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for Sat., Dec. 12
  • Día de los Muertos Artisan Mercado & Art Exhibit

    Celebrate Día de los Muertos with art, live music and an Artisan Mercado! View the Día de los Muertos Exhibit, listen to a concert by Singer Songwriter Tish Hinojosa and shop for Latino handcrafted art and arts and crafts.
    Sat. Oct. 30, 1pm-5pm  
    La Peña
  • The Baron's Men Present A Midsummer Night's Dream by Wm. Shakespeare

    Join The Baron's Men for a night of frivolity, magic, and comedy as they present one of Shakespeare's most beloved (and most produced) works. The show opens October 1st and runs every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evening through October 23rd. Tickets and additional information available online. You don't want to miss this one!
    Oct. 1-Oct. 23  
    The Curtain Theatre
Recommended
  • Arts

    Classical Music

    Austin Classical Guitar: Nella Fantasia

    Join well-strung maestro Matt Hinsley and the ACG team for holiday gratitude and joy in music and story, as they reflect on the year behind us (and none too soon) and share hopes for the future.
    Sat., Dec. 12, 8pm. Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Bale Creek Allen Gallery: Promised Land

    Musician John Doe and visual artist Michael Mogavero have been friends for almost 50 years, witnessing and enjoying each other’s work as it progressed and evolved. Recently, Mogavero sent Doe a group of new images, some of which Doe paired with poems. During the process, titles were changed and unexpected stories were added within the images. This collaboration at Bale Creek Allen Gallery is a celebration of melding poetry with visual images and a testament to the artists' friendship, and our Robert Faires tells you more about it right here.
    Through Jan. 4
  • Arts

    Dance

    Ballet Austin: The Nutcracker

    Local luminaries enliven the stage with holiday splendor and wintery exuberance in this Nutcracker digital film, featuring Ballet Austin’s 2019 stage production by Stephen Mills, now streaming on-demand and including a plethora of bonus material, cast and crew interviews, and behind-the-scenes featurettes. Note: You can get access with a tax-deductible donation to Ballet Austin and view the kinetic wonderment until the new year dawns.
    Through Jan. 1  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Frank Wo/Men Collective: K ! :D D: Ö

    Texas Performing Arts and Fusebox Festival present that gang of kinetic provocateurs whose work “is underpinned with intersectional thinking, queerness, Freudian curiosities, body positivity, and absurdist exploration." Yes, it's the Frank Wo/Men Collective, bringing their latest (after 2019's brilliant Rub a Duck) to Austin via the internets, in a live-action, warped childhood-playscape experiment that engages the audience with a User Interface, allowing us to modify environments, play games with the characters, "and even taste control." Ah, is that what that flavor is? Yummmmmmmy!
    Dec. 12-13. Sat.-Sun., slots available at 2pm, 4pm, 6pm, and 8pm. Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Human Resources: The Musical

    Here's a team of theatre artists from across the country – a cast and crew of nearly 30, with the majority from Austin, but with others from Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, and more – presenting the premiere of a brand new musical. Yes, it’s online. And, yes, they’re doing it in quarantine. This musical is a satirical horror comedy that looks at the unsavory ways women are treated in the workplace, with book and lyrics by Mallory Schlossberg and music by Schlossberg and Alexandra Smith. Choreography and movement by Kelly Hasandras. Look: Our Robert Faires interviewed the playwright right here.
    Fri.-Sat., Dec. 11-12, 7pm. Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    Metamorphosis Dance: The Nutcracker

    The Metamorphosis Dance company presents this annual and unique telling of the beloved holiday classic – coming to you virtually this year, via video of the ballet's performance at the Carver Museum.
    Through Dec. 24. $10-50.  
  • Arts

    Books

    MexAmeriCon

    Austin’s first Latinx Comic Book Convention is back for its third year – as a virtual event showcasing Mexican-American and Latinx artists who create comic books, graphic novels, zines, and related media. Will there will be music, an artist alley, as well as interviews and panels exploring topics relating to comics and Latinx culture> You know it, citizen!
    Sat., Dec. 12, 11am-4pm. Free.  
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Moontower Comedy: Big Jay Oakerson

