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for Wed., Sept. 30
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  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    A05 Gallery

    This popular gallery represents a wide array of artists, both local and international, with creations that span a dazzling plethora of mediums. Cynda Valle. Rachel Dory. John Morse. And – oh, give that website a quick look and you'll be making an appointment ASAP.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Art 84: Cornelius Carter

    This is a virtual preview of "Work in Progress" by Austin's Cornelius Carter, a work that "captures the struggles and glory of the African-American experience along with the artist’s faith in the American dream of equality and opportunity for all."
  • Arts

    Dance

    Ballet Austin: Classes Online

    While you're home, wherever you are across the world,: you can still take a dance, fitness, or Pilates class with Ballet Austin. Ballet, barre, contemporary dance, hip-hop, tap, cardio dance fitness, and Pilates out the wazoo, so to speak, because there are so many varieties to choose among, and all taught by professional instructors – and it's all available 24/7, just like the internets.
    $3-7 per class.  
  • Arts

    Books

    BOOKS: Pick 'Em Up Curbside!

    Don’t forget, citizen: The best place to get your reading material is from Austin's own Malvern Books or HalfPrice Books or Black Pearl Books or Bookpeople or BookWoman stores. (And for the ultimate in vintage collectors' editions and unique works on paper, we recommend the excellent South Congress Books.)Or try Bookshop.org in general – because Bookshop, unlike the online behemoth named after a river, shares the profits among all its independent-bookstore members.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Bullock Texas State History Museum: This Light of Ours

    This show features images by activist photographers of the Civil Rights Movement, telling a visual story of the struggle against segregation, race-based disenfranchisement, and Jim Crow laws in the 1960s. These photos capture the day-to-day struggles of everyday citizens and their resolve in the face of violence and institutionalized discrimination – with more than a dozen additional images representing activism and protest in Austin's own history.
    Tuesdays-Sundays. Through Dec. 6
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Camiba Art: Daydreams

    Dallas-based artist Charlotte Smith continues to explore the physical boundaries of paint as an artistic medium, rendering her pigmentations' progress as something wholly fresh and enticing, and the walls of Camiba are vibrant with these new works.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity.
  • Arts

    Comedy

    ColdTowne TV

    "Set your dial to CTTV for at-home entertainment seven nights a week on ColdTowne’s Twitch channel, featuring experimental improv, live podcasts, scripted readings, guest characters, and more. Whether you’re a front row sitter or like to chill in the back, you can join the conversation with our interactive chat or just kick back and relax as you recline into cyberspace." And, this just in: In-person improv and sketch classes have returned! See website for details.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Davis Gallery: Full Circle

    This retrospective exhibition, "Full Circle: 40 Years of Making Art," reveals four decades of Caprice Pierucci's prolific career as a visual artist. Beginning in the 1980s with handmade paper impaled on wooden spikes, Pierucci's fascination with the colors of the cotton papers, jute, and pine she worked with launched her into a 40-year practice that's resulted in the sophisticated handcarved wooden forms for which she's become so well known.
    Through Oct. 17
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Flatbed Press: Smoke Signals and other Reliable Means of Communication

    This is an exhibition of paintings, drawings, and woodcut prints by Richard Armendariz, showcasing images with cultural, biographical, and historical references carved and burned into their surfaces. "The work's content, found in classic novels, poems, and song lyrics, elevates and reinforces the conceptual link between the nuanced meanings of words and imagery." Note: There will be a small-group reception with the artist on Sat., Oct. 3, noon-5pm (reserve a spot via the Flatbed website), and a Zoomed reception later that evening.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Gender Unbound

    Throughout September, Gender Unbound is hosting a virtual showcase of newly commissioned work by trans and intersex artists and weekly livestreams of trans and intersex musicians, poets, storytellers, and artist interviews. (The Chronicle's Lilli Hime reports on it here.)
    Through Sept. 30  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Ivester Contemporary: Maiden Voyage

    This new venue in the Canopy complex isn't a pop-up shop showcasing somebody's craft-forward Etsy creations IRL – not that there's anything wrong with that – but a legit, this-is-what's-being-professionally-created-right-here-and-now art gallery. "Ivester Contemporary represents emerging and mid-career artists living and working in Austin and Central Texas. Our 1,600-square-foot site includes three exhibition spaces," one of which is for performances, time-based media, and installations. This inaugural exhibition features 18 (we daresay excellent) artists from Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, and Houston.
    Through Oct. 17. By appointment only.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lora Reynolds Gallery: County Road

    This exhibition of new photographs by Bryan Schutmaat is the artist's first presentation at LRG. The Houston native, now Austinite, began making his newest group of black-and-white pictures in the spring of 2020 ("just as pandemic fatigue was beginning to set in") while driving deserted back roads between Austin and Leon County, where his family has a farm. The gallery notes say: "Schutmaat's new body of work calls to mind Emily St. John Mandel's 2014 novel, Station Eleven, set 20 years after a virus wipes out 99% of the human population." (Sure – or perhaps it calls to mind one of these post-apocalyptic tales?) But this is some fine camera-work on display, and we recommend it highly.
    Through Nov. 7
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    MACC Galleries: Reopened!

