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for Tue., May 11
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  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Weird Homes Tour Returns!

    The Weird Homes Tour founded by Chelle and David J. Neff, having successfully expanded to other cities in this great, weird country of ours – and having hooked up with those arcane magisters of Atlas Obscura – now returns to its Austin birthplace to offer a series of high-quality videos that you can watch whenever you want for a week (May 8-15). View one house a day, or, hell, binge all seven of the kooky, enchanting, funky, and one-of-a-kind homes at once. Then, on Sat., May 15, join in for a livestreamed panel with many of the homeowners, where you can ask all those questions that've been nagging at the sleeves of your skull. (Note: You think it's weird that a skull would have sleeves? Then you totally need to see these houses.) Bonus: 10% of ticket sales are donated to LifeWorks.
    May 8-15. $25-45.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Davis Gallery: Nuevo Mundo

    Now here's a show that's well worth seeing: The new exhibition from Gladys Poorte, displaying paintings and drawings of a new world populated with unknown peoples, animals, and plants. A world rife with untold treasures and dangers. A place, as wrought so colorfully by Poorte, that it might've been the homeworld for that legendary Codex Seraphinianus.
    Through June 12
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Heroic Dose

    Surely those Rude Mechs aren't planning on treating everyone to a hit of acid on Bicycle Day, right? Surely this latest multimedia, assorted-deliveries, unique community engagement project of theirs will only suggest or roughly replicate the effects of that psychedelic experience? Although who the fuck knows, these days? Especially since this is the award-winning, wholly entertaining, and paradigm-twisting Rudes we're talking about? Listen: "We will create an artistic circle of insight in which members will receive messages, signs, experiences, medicine, prayers, happenings and access to insights now and thru the near and far futures. These communications will begin but not be limited to the USPS, electronic mail, phone calls, gatherings, bonfires, scripture, visitations and visions. This ceremony does not promise us absolute truth. However, art can arise throughout our journeys and change can follow as that art is integrated into our daily lives in this urban jungle." Our professional recommendation: Get on it, voyager.
    It's already begun and it runs until, oh god, it could really be whatever. Pay what you can.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ICOSA's Window Dressing XI: Unruly Waters Insult the Shore

    This latest of ICOSA's everchanging front-window displays of creative expression is a tableau that "explores ideas of blurred boundaries and futility of containment by depicting the grotesque as the embodiment of conflict between art and nature." As rendered by Austin's own Big Chicken & Baby Bird, it's sure to be a vivid if fleeting addition to the many visuals at Canopy.
    May 10-17. Reception: Fri., May 14, 7-9pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Recspec Gallery: Quarantine Drawings

    New drawings created during pandemic quarantine by that maestro of color and balance, Adrian Landon Brooks.
    Debuting on Instagram: Sat., May 8, noon  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Street Corner Arts: The Spin

    The Street Corner production of Spenser Davis' new modern drama, performed live for several shows night after night, is now available in recorded form online.
    Through May 15. $3.  
  • Arts

    Classical Music

    TEMP: Tales from the Decameron

    For its final video concert of the season, the Texas Early Music Project presents stories from an extremely timely source: The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio, a book of tales told by a group of young adults escaping the Black Death during the 1348 epidemic by sheltering in a villa just outside Florence. KMFA’s Sara Schneider provides a bit of historical background to The Decameron and the music of the period, then the action begins and we catch up with the intrepid group of plague-fleeing characters, accompanied with music composed by Gherardello da Firenze, Lorenzo da Firenze, Francesco Landini, and more.Still not convinced that this is a sonic wonderment perfectly suited to herald our exit from history's latest pandemic? Still thinking that this concert is something other than early-music glory so divinely embodied that it'll thrill anything you have that even resembles a soul? Doubt no more.Point one: The librettist is Wellesley College's Dr. Larry Rosenwald. Point two: These tales are narrated by Austin's own Marc Pouhé. Final point to, as they say, seal the deal: This preview trailer.Conclusion: Danny Johnson, you're a mensch.
    May 8-13. $5-50.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum: Curated Conversations

    This series explores and connects with the Blanton staff, streaming live every Tuesday at 5pm. The first installment featured Ellsworth Kelly's Austin; another week had curators discussing artworks that reinterpret, interrogate, and expand the narrative of national flags. The Blanton's collections are vast, as is the knowledge of these professionals. Click on over, we suggest, to enjoy a bit of both.
    Tuesdays, 5-6pm. Free.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Spring and All