    Festival favorite Oakerson's the co-host of the Legion of Skanks and The SDR Show podcasts on Gas Digital Network, of course, and of The Bonfire with Big Jay Oakerson and Dan Soder on Comedy Central Radio. He's also the towering sequoia of comedy who'll be bringing the laughs onstage at that revered theatre Downtown this weekend. Bonus: Josh Adam Meyers opens.
    Fri.-Sat., Dec. 11-12, 7 & 10pm. $22-30.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Northern-Southern: Baton

    This is a group show by relay, begun in July of 2020 as a method of socially distancing a community in the height of the pandemic: Artists took turns alone in the space, each adding to the exhibition. Now, as it nears its close, the exhibition resembles a community in which work converses and overlaps. With Adreon Henry, Vy Ngo, Dawn Okoro, Leon Alesi, Matt Steinke, Sev Coursen, Stella Alesi, and more.
    Closing reception: Sat., July 24, 3-9pm
  • Arts

    Classical Music

    Sounds of the Season: Tinsel

    The festive and merry Tinsel Singers grace the magnificent porch of the Neill-Cochran House Museum to sing all your holiday favorites.
    Sun., Dec. 20, 2pm. $10.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Teatro Vivo: Cuento Navideño

    It's "Bah, Humbug!" in the barrio, as Teatro Vivo presents this festive family comedy that infuses Latino culture, Spanish language, and holiday traditions into one theatrical celebration. Written and directed by Rupert Reyes, streaming online as 2020 draws to a close.
    Through 20. Thu.-Sat., 7pm; Sun., 2pm. Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    The Watchmaker's Song: A Drive-In Nutcracker Experience.

    This year, the audience will follow the Watchmaker and his loved ones through an entirely new narrative, as conceived by Ventana Ballet's new co-artistic director, Jerreme Rodriguez, in an effort to make the most of this nontraditional venue. "The new adaptation honors the elements of The Watchmaker’s Song that set it apart from traditional stagings of The Nutcracker Ballet," they tell us, and it's enlivened by Duke Ellington’s jazzy rendition of the original Tchaikovsky music.
    Through Dec. 19. Fri.-Sat., 6:30 & 8pm. $25 per person.  
    2400 E. Cesar Chavez
  • Arts

    Theatre

    ZACH's Rockin' Holiday Concert: CANCELED

    Thanks, 'ronas, you stupid, confounding pathogens.: We're at Stage 5, people. Stay safe, stay home, and stream something.
    Through Jan. 3. Thu.-Fri., 7:30pm; Sat.-Sun., 2:30 & 7:30pm
All Events
  • Arts

    Books

    2021 Texas Poetry Calendar Reading

    Join the celebration via Zoom and welcome a whole new year's document as poets from across Texas read about the diverse culture, iconography, and geography of our home state
    Sat., Dec. 12, 7pm. Free, but you could buy a calendar, too.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    AO5 Gallery: Disruption

    Hey, you! Globally aware art connoisseur! Don't miss this show of bold visuals from some of the most famous European street artists – like Banksy, Striker, Zero, and Cee Pil – now sharing wall space with works by Austin's own Jason Eatherly, Dave Lowell, and that Impossible Winterbourne.
    Through Dec. 31
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Armadillo World Headquarters 50th Anniversary Exhibition

    AusPop presents a celebration of the legendary Armadillo World Headquarters, offering an impressive array of posters, photos, and newspaper clippings with which to immerse yourself in the venue's well-documented history. (No one may know exactly where we're going, these days, but this is – vividly – where we've been.) You can schedule a time in advance to visit the gallery (any Saturday or Sunday) and you've gotta wear a mask, citizen, because this long strange trip is something we're still in the confounding middle of, y'dig?
    Through Dec. 13
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Art 84: Cornelius Carter

    This is a virtual preview of "Work in Progress" by Austin's Cornelius Carter, a work that "captures the struggles and glory of the African-American experience along with the artist’s faith in the American dream of equality and opportunity for all."
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Art for the People: Where the Bots Begin

    Lauren Briére’s art escorts the viewer on a visual journey into outer space, the fun of sports, walks in nature, and various adventures and shenanigans, as Art for the People showcases 200-plus sketches that are the artist's penciled beginnings to creating her whimsical "Robots in Rowboats."
    Through Jan. 3
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Atelier Dojo: Holiday Auction

