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for Wed., May 12
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  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Visual Arts Center: Small Refusals

    This is a three-woman exhibition featuring work by students from UT's 2021 Studio Art MFA graduating class: Magdalena Jarkowiec, Heather Canterbury, and Ania Mininkova. Uncanny experiences in Home Depot aisles, found diaries, and mythologies of the American landscape are revisited in sculpture, photography, and video works for a show that celebrates the everyday as a sea of unexamined alternatives to dominant narratives. Recommended: There's an Artist Talk via Zoom on Fri., May 7, 5pm.
    Through May 23. Wed.-Sat., noon-5pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ICOSA's Window Dressing XI: Unruly Waters Insult the Shore

    This latest of ICOSA's everchanging front-window displays of creative expression is a tableau that "explores ideas of blurred boundaries and futility of containment by depicting the grotesque as the embodiment of conflict between art and nature." As rendered by Austin's own Big Chicken & Baby Bird, it's sure to be a vivid if fleeting addition to the many visuals at Canopy.
    Through May 17. Reception: Fri., May 14, 7-9pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Northern-Southern: Baton

    This is a group show by relay, begun in July of 2020 as a method of socially distancing a community in the height of the pandemic: Artists took turns alone in the space, each adding to the exhibition. Now, as it nears its close, the exhibition resembles a community in which work converses and overlaps. With Adreon Henry, Vy Ngo, Dawn Okoro, Leon Alesi, Matt Steinke, Sev Coursen, Stella Alesi, and more.
    Closing reception: Sat., July 24, 3-9pm
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Street Corner Arts: The Spin

    The Street Corner production of Spenser Davis' new modern drama, performed live for several shows night after night, is now available in recorded form online.
    Through May 15. $3.  
  • Arts

    Classical Music

    TEMP: Tales from the Decameron

    For its final video concert of the season, the Texas Early Music Project presents stories from an extremely timely source: The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio, a book of tales told by a group of young adults escaping the Black Death during the 1348 epidemic by sheltering in a villa just outside Florence. KMFA’s Sara Schneider provides a bit of historical background to The Decameron and the music of the period, then the action begins and we catch up with the intrepid group of plague-fleeing characters, accompanied with music composed by Gherardello da Firenze, Lorenzo da Firenze, Francesco Landini, and more.Still not convinced that this is a sonic wonderment perfectly suited to herald our exit from history's latest pandemic? Still thinking that this concert is something other than early-music glory so divinely embodied that it'll thrill anything you have that even resembles a soul? Doubt no more.Point one: The librettist is Wellesley College's Dr. Larry Rosenwald. Point two: These tales are narrated by Austin's own Marc Pouhé. Final point to, as they say, seal the deal: This preview trailer.Conclusion: Danny Johnson, you're a mensch.
    May 8-13. $5-50.  
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  • Arts

    Theatre

    A Portrait of My Mother

    An artist remembers their mother, spinning a modern Mexican Cinderella tale as we follow the trials and tribulations of one woman's journey into motherhood – from her humble beginnings in the town of Laredo, Texas, to her journey to Chicago, and everything between. Written and performed by Carlo Lorenzo Garcia, directed by David R. Jarrott. Note: Now available for viewing on Vimeo.
    Through July 31. $5.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    Ballet Austin: Classes

    Learn your way to physical grace with a dance class at Ballet Austin. There are so many varieties to choose among – ballet, barre, contemporary dance, hip-hop, tap, cardio dance fitness, Pilates, and more – and all taught by professional instructors. See website for details.
    $3-7 per class.  
  • Arts

    Books

    Books, Books, Books in ATX

    Don’t forget, citizen: The best place to get your reading material is from Austin’s own Malvern Books or Half Price Books or Black Pearl Books or BookPeople or BookWoman or Reverie Books stores – in person or online. (And for the ultimate in vintage collectors’ editions and unique works on paper, we recommend the excellent South Congress Books.)Or try Bookshop.org in general – because Bookshop, unlike the online behemoth named after a river, shares the profits among all its independent-bookstore members.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Camiba Art: Since Last We Met

