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for Mon., Nov. 30
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  • Arts

    Classical Music

    Austin Opera: Lauren + Mark Digital Concert Event

    Now, music lovers, now you can watch the opening production of Austin Opera's re-imagined 2020-2021 season – the Lauren Snouffer + Mark Diamond Digital Concert Event – as a limited-edition online release. And you know Nyle Matsuoka provides the piano for this wonderment, right?
    Through Nov. 30. Free.  
  • Arts

    Books

    The Stars at Night: Constellations

    Each fall, the editors and staff of American Short Fiction host a grand celebration that recognizes literary excellence, extraordinary literary service, great teaching and mentorship, and a debut writer from Texas. ASF’s fifth annual showcase goes virtual this year on November 30, 2020, with a stellar program line-up of acclaimed authors and community leaders in conversation about how we can stay connected in this time of distance through a shared love of literature. Featuring Jamaica Kincaid, C Pam Zhang, Charlotte Gullick, Selena Anderson, and more.
    Mon., Nov. 30, 7pm. $50.  
All Events
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    AO5 Gallery: Disruption

    Hey, you! Globally aware art connoisseur! Don't miss this show of bold visuals from some of the most famous European street artists – like Banksy, Striker, Zero, and Cee Pil – now sharing wall space with works by Austin's own Jason Eatherly, Dave Lowell, and that Impossible Winterbourne.
    Through Dec. 31
  • Arts

    Dance

    Ballet Austin: Nutcracker Gift Barre

    This year – this relentlessly crazy-ass year – Ballet Austin brings their Nutcracker Gift Barre online to offer a great selection of holiday gifts, including nutcrackers, ornaments, tiaras, and T-shirts – with curbside pickup, delivery, or beyond-Austin shipping available. Note: 100% of proceeds will benefit Ballet Austin.
    Through Dec. 18  
  • Arts

    Books

    Books, Books, Books in ATX

    Don’t forget, citizen: The best place to get your reading material is from Austin’s own Malvern Books or Half Price Books or Black Pearl Books or BookPeople or BookWoman or Reverie Books stores – in person or online. (And for the ultimate in vintage collectors’ editions and unique works on paper, we recommend the excellent South Congress Books.)Or try Bookshop.org in general – because Bookshop, unlike the online behemoth named after a river, shares the profits among all its independent-bookstore members.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Dimension Gallery: Burden of Respectability

    Dimension Gallery's front window features the final installment of part one in their Rising Action series, with new works by Dawn Okoro. Incorporating elements of punk and Nigerian fashion, Okoro’s exhibition personifies the weight placed on Black individuals through the subversive nature of respectability politics – illustrated here by paintings, videos, garments, and jewelry that are informed by punk and compositional techniques used in fashion marketing.
    Through Dec. 5
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Forklift Danceworks: Portraits at Downs Field

    It's the culminating piece of Forklift's year-long residency at Downs Field in East Austin: Portraits of the Downs Field community by photographer Cindy Elizabeth, installed at the field for everyone to see. The project explores the importance of Downs Field to the continual flourishing of baseball in Texas, through the past, present, and future.
    Through Jan. 4
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Joe/Kamala Yard Art on Bellvue

    There, across 14 front yards on Bellvue Avenue: A sign of hope! Signs of hope, actually – the pro-Biden/Harris (or, as the artist puts it, Joe/Kamala) artworks of Austin's David Hefner. It's an excellent opportunity for a lift-up-your-spirits drive-by or walking tour: good stuff, visually, even beyond its message. Also a good excuse – go ahead, do it – to check out that Hefner's website, peruse some of the other works he's done.
    Mayyyybe through Inauguration Day?
    Bellvue Avenue, between 42nd & 45th, two blocks west of Lamar
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lora Reynolds Gallery: Upwelling

    Meghann Riepenhoff makes her images with an antiquated photographic printing process – no camera, no lens – and thinks of her work as a collaboration with the ocean, the landscape, and precipitation, her dynamic cyanotypes taking on varying shades of blue to give the impression of water in motion, and much of her work is large enough to feel immersive, almost overwhelming.
    Through Jan. 16
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Prizer Arts & Letters: People the We

    This is a collaborative exhibition by Adrian Aguilera and Betelhem Makonnen, conceived in the wake and continuing aftermath of the Black Lives Matter uprisings that were reignited in May 2020. "Over a series of masked and socially distanced exchanges, mostly in the natural spaces outside both their studios, Aguilera and Makonnen tried to give form to the overwhelming personal and collective emotions of rage, disappointment, exhaustion, and bruised hope that they experienced in the last six months. Cultivating their continuous curiosity about the relationship between symbols and collective identity, transnationality and diaspora perspectives, as well as history's inextricable hold on the present, Aguilera and Makonnen introduce new multimedia work in conversation with existing work to reflect on this (re)current moment in our country." Recommended: Make an appointment for viewing; check out the gallery's front window for a preview.
    Through Jan. 3
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    SUFFRAGE NOW: A 19th Amendment Centennial Exhibition

    On August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote. On August 6, 2020, the Elisabet Ney Museum debuted this new show for which women photographers nationwide were invited to share photos that comment on the Centennial of the Ratification of the 19th Amendment. The most eloquent images were chosen and are included in this online exhibition.
    Through Jan. 31. Free.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum of Art: Expanding Abstraction

    In the early 20th century, Western artists began exploring abstract, nonrepresentational forms for the first time. Several decades later, abstraction's practitioners experimented with new materials and techniques: Dripping, pouring, staining, and even slinging paint became common, as did the use of non-traditional media such as acrylic and industrial paints. Artists also ditched the flat, rectangular format to create sculptural texture and dimensionality. Now, can you guess whose corporate collection is particularly strong in such paintings of the 1960s and '70s? If you guessed "The Blanton Museum of Art," then you'll especially want to get an eyeful of this major new show, subtitled "Pushing the Boundaries of Painting in the Americas," organized by the venue's own Carter E. Foster.
    Through Jan. 10  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Yard Dog: Commit to Something Drastic

    That Welsh rabble-rouser, painter extraordinaire, and punk rock pioneer Jon Langford sinks his teeth into the world with new paintings and prints. See what grisly graphic brilliance he's bitten off – via the Yard Dog website or by making an appointment for an in-person visit.
    Through Dec. 30. Free.  

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