    Austin's premiere realist artists' teaching collective is holding an online auction of figurative works – a fine array of paintings and drawings – as created by the dojo's faculty and advanced students. You want some original images of human faces and bodies on your walls, classing up where you've been sheltering at home, improving the view for guests when we can all visit each other again? Here's an excellent opportunity to get some!
    Through Dec. 12  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Atelier Dojo: Remote Studios

    The local powerhouse of figurative painting, the art school that's the smart school for artists of all kinds, they've got a painting-along-at-home series going to help you keep your skills honed in these socially restrictive times, featuring live costumed models posing on camera and a thriving community of creatives rendering that lovely human biotecture from their separate studios. "Join us for a three-hour costumed-model drawing session. Use any supplies you wish, listen to music, share your work, chat with others. It’s a great way to stay connected with your art community!"
    Tuesdays, 1:30-4:30pm; Fridays, 6:30-9:30pm; Saturdays, 9:30-12:30pm. $5.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    Ballet Austin: Classes Online

    While you're home, wherever you are across the world,: you can still take a dance, fitness, or Pilates class with Ballet Austin. Ballet, barre, contemporary dance, hip-hop, tap, cardio dance fitness, and Pilates out the wazoo, so to speak, because there are so many varieties to choose among, and all taught by professional instructors – and it's all available 24/7, just like the internets.
    $3-7 per class.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    Ballet Austin: Nutcracker Gift Barre

    This year – this relentlessly crazy-ass year – Ballet Austin brings their Nutcracker Gift Barre online to offer a great selection of holiday gifts, including nutcrackers, ornaments, tiaras, and T-shirts – with curbside pickup, delivery, or beyond-Austin shipping available. Note: 100% of proceeds will benefit Ballet Austin.
    Through Dec. 18  
  • Arts

    Books

    Books, Books, Books in the ATX

    Don’t forget, citizen: The best place to get your reading material is from Austin's own Malvern Books or HalfPrice Books or Black Pearl Books or Bookpeople or BookWoman stores – in-person or online. (And for the ultimate in vintage collectors' editions and unique works on paper, we recommend the excellent South Congress Books.)Or try Bookshop.org in general – because Bookshop, unlike the online behemoth named after a river, shares the profits among all its independent-bookstore members.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Camiba Art: Perspectives on 2020

    If anyone can make sense out of this dumpster fire of a year, it's probably the artists of Camiba. Valerie Fowler, Edward Lane McCartney, Kate Bradshaw, Lee Albert Hill, Orna Feinstein, Adreon Henry, Zoe Schulman, and more – these bright talents will provide much food for thought and images to conjure with as we slide into what we can only hope isn't the out-of-the-frying-pan-and-into-the-fire situation of 2021.
    Through Dec. 26  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Cloud Tree Studio: Cusp

    This is a new solo show by Court Lurie, weaving together the artist's large contemporary abstract paintings, poetry, photography, drawings, and installation. New works are curated with older pieces, and poetry written decades ago intermingles with an interactive installation in a robust yet tender homage to the experience of liminality. (And as 2020 begins its palsied lurch into 2021, yeah, this is one hell of an experience of liminality.)
    Through Dec. 20  
  • Arts

    Comedy

    ColdTowne TV

    "Set your dial to CTTV for at-home entertainment seven nights a week on ColdTowne’s Twitch channel, featuring experimental improv, live podcasts, scripted readings, guest characters, and more. Whether you’re a front row sitter or like to chill in the back, you can join the conversation with our interactive chat or just kick back and relax as you recline into cyberspace." See website for details.
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Dave Chappelle & Friends

    Yes, Dave Chappelle. Live, at Stubb's. And, for a few of the shows, Austin's Joe Rogan will be among the titular friends joining him onstage.
    Dec. 11-13. Fri.-Sat., 7pm; Sun., 6pm  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Davis Gallery: Together Apart

    This is an extensive group exhibit focused on the experience of sharing holidays apart from loved ones, with artists addressing the importance of family, life and death, our connection to nature, and spirituality. Each of the artists has created new work (or chosen work from the past) that uniquely recognizes these concepts. And this is the Davis Gallery, so those artists include Chun Hui Pak, David Everett, Faustinus Deraet, David Leonard, Dana Younger, Fallon Bartos, and others, and we're giving it our highest recommendation.
    Through Jan. 16
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Flatbed Press: 2020 Hindsight

