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for Tue., Sept. 1
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  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Mexic-Arte Museum: Bruno Andrade Retrospective

    Mexic-Arte presents the first retrospective exhibit of Bruno Andrade, the distinguished Texan whose work is "inspired by nature, which he paints from memory and from his own interior vision."
    Through Sept. 1
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Northern-Southern: Baton

    This is a group show by relay, begun in July of 2020 as a method of socially distancing a community in the height of the pandemic: Artists took turns alone in the space, each adding to the exhibition. Now, as it nears its close, the exhibition resembles a community in which work converses and overlaps. With Adreon Henry, Vy Ngo, Dawn Okoro, Leon Alesi, Matt Steinke, Sev Coursen, Stella Alesi, and more.
    Closing reception: Sat., July 24, 3-9pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum: Curated Conversations

    This series explores and connects with the Blanton staff, streaming live every Tuesday at 5pm. The Blanton's collections are vast, as is the knowledge of these professionals. Click on over, we suggest, to enjoy a bit of both.
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  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Atelier Dojo: Remote Studios

    The local powerhouse of figurative painting, the art school that's the smart school for artists of all kinds, they've got a painting-along-at-home series going to help you keep your skills honed in these socially restrictive times, featuring live costumed models posing on camera and a thriving community of creatives rendering that lovely human biotecture from their separate studios. "Join us for a three-hour costumed-model drawing session. Use any supplies you wish, listen to music, share your work, chat with others. It’s a great way to stay connected with your art community!"
    Tuesdays, 1:30-4:30pm; Fridays, 6:30-9:30pm; Saturdays, 9:30-12:30pm. $5.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    Ballet Austin: Classes Online

    While you're home, wherever you are across the world,: you can still take a dance, fitness, or Pilates class with Ballet Austin. Ballet, barre, contemporary dance, hip-hop, tap, cardio dance fitness, and Pilates out the wazoo, so to speak, because there are so many varieties to choose among, and all taught by professional instructors – and it's all available 24/7, just like the internets.
    $3-7 per class.  
  • Arts

    Books

    Books, Books, Books in the ATX

    Don’t forget, citizen: The best place to get your reading material is from Austin's own Malvern Books or HalfPrice Books or Black Pearl Books or Bookpeople or BookWoman stores – in-person or online. (And for the ultimate in vintage collectors' editions and unique works on paper, we recommend the excellent South Congress Books.)Or try Bookshop.org in general – because Bookshop, unlike the online behemoth named after a river, shares the profits among all its independent-bookstore members.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Bullock Texas State History Museum: This Light of Ours

    This show features images by activist photographers of the Civil Rights Movement, telling a visual story of the struggle against segregation, race-based disenfranchisement, and Jim Crow laws in the 1960s. These photos capture the day-to-day struggles of everyday citizens and their resolve in the face of violence and institutionalized discrimination – with more than a dozen additional images representing activism and protest in Austin's own history.
    Tuesdays-Sundays. Through Dec. 6
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity.
  • Arts

    Comedy

    ColdTowne TV

    "Set your dial to CTTV for at-home entertainment seven nights a week on ColdTowne’s Twitch channel, featuring experimental improv, live podcasts, scripted readings, guest characters, and more. Whether you’re a front row sitter or like to chill in the back, you can join the conversation with our interactive chat or just kick back and relax as you recline into cyberspace." And, this just in: In-person improv and sketch classes have returned! See website for details.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Gender Unbound

    Throughout September, Gender Unbound is hosting a virtual showcase of newly commissioned work by trans and intersex artists and weekly livestreams of trans and intersex musicians, poets, storytellers, and artist interviews. (The Chronicle's Lilli Hime reports on it here.)
    Through Sept. 30  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    GrayDUCK Gallery: Everything In Tune

    We're pretty much over-the-moon, tbh, about Amada Miller's series of works created from data collected by NASA’s Apollo Missions. Because we're the kind of concept-art-hatin' fiends who love concept art more than almost anything when it's done well and is redolent of research and effort and – oh, listen:"During the Apollo missions, astronauts placed seismometers on the moon and conducted experiments such as crashing spent modules onto the lunar surface. These experiments led to the discovery of moonquakes – vibrations that resonated within the moon’s core for so long that scientists described the sensation as the moon ringing like a bell."So, for this show, small fragments of real iron meteorites are suspended inside bells of handblown silicate glass, mimicking materials found on the lunar surface. "Everything In Tune" represents our moon’s natural orchestra – the handbells are instruments as much as they are objects, and each gallery visitor will be invited to activate the bells, giving sound to a moonquake. Bonus: graphite rubbings made to look like close-up images of the moon taken by astronauts in orbit, and gunpowder-scented vessels made from astronauts' descriptions after they smelled moon samples back inside the lunar lander.
    Through Sept. 20. Free.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Landmarks: Self-Guided Walking Tour

    Well, it's always an event, isn't it? When you can take your smartphone to access self-guided tours of the outdoor public art sited by UT's award-winning Landmarks program? The answer (as long as the streets and sidewalks aren't dangerous with all this newfangled ice and snow) is a hearty, full-throated YES.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    MACC Galleries: Reopened!