    The Community Gallery and the Sam Z. Coronado Gallery in the Mexican-American Cultural Center reopen "with social distancing and additional health and safety precautions in place," and inviting reservations to see "Rosy Campanita, El Camino del Corazon, The Path of the Heart," which documents 13 years of struggle, persistence, and resilience between 2003-2016, and "Poética Textil/ Textile Poems," in which contemporary artists reveal their restlessness, inquiry, and research into the creation of fabric art via printing, weaving, and assemblage.
    Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm. Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Martha's Contemporary: Still Here

    Say, here's the inaugural show at Martha's new Guadalupe location – a powerful group exhibition featuring paintings, sculptures, and textiles by Jenaro Goode, Payton McGowen, Adrian Armstrong, Christina Ballentyne, Siena Smith, Alfonzo Gonzales Jr, Erick Medel, Sam Keller, and Alex Nguyen.
    Through Nov. 2. Tue.-Thu., noon-7pm; Fri.-Sat., noon-9pm
    4115 Guadalupe
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Mexic-Arte Museum

    Day of the Dead In observance of the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos, Mexic-Arte Museum presents the 37th annual Day of the Dead exhibition, paying tribute to the tradition that celebrates the return of the dead, featuring community altars and a special showing of artwork from the Juan Antonio Sandoval Jr. Collection. ELA 25: Intersection: Shock & Relief This annual show, formally known as Young Latinx Artists, celebrates the last 25 years of exhibitions, featuring the work of emerging Latinx artists as curated by Dr. George Vargas and revealing two new murals on the museum’s exterior Fifth Street wall.
    Through Nov. 22
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Prizer Arts & Letters: Rejina Thomas

    This new exhibition of paintings by Austin artist and community advocate Rejina Thomas "radiates energy, holding both the past and the present within the container of their frames, blurring the line between then and now." Note: In addition to viewing-by-appointment, the Prizer's front room will be lit from 8pm-midnight each night to allow viewings from outside the gallery and the artist will be live-painting on site.
    Through Sept. 30
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    SAGE Studio: Home Makers

    SAGE Studio, dedicated to connecting contemporary artists with disabilities to Texas’ broader arts community, presents its first virtual exhibition featuring work from 18 artists with intellectual and developmental disabilities from across the world. The art for this show was created at home during quarantine, when so many artists had to quickly shift their practices, alongside home-themed pieces that were made prior to the pandemic. Note: Works are available for viewing (and buying) online.
    Through Oct. 31
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    SUFFRAGE NOW: A 19th Amendment Centennial Exhibition

    On August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote. On August 6, 2020, the Elisabet Ney Museum debuted this new show for which women photographers nationwide were invited to share photos that comment on the Centennial of the Ratification of the 19th Amendment. The most eloquent images were chosen and are included in this online exhibition.
    Through Jan. 31. Free.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Social Distancing Festival

    This is an online community, as playwright and unstoppable force of creative nature Nick Green informs us, and it's been activated to "celebrate and showcase the work of the many artists around the world who have been affected by the need for social distancing that has come about due to the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19)." It's not Austin-based, this virtual and ongoing festival of all kinds of performance arts, but damned if there aren't a few talented Austinites among the eclectic mix.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Umlauf Sculpture Garden

    The Umlauf reopens its famed Garden to the general public. There won’t be any performances going on yet, as occasionally delighted crowds in the Before Times, but there will be all those expertly wrought sculptures, the bronze or stone cynosures from Charles Umlauf and others anchoring sight among the bright gardenscapes and tree-towered paths: Perfect for a strolling, fresh-air respite from yet another screenful of pixels in your all-too-familiar abode.: Note: The usual safety measures will be in effect: A limit of 30 visitors in the garden at a time; a one-way marked path to follow; masks and social distancing strongly encouraged; etc. (You know the routine: You’re an old hand at this pandemic shit by now, right?) Also, know that the Umlauf’s private-event rentals will resume with limited capacity set by local and state guidelines – and its summer camp program will proceed with those restrictions in mind, too.: See the museum’s website for details and to schedule an appointment.
    Tue.-Fri., 10am-4pm; Sat.-Sun., 11am-4pm
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Virtual Hideout

    So many shows, so many themes, such a freakin' panoply of improv talents at this Hideout that it makes the mind, how you say, boggle. Longtime house troupe Parallelogramophonograph sets the performance bar high AF, but damned if their everchanging roster of guests doesn't sometimes knock it right off. The Hideout's got a full weekly schedule of entertainments for you online, and – yes! – in-person improv classes have returned! Check that website, STAT.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Carol Dawson

    Any birder with a "life list" – they'll want to see this show. Anybody who likes 1) birds or 2) brilliantly wielded watercolors or, especially, 3) both – they'll want to see this show, too. If you don't see it in person, OK, you're sheltering in place and decreasing the potential spread of this damned coronavirus, so thank you. But if you don't at least see it online, then I … I don't know what to tell you anymore, citizen. Because Dawson's work is, in its accuracy and composition, responding to the 18th and 19th century traditions of natural science illustration, it's as astonishingly beautiful as the creatures she depicts.
    Through Oct. 4
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Poster Show

    Now here's some gorgeous and affordable visuals for anybody's favorite wall: A new series of 20-by-16-inch posters celebrating the creations of Workman-repped artists – Malcolm Bucknall! Ashley Benton! Helmut Barnett! Ian Shults! Those amazing Scribners! And many more! – with funds going to support those artists. Give it a look-see on the website.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Women & Their Work: Likes Charge

    The newest exhibition by that remarkable digital savant Melanie Clemmons transforms the gallery into a livestream temple dedicated to reimagining networked technology as a medium for spiritual rejuvenation and metaphysical manifestation. Why, your Austin Chronicle's Brenner reviewed the show right here.
    Through Oct. 8
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Yard Dog: Bill Miller

    Here's the renowned artist's latest work, assembled from salvaged linoleum flooring that he's collected over the years: Pastoral landscapes, pop portraits, sad and disturbing allegories, and pretty bungalows tucked into the woods.

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