    "Patrick Puckett's paintings are known for their bold colors and strong leisurely figures, executed with confident interaction between paint application, shape, color and texture." Like, the feeling you get when you've had your second vaccine, and you've suffered through that One Day of Bleh, and now, even though there's still a pandemic going on, you feel so much safer and ready to take on the world again, just as things are starting to reopen and spring is launching into its brightest phase of green beauty before summer comes a-blazing down our paths again? That feeling? This show – Puckett's work in general – captures that feeling. Welcome yourself back to Austin, we suggest, at the Workman Gallery sometime this month.
    Through May 29
All Events
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Art 84: Cornelius Carter

    This is a virtual preview of "Work in Progress" by Austin's Cornelius Carter, a work that "captures the struggles and glory of the African-American experience along with the artist’s faith in the American dream of equality and opportunity for all."
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Atelier Dojo: Remote Studios

    The local powerhouse of figurative painting, the art school that's the smart school for artists of all kinds, they've got a painting-along-at-home series going to help you keep your skills honed in these socially restrictive times, featuring live costumed models posing on camera and a thriving community of creatives rendering that lovely human biotecture from their separate studios. "Join us for a three-hour costumed-model drawing session. Use any supplies you wish, listen to music, share your work, chat with others. It’s a great way to stay connected with your art community!"
    Tuesdays, 1:30-4:30pm; Fridays, 6:30-9:30pm; Saturdays, 9:30-12:30pm. $5.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    Ballet Austin: Classes Online

    While you're home, wherever you are across the world,: you can still take a dance, fitness, or Pilates class with Ballet Austin. Ballet, barre, contemporary dance, hip-hop, tap, cardio dance fitness, and Pilates out the wazoo, so to speak, because there are so many varieties to choose among, and all taught by professional instructors – and it's all available 24/7, just like the internets.
    $3-7 per class.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    Blue Lapis Light: Beyond the Clouds

    The acclaimed aerial dance troupe's 2020 performance (chosen by Chronicle Arts Editor Robert Faires for inclusion among his Top Ten shows of the year) is now available in a digital version online – free of charge.
    Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Books

    BOOKS: Pick 'Em Up Curbside!

    Don’t forget, citizen: The best place to get your reading material is from Austin's own Malvern Books or HalfPrice Books or Black Pearl Books or Bookpeople or BookWoman stores. (And for the ultimate in vintage collectors' editions and unique works on paper, we recommend the excellent South Congress Books.)Or try Bookshop.org in general – because Bookshop, unlike the online behemoth named after a river, shares the profits among all its independent-bookstore members.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Camiba Art: Since Last We Met

    What do you get when you rescue a discarded Leclerc table loom from the curb during a neighborhood walk? If you're acclaimed ceramic artist Jen Rose, you use the knowledge you gained about weaving in college and you integrate that weaving into your porcelain practice. What do you get if you visit Rose's latest show of works, now on display at this fine gallery? An eyeful of sculptural creations, threaded multiples, that are hung, draped, twisted, and manipulated toward a pattern-rich kinesis. This show, tell you what, it's sublime.
    Through May 15
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity. Note: The exhibition will be online for a year.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Collective Voices

    Caroline Walker, a multidisciplinary artist who incorporates an augmented reality component into much of her work, brings together the voices of community members distanced due to COVID-19 through outdoor art installations at several local venues.
    Through May 13  
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Esther's Follies

    You don't have to slog your way through Dirty Sixth anymore, citizen – you can catch the arch antics and musical mayhem of the Esther's crew on video as they unleash fresh new sketches and songs and more about the hottest topics of the day. And there's all sorts of behind-the-scenes extras now, too, and it's all available via their Patreon page. You need to laugh right about now, so this is a good idea, right? And sports are important, sure they are, but wouldn't you rather be a local comedy supporter than a local athletic supporter? [*pauses for response, hears only crickets*] Right – leaving it to these professionals, then.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lora Reynolds Gallery: Twenty-Eight Skies

    Witness these large new works on paper by Jason Middlebrook, in the artist's fifth show at the gallery. "Much of this work can be imagined as bearing witness to a mortal struggle between man and nature," say the gallery notes, "a struggle between frenetic geometric patterns and the humble flora we too often overlook and take for granted."
    Through June 12
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    MACC Galleries: Reopened!