    The Community Gallery and the Sam Z. Coronado Gallery in the Mexican-American Cultural Center reopen "with social distancing and additional health and safety precautions in place," and inviting reservations to see "Rosy Campanita, El Camino del Corazon, The Path of the Heart," which documents 13 years of struggle, persistence, and resilience between 2003-2016, and "Poética Textil/ Textile Poems," in which contemporary artists reveal their restlessness, inquiry, and research into the creation of fabric art via printing, weaving, and assemblage.
    Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm. Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Northern-Southern: No Outlet

    This is a group show of interventions and intentions at dead ends, sidewalk ends, cul-de-sacs, end-of-paths, and no-outlets, dispersed across Austin, with creations by Adreon Denson Henry, Amanda Julia Steinback, Amy Scofield, Emma Hadzi Antich, Laura Latimer, Leon Alesi, Mai Gutierrez, Ric Nelson, Sarah Fagan, Saul Jerome San Juan, Sean Ripple, Staci Maloney, and Tammy West.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Stephen L. Clark Gallery: Black Tulips and Dead Flowers

    This new show by acclaimed photographer Kate Breakey is focused on specimens of the plant kingdom and reveals itself like a series of windows into arcane botanical memories.
    Through Sept. 12, by appointment only
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    SUFFRAGE NOW: A 19th Amendment Centennial Exhibition

    On August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote. On August 6, 2020, the Elisabet Ney Museum debuted this new show for which women photographers nationwide were invited to share photos that comment on the Centennial of the Ratification of the 19th Amendment. The most eloquent images were chosen and are included in this online exhibition.
    Through Jan. 31. Free.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Social Distancing Festival

    This is an online community, as playwright and unstoppable force of creative nature Nick Green informs us, and it's been activated to "celebrate and showcase the work of the many artists around the world who have been affected by the need for social distancing that has come about due to the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19)." It's not Austin-based, this virtual and ongoing festival of all kinds of performance arts, but damned if there aren't a few talented Austinites among the eclectic mix.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Umlauf Sculpture Garden

    The Umlauf reopens its famed Garden to the general public. There won’t be any performances going on yet, as occasionally delighted crowds in the Before Times, but there will be all those expertly wrought sculptures, the bronze or stone cynosures from Charles Umlauf and others anchoring sight among the bright gardenscapes and tree-towered paths: Perfect for a strolling, fresh-air respite from yet another screenful of pixels in your all-too-familiar abode.: Note: The usual safety measures will be in effect: A limit of 30 visitors in the garden at a time; a one-way marked path to follow; masks and social distancing strongly encouraged; etc. (You know the routine: You’re an old hand at this pandemic shit by now, right?) Also, know that the Umlauf’s private-event rentals will resume with limited capacity set by local and state guidelines – and its summer camp program will proceed with those restrictions in mind, too.: See the museum’s website for details and to schedule an appointment.
    Tue.-Fri., 10am-4pm; Sat.-Sun., 11am-4pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Vault Stone Shop: Good Goods

    In which Chad Rea presents a social change souvenir shop that charitable consumers can peruse via the physical location's window or browse online. Choose from 28 single-edition art works by the activist artist, with a portion of the sales going to a nonprofit charity of your choice. Note: Donation amounts are assigned for each item and will be permanently printed on the signed artworks, so collectors can show off their good deeds.
    Through Sept. 17
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Virtual Hideout

    So many shows, so many themes, such a freakin' panoply of improv talents at this Hideout that it makes the mind, how you say, boggle. Longtime house troupe Parallelogramophonograph sets the performance bar high AF, but damned if their everchanging roster of guests doesn't sometimes knock it right off. The Hideout's got a full weekly schedule of entertainments for you online, and even some in-person shows, now! (Of course, this may change. Stupid 'ronas.) Check that website, STAT.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: 40th Anniversary Show

    Of course it's a group show, and if you're familiar with who and what the Workman's shown over these past four decades, then you know you're in for a brilliant feast of visuals. Works by all 50 of the gallery's artists will be on display. Angie Renfro. John Peralta. The Scribners. Malcolm Bucknall. Tracey Harris. Elizabeth Chapin. Ian Shults. Oh, we can't list them all! But you can see them all online at any time – or make an appointment to safely view 'em in person.
    Through Sept. 6
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Women & Their Work: Likes Charge

    The newest exhibition by that remarkable digital savant Melanie Clemmons transforms the gallery into a livestream temple dedicated to reimagining networked technology as a medium for spiritual rejuvenation and metaphysical manifestation. Why, your Austin Chronicle's Brenner reviewed the show right here.
    Through Oct. 8

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