Terra Goolsby and Rebecca Rothfus Harrell. See website for stylish details.
    209 W. Ninth
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    Umlauf Sculpture Garden: With Out, With In

    If you're standing at the crossroads of wood and sculpture, one of the talented giants you'll see landmarking that intersection will be James Surls. If you're at the Umlauf Sculpture Garden and Museum for this new show, you'll be amazed by more than 30 of that maestro's works – many of his iconic, surrealistic wooden creations as well as a few of his giant steel and bronze structures. Note: This is, surprisingly, Surls' first solo exhibition of sculptures in Austin.
    Through Aug. 18. The reception's free, but RSVP.  
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    Visual Arts Center: Fall 2018

    View the new exhibitions brightening this premier UT-based visual arts space here in the fall of 2018: "Lan Tuazon: In the Land of Real Shadows," "Exploring the Arctic Ocean," "Like the Lonely Traveler: Video Works by María Magdalena Campos-Pons," "Another Green World," and "Sit: Designs by Charles and Ray Eames."
    Free.  
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    Wally Workman Gallery: Deconstructing Nostalgia

    Elizabeth Chapin’s work references her Southern upbringing and the conflicted nostalgia surrounding the gentility and graciousness of the South. "Chapin views much of this culture as made possible largely by graceless and dark systems. This obfuscation of ugliness and the worship of appearance is the theme that runs throughout her new body of work." Ayup. Now, how about a large array of exemplary fauvist portraits, sometimes embellished by frames of tulle or active neon twisted like wild yarn? This fierce combo sizzles like angel spit on a griddle, makes eyes take wing. Recommended.
    Through March 31
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    Women & Their Work: Walk the Sky

    Bumin Kim's thread and string become the media to explore many of the same questions usually investigated with paint, examining the nature of line beyond the two-dimensional surface into three-dimensional space.
    Through April 18
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    Visual Arts

    Words/Matter: Latin American Art and Language

    Drawn primarily from the Blanton’s extensive collection of Latin American art, this exhibition offers an innovative perspective on how artists of the region have explored the links between visual art and written language since the early decades of the twentieth century, with examples ranging from Alejandro Xul Solar and Joaquín Torres-García’s creation of alphabets and metaphysical signs, to the visual experiments of Brazilian concrete poets in the 1960s, and the political codification of language by conceptualists since the 1970s.
    Through May 26
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    Yard Dog: City and Sky

    The work of Chicago-based artist, illustrator, and muralist Nate Otto occupies its own lane somewhere in between the worlds of folk art, street art, lowbrow art, and contemporary fine art. And now a rich portion of it will occupy this popular South Congress gallery.
    Through April 14
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