    What do you get when you rescue a discarded Leclerc table loom from the curb during a neighborhood walk? If you're acclaimed ceramic artist Jen Rose, you use the knowledge you gained about weaving in college and you integrate that weaving into your porcelain practice. What do you get if you visit Rose's latest show of works, now on display at this fine gallery? An eyeful of sculptural creations, threaded multiples, that are hung, draped, twisted, and manipulated toward a pattern-rich kinesis. This show, tell you what, it's sublime.
    Through May 15
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity.
  • Arts

    Comedy

    ColdTowne

    "Set your dial to CTTV for at-home entertainment seven nights a week on ColdTowne’s Twitch channel, featuring experimental improv, live podcasts, scripted readings, guest characters, and more." And they've got in-person shows popping up around town, too – Violet Crown Clubhouse, anyone? – so see that website for details.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Collective Voices

    Caroline Walker, a multidisciplinary artist who incorporates an augmented reality component into much of her work, brings together the voices of community members distanced due to COVID-19 through outdoor art installations at several local venues.
    Through May 13  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Davis Gallery: Nuevo Mundo

    Now here's a show that's well worth seeing: The new exhibition from Gladys Poorte, displaying paintings and drawings of a new world populated with unknown peoples, animals, and plants. A world rife with untold treasures and dangers. A place, as wrought so colorfully by Poorte, that it might've been the homeworld for that legendary Codex Seraphinianus.
    Through June 12
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lora Reynolds Gallery: Twenty-Eight Skies

    Witness these large new works on paper by Jason Middlebrook, in the artist's fifth show at the gallery. "Much of this work can be imagined as bearing witness to a mortal struggle between man and nature," say the gallery notes, "a struggle between frenetic geometric patterns and the humble flora we too often overlook and take for granted."
    Through June 19
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Mexic-Arte Museum: Mexico, the Border, and Beyond

    Mexic-Arte Museum presents an exhibition of selections from the Juan Antonio Sandoval Jr. collection, an array of work that is considered one of the most important Latinx art collections in the United States.
    Through May 30
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Recspec Gallery: Quarantine Drawings

    New drawings created during pandemic quarantine by that maestro of color and balance, Adrian Landon Brooks.
    Through May 31  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    SAGE Studio: Spring Work

    Here's a two-person exhibition featuring the work of Dallas-based abstract painter Charlie French alongside the vibrant pastel drawings of Austin's own Emily Dodson. The work is "a visual representation of the season as well as the collective rebirth many are feeling as the weather warms and things begin to lighten."
    Through May 31
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton: From the Collection of Jack Shear

    In 1999, the photographer and art collector Jack Shear co-organized an exhibition at New York’s Drawing Center: "Drawn from Artist’s Collections." This new show at the Blanton is curated by Shear "in an exploratory, free-flowing manner in which the forms, compositions and colors on the sheets respond to one another in a playful, non-traditional hang."
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Weird Homes Tour Returns!

    The Weird Homes Tour founded by Chelle and David J. Neff, having successfully expanded to other cities in this great, weird country of ours – and having hooked up with those arcane magisters of Atlas Obscura – now returns to its Austin birthplace to offer a series of high-quality videos that you can watch whenever you want for a week (through May 15). View one house a day, or, hell, binge all seven of the kooky, enchanting, funky, and one-of-a-kind homes at once. Then, on Sat., May 15, join in for a livestreamed panel with many of the homeowners, where you can ask all those questions that've been tugging at the sleeves of your skull. (Note: You think it's weird that a skull would have sleeves? Then you totally need to see these houses.) Bonus: 10% of ticket sales are donated to LifeWorks.
    Through May 15. $25-45.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Spring and All

    "Patrick Puckett's paintings are known for their bold colors and strong leisurely figures, executed with confident interaction between paint application, shape, color and texture." Like, the feeling you get when you've had your second vaccine, and you've suffered through that One Day of Bleh, and now, even though there's still a pandemic going on, you feel so much safer and ready to take on the world again, just as things are starting to reopen and spring is launching into its brightest phase of green beauty before summer comes a-blazing down our paths again? That feeling? This show – Puckett's work in general – captures that feeling. Welcome yourself back to Austin, we suggest, at the Workman Gallery sometime this month.
    Through May 29

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