    Here's a fine way to sum a year in the printerly life: Flatbed presents a new exhibition of works from each of the 14 artists who worked at the press this year – along with the “Every Head Is a World, Every World Is a Head” portfolio of prints by Michael Ray Charles that was published shortly before Flatbed relocated in 2019. Featuring art by Melissa Miller, Adrian Armstrong, Suzi Davidoff, Lance Letscher, David Everett, Darden Smith, and more.
    Through Jan. 9. Wed.-Fri., 10am-5pm, and by appointment
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Forklift Danceworks: Portraits at Downs Field

    It's the culminating piece of Forklift's year-long residency at Downs Field in East Austin: Portraits of the Downs Field community by photographer Cindy Elizabeth, installed at the field for everyone to see. The project explores the importance of Downs Field to the continual flourishing of baseball in Texas, through the past, present, and future.
    Through Jan. 4
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Georgetown Art Center: Book Passage

    Yeah, sometimes we just can't help but pimp – er, we mean promote – this arty bastion that's so up north it makes us think twice as we glance at our long-suffering Isuzu. But, listen, this is a show of reclaimed books that have been altered in extraordinary ways by Janice Anderson and John Sager – via collage, via paint, via outright sculpting of the materials. Anderson is new to us, but we saw a few of Sager's bibliophilic alterations over a decade ago and we're still talking about their beauty even now. Recommended, and definitely worth the trip. (Bonus: Check out the excellent Lark & Owl bookstore while you're there, too.)
    Through Jan. 3
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    grayDUCK Gallery: Crit Group Show

    The Contemporary Austin's 2020 Crit Group show features work by Annie Arnold, Rakhee Jain Desai, Lydia Garcia, Sean Ripple, Alexandra Robinson, Saul Jerome E. San Juan, Michael Stephen, and Cheyenne Weaver.
    Through Dec.13
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    House of Mesmerize: Enter the Multiverse

    This interactive, gallery-style experience inside Austin's Native Hostel "follows the journey of Mesmer, an artist and amateur tinkerer who discovers a secret: we and our universe are not alone. Mesmer opens up a portal and is swallowed into the Multiverse and its infinite cosmic curiosities." The created environment features 15 unique art installations, with multiple paths and possibilities, and you know there'll be safety protocols to follow, too, to thwart those pesky 'ronas. ⁠Note: We'll be looking into this and getting back to you with a full report.
    Through Dec. 20. Thu.-Sun., 11am-11pm. $25.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ICOSA: Transmissions

    Here's a new exhibition at that Canopy-situated space we love to visit. For "Transmissions," Terra Goolsby and Tammie Rubin have curated a pandemic-inspired show that answers, via a diversity of methods, questions like, "What's performance without the expectations of the traditional shared experiences? How to create intimacy and connection mediated through limited audiences, through projected and virtual transmissions?" And the respondents? Urethra Burns, Veronica Ceci, Antonio Cueto, Chloe Curiel, Michael Anthony García, Jay Roff-Garcia, Ryan Hollaway, Delilah Rose Knuckley, Yuliya Lanina, Brendan Lay, Andrea Muñoz Martinez, Pamela Martinez, Gesel Mason Performance Projects, Teresa Moralez, Jessamyn Leigh Plotts, Alexandra Robinson, LaRissa Rogers, Ivy Roots, and St Celfer. And, listen: The performances are a mix of ICOSA by-appointment time at the venue, Zoom livestreaming and pre-recorded works, ICOSA window performances, and limited-contact open exhibition hours; see the website for times, links, reservations, and more. Recommended: Catch all of the action, or just catch some of it, but don't miss this vivid exploration of WTF-does-performance-mean-in-these-constrained-times?
    Through Jan. 3. Gallery hours: Fri.-Sat., noon-6pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Ivester Contemporary: Absolute Relativism