    The Community Gallery and the Sam Z. Coronado Gallery in the Mexican-American Cultural Center reopen "with social distancing and additional health and safety precautions in place," and inviting reservations to see "Rosy Campanita, El Camino del Corazon, The Path of the Heart," which documents 13 years of struggle, persistence, and resilience between 2003-2016, and "Poética Textil/ Textile Poems," in which contemporary artists reveal their restlessness, inquiry, and research into the creation of fabric art via printing, weaving, and assemblage.
    Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm. Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    MACC: 21/ Veintiuno

    The Mexican-American Cultural Center presents this new virtual exhibition by Ender Martos, featuring multiple digital photographs of the acclaimed artist’s work arranged in three thematic periods of 21 years that represent the artist’s past, present, and future.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Northern-Southern: TOOO

    Here's another experiment in new exhibition-making from gallery owner Phillip Niemeyer and his friends. This show does not close – it decays and renews. Listen: TO opened in February, a show of directions; in March, about half the work in TO had decayed; TOO added five new pieces, renewing the show; now, only one piece from TO remains: an audio remembrance by Alyssa Taylor Wendt. But TOOO renews the entire show like an agave phoenix, with 12 new pieces, including work by the founders of Partial Shade (who were conducting outdoor salons on the Co-Lab land in 2018) and Giampiero Selvaggio (one of the founders of Red Bud Park and the network of connecting bike trails around East Austin). There's provenance and pedigree and intentional lack of permanence, colliding here to unnerving effect.
    Ongoing
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    SAGE Studio: Spring Work

    Here's a two-person exhibition featuring the work of Dallas-based abstract painter Charlie French alongside the vibrant pastel drawings of Austin's own Emily Dodson. The work is "a visual representation of the season as well as the collective rebirth many are feeling as the weather warms and things begin to lighten."
    Through May 31
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Texas Folklife: The Brush Is A Bow

    Howard Rains is a watercolor artist and a master fiddler. Now, the abandonment of touring and the quiet hours in his studio during this pandemic have begun to shift his portraits of fellow musicians and others into the realm of the surreal. Like how? Like this.
    Ongoing online  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton: From the Collection of Jack Shear

    In 1999, the photographer and art collector Jack Shear co-organized an exhibition at New York’s Drawing Center: "Drawn from Artist’s Collections." This new show at the Blanton is curated by Shear "in an exploratory, free-flowing manner in which the forms, compositions and colors on the sheets respond to one another in a playful, non-traditional hang."
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Social Distancing Festival

    This is an online community, as playwright and unstoppable force of creative nature Nick Green informs us, and it's been activated to "celebrate and showcase the work of the many artists around the world who have been affected by the need for social distancing that has come about due to the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19)." It's not Austin-based, this virtual and ongoing festival of all kinds of performance arts, but damned if there aren't a few talented Austinites among the eclectic mix.
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Trainwreck Tuesdays: An Open Mic

    Yes, it's comedy night at the Common – presented by G-Spot Comedy Showcase, replete with drink specials, and followed by karaoke. You're, what, still waiting for the punchline? It's an open mic, laughmonger, you supply the punchline. Note: Sign up at 7pm.
    Tuesdays, 7:30-9:30pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Umlauf Sculpture Garden

    The Umlauf reopens its famed Garden to the general public. There won’t be any performances going on yet, as occasionally delighted crowds in the Before Times, but there will be all those expertly wrought sculptures, the bronze or stone cynosures from Charles Umlauf and others anchoring sight among the bright gardenscapes and tree-towered paths: Perfect for a strolling, fresh-air respite from yet another screenful of pixels in your all-too-familiar abode.: Note: The usual safety measures will be in effect: A limit of 30 visitors in the garden at a time; a one-way marked path to follow; masks and social distancing strongly encouraged; etc. (You know the routine: You’re an old hand at this pandemic shit by now, right?) Also, know that the Umlauf’s private-event rentals will resume with limited capacity set by local and state guidelines – and its summer camp program will proceed with those restrictions in mind, too.: See the museum’s website for details and to schedule an appointment.
    Tue.-Fri., 10am-4pm; Sat.-Sun., 11am-4pm
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Virtual Hideout: Improv Social Hour

    It's social – demented and virtual, but social. Join the Hideout crowd every weekday at 6pm for a Zoomed hour of improv games and antics where you'll learn a thing or two about comedy improvisation (their talented instructors will help you along) and your day will certainly be brightened. Yes, and maybe bring a friend with you? Cheers!
    Mon.-Fri., 6pm. $10.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Poster Show

    Now here's some gorgeous and affordable visuals for anybody's favorite wall: A new series of 20-by-16-inch posters celebrating the creations of Workman-repped artists – Malcolm Bucknall! Ashley Benton! Helmut Barnett! Ian Shults! Those amazing Scribners! And many more! – with funds going to support those artists. Give it a look-see on the website.

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