    This is a solo exhibition by Austin-based artist Dave McClinton, representing a continuation of his Black Life series, an ongoing project that aims to illustrate the inner life-cycle of Black people in America. "McClinton’s single edition digital collages focus on the bodies and portraits of Black people embellished with textures of foundational elements, symbols related to trade and status, as well as text from historical documents derived directly from America’s long and lingering history of slavery and white supremacism." Also, this work? Bold, illuminating, confrontational, and aesthetically superlative. Bonus: Ivester's Project Space presents "Olas de Perturbación," new works by Michael Anthony Garcia.
    Through Jan. 9
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Joe/Kamala Yard Art on Bellvue

    There, across 14 front yards on Bellvue Avenue: A sign of hope! Signs of hope, actually – the pro-Biden/Harris (or, as the artist puts it, Joe/Kamala) artworks of Austin's David Hefner. It's an excellent opportunity for a lift-up-your-spirits drive-by or walking tour: good stuff, visually, even beyond its message. Also a good excuse – go ahead, do it – to check out that Hefner's website, peruse some of the other works he's done.
    Mayyyybe through Inauguration Day?
    Bellvue Avenue, between 42nd & 45th, two blocks west of Lamar
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Laguna Gloria

    This local treasure of a venue, run by those Contemporary Austin folks who also bring us the Jones Center shows Downtown, is all about the outdoors – which is perfect for these trickily navigated times of ours, n'est-ce pas? Recommended: Stop by and breathe in the air, enjoy the lawns and gardens and the many examples of world-class sculpture arrayed across the property, and (as Frankie used to say) r-e-l-a-x.
    Thu.-Fri., 9am-noon; Sat.-Sun., 9am-3pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Link & Pin: Destroy Something Beautiful

    Borrowing a metaphor from Fight Club (when Tyler Durden disfigures Angel Face, remember?), this show picks up where the artist’s labored perfection ends and his unbound "self-important vandalism" begins. Yeah? Listen: This is the work of Chad Rea, former advertising copywriter, whose creations are vivid and clever and nigh on unforgettable, whose succinct-as-fuck visual takes on our modern times will kick your eyes' ass in a pleasurable fashion.
    Through Dec. 13. Fri.-Sat., 1-5pm; Sun., 2-5pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lora Reynolds Gallery: Upwelling

    Meghann Riepenhoff makes her images with an antiquated photographic printing process – no camera, no lens – and thinks of her work as a collaboration with the ocean, the landscape, and precipitation, her dynamic cyanotypes taking on varying shades of blue to give the impression of water in motion, and much of her work is large enough to feel immersive, almost overwhelming.
    Through Jan. 16
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Martha's Contemporary: Feral

    Payton McGowen's first solo exhibition with the gallery features nine new acrylic on canvas paintings that explore the idea of returning to nature.
    Through Dec. 20
    4115 Guadalupe
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Prizer Arts & Letters: People the We

    This is a collaborative exhibition by Adrian Aguilera and Betelhem Makonnen, conceived in the wake and continuing aftermath of the Black Lives Matter uprisings that were reignited in May 2020. "Over a series of masked and socially distanced exchanges, mostly in the natural spaces outside both their studios, Aguilera and Makonnen tried to give form to the overwhelming personal and collective emotions of rage, disappointment, exhaustion, and bruised hope that they experienced in the last six months. Cultivating their continuous curiosity about the relationship between symbols and collective identity, transnationality and diaspora perspectives, as well as history's inextricable hold on the present, Aguilera and Makonnen introduce new multimedia work in conversation with existing work to reflect on this (re)current moment in our country." Recommended: Make an appointment for viewing; check out the gallery's front window for a preview.
    Through Jan. 3
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Stephen L. Clark Gallery: Lance Letscher

    An exhibition of new collage works by Austin's own Lance Letscher might be just the thing we need to ground us in these tumultuous times. Or, contrarily, to lift us above the unnerving political fray. That whole thing about art "comforting the afflicted," right? Many of us are trending rather afflicted of late, and the artist's painstaking paper creations will, we insist, mitigate that visually, through graphic reinvention of previous forms, offering a reassuring sense of patterns and meaning to our eyes.
    Through Dec. 26. Tue.-Sat., 11am-4pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Sterling Allen: Photorealism

    Northern-Southern presents an outdoor exhibit of work by Sterling Allen, the entire show arrayed across the exterior grounds of an easily missed, unleased building on West Anderson Lane. Constructed both in his studio and on site, each artwork exists in conjunction with the surrounding environment, slipping between obvious and invisible. Subscribers will be emailed links to a map to the site and information about the works, and they can explore the enhanced grounds themselves.
    Through Dec. 19  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    SUFFRAGE NOW: A 19th Amendment Centennial Exhibition

    On August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote. On August 6, 2020, the Elisabet Ney Museum debuted this new show for which women photographers nationwide were invited to share photos that comment on the Centennial of the Ratification of the 19th Amendment. The most eloquent images were chosen and are included in this online exhibition.
    Through Jan. 31. Free.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum of Art: Expanding Abstraction

    In the early 20th century, Western artists began exploring abstract, nonrepresentational forms for the first time. Several decades later, abstraction's practitioners experimented with new materials and techniques: Dripping, pouring, staining, and even slinging paint became common, as did the use of non-traditional media such as acrylic and industrial paints. Artists also ditched the flat, rectangular format to create sculptural texture and dimensionality. Now, can you guess whose corporate collection is particularly strong in such paintings of the 1960s and '70s? If you guessed "The Blanton Museum of Art," then you'll especially want to get an eyeful of this major new show, subtitled "Pushing the Boundaries of Painting in the Americas," organized by the venue's own Carter E. Foster.
    Through Jan. 10  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Social Distancing Festival

    This is an online community, as playwright and unstoppable force of creative nature Nick Green informs us, and it's been activated to "celebrate and showcase the work of the many artists around the world who have been affected by the need for social distancing that has come about due to the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19)." It's not Austin-based, this virtual and ongoing festival of all kinds of performance arts, but damned if there aren't a few talented Austinites among the eclectic mix.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Umlauf Sculpture Garden

    The Umlauf reopens its famed Garden to the general public. There won’t be any performances going on yet, as occasionally delighted crowds in the Before Times, but there will be all those expertly wrought sculptures, the bronze or stone cynosures from Charles Umlauf and others anchoring sight among the bright gardenscapes and tree-towered paths: Perfect for a strolling, fresh-air respite from yet another screenful of pixels in your all-too-familiar abode.: Note: The usual safety measures will be in effect: A limit of 30 visitors in the garden at a time; a one-way marked path to follow; masks and social distancing strongly encouraged; etc. (You know the routine: You’re an old hand at this pandemic shit by now, right?) Also, know that the Umlauf’s private-event rentals will resume with limited capacity set by local and state guidelines – and its summer camp program will proceed with those restrictions in mind, too.: See the museum’s website for details and to schedule an appointment.
    Tue.-Fri., 10am-4pm; Sat.-Sun., 11am-4pm
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Virtual Hideout

    So many shows, so many themes, such a freakin' panoply of improv talents at this Hideout that it makes the mind, how you say, boggle. Longtime house troupe Parallelogramophonograph sets the performance bar high AF, but damned if their everchanging roster of guests doesn't sometimes knock it right off. (The Hideout's got a full weekly schedule of entertainments for you online, of course, courtesy of relentless creativity even in the face of those stupid, stupid 'ronas.) Check that website, STAT.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: As Above, So Below

    Here's a two-person show, with California-based Julia Lucey and Colorado's Julie Maren. Both artists take inspiration from nature, Maren working directly with natural materials like burr acorn shells and mica to create organically shaped wall installations, Lucey creating meticulous etching collages that depict local flora and fauna.
    Through Dec. 30
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Women & Their Work: Brianna McIntyre

    "My goal at Women & Their Work," says Brianna McIntyre, "is to experiment with textile waste as a viable, usable, buildable material." Using a previous bent lamination shelf design as a template, she'll create structured forms that show the visual continuity and material evolution of the design.
    Through Dec. 12
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wyld Gallery

    This is Ray Donley's gallery of art by Native Americans, located Downtown and resplendent with creations from the original people of our struggling country.
    Call for appointment
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Yard Dog: Commit to Something Drastic

    That Welsh rabble-rouser, painter extraordinaire, and punk rock pioneer Jon Langford sinks his teeth into the world with new paintings and prints. See what grisly graphic brilliance he's bitten off – via the Yard Dog website or by making an appointment for an in-person visit.
    Through Dec. 30. Free.  

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