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for Tue., June 30
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  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Atelier Dojo: Remote Studios

    The local powerhouse of figurative painting, the art school that's the smart school for artists of all kinds, they've got a painting-along-at-home series going to help you keep your skills honed in these socially restrictive times, featuring live costumed models posing on camera and a thriving community of creatives rendering that lovely human biotecture from their separate studios. "Join us for a three-hour costumed-model drawing session. Use any supplies you wish, listen to music, share your work, chat with others. It’s a great way to stay connected with your art community!"
    Tuesdays, 1:30-4:30pm; Fridays, 6:30-9:30pm; Saturdays, 9:30-12:30pm. $5.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Butridge Gallery: Grimm Re-Articulated

    Yes, you have to make a reservation. Yes, it's totally worth it – because the Julia C. Butridge gallery in the Dougherty Arts Center reopens (in a limited manner, with social distancing and masks) with a show of work by three artists – Nora McMillen Burke, Jon Nelson, and Marianne Levy – and it's all worth feasting your peepers on. But we daresay it's Levy's "Grimm Re-Articulated," with its array of reimagined and stunningly sculpted fairytale characters and situations, that'll warp your dreams for months to come.
    Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm. Through July 25. Free.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Camiba Art: Signs

    Currently open by reservation only, yes, but you should have no reservations about seeing this stunning exhibition by Dallas native Lee Albert Hill. You want an eyeful of big, bright abstractions via acrylics on canvas over board, handwrought yet almost machinelike in their meticulous design and execution? You probably do, especially in this case. Because it's like … um … like if someone hired Mike Hinge and Bill Sienkewicz to show how well tangrams could be used to illustrate subatomic events from CERN's bubble chamber – and then threw a fistful of chaos shards at the collaboration's results. The accompanying image here is one miniaturized example; imagine seeing a roomful of such intricacies at full size. Hell, imagine scheduling a private viewing of this show with gallerist Troy Campa: That's some solid pandemic diversion right there, tell you what.
    Through July 11  
  • Arts

    Comedy

    ColdTowne TV: Hey, How Are You?

    In which comedy writer Devon Coleman – aka The Black Charles Grodin – asks the most important question in the universe.
    Tuesdays, 8pm. Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ICOSA: Coping Mechanisms

    In advance of the upcoming Swec & Criscoe exhibition, ICOSA presents a series of front-window installations that are viewable 24 hours a day. "An imperfect show in imperfect times that recognizes our shortcomings and missteps, our pain, loneliness, and uncertainty, that aims to move forward carefully and intentionally. This work was made during the pandemic, but before the world exploded once again in response to the horrific murder of George Floyd, thrusting the world into a greater awareness of systemic racism and police brutality, and renewing energy and momentum in the fight for justice." Note: A portion of the proceeds from sales of the artworks will be donated to Six Square: Austin’s Black Cultural District.
    Through July 2
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    MACC Galleries: Reopened!

    The Community Gallery and the Sam Z. Coronado Gallery in the Mexican-American Cultural Center reopen "with social distancing and additional health and safety precautions in place," and inviting reservations to see "Rosy Campanita, El Camino del Corazon, The Path of the Heart," which documents 13 years of struggle, persistence, and resilience between 2003-2016, and "Poética Textil/ Textile Poems," in which contemporary artists reveal their restlessness, inquiry, and research into the creation of fabric art via printing, weaving, and assemblage.
    Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm. Donations accepted.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Stephen L. Clark Gallery: Black Tulips and Dead Flowers

    This new show by acclaimed photographer Kate Breakey is focused on specimens of the plant kingdom and reveals itself like a series of windows into arcane botanical memories.
    Through Sept. 12, by appointment only
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum: One Nation: Unraveling the Symbolism of Flags

    The Curated Conversation series explores and connects with the Blanton staff, streaming live every Tuesday at 5pm. The first installment featured Ellsworth Kelly's Austin, but you know the treasures don't stop there – and this latest installment's got Blanton curators Carter Foster, Vanessa Davidson, and Genevra Higginson (and UT doctoral student Phillip Townsend) discussing artworks that reinterpret, interrogate, and expand the narrative of national flags. It's the sort of vexillology that's increasingly relevant in these tumultuous times – relevant to you and your confederates. Well, maybe not confederates, ahem. To you and your fellow citizens, let's say. To all of us.
    Tue., July 7, 5-6pm  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Umlauf Sculpture Garden: Reopened

    The Umlauf reopens its famed Garden to the general public. There won’t be any performances going on yet, as occasionally delighted crowds in the Before Times, but there will be all those expertly wrought sculptures, the bronze or stone cynosures from Charles Umlauf and others anchoring sight among the bright gardenscapes and tree-towered paths: Perfect for a strolling, fresh-air respite from yet another screenful of pixels in your all-too-familiar abode.: Note: The usual safety measures will be in effect: A limit of 30 visitors in the garden at a time; a one-way marked path to follow; masks and social distancing strongly encouraged; etc. (You know the routine: You’re an old hand at this pandemic shit by now, right?) Also, know that the Umlauf’s private-event rentals will resume with limited capacity set by local and state guidelines – and its summer camp program will proceed with those restrictions in mind, too.: See the museum’s website for details and to schedule an appointment.
    Tue.-Fri., 10am-4pm; Sat.-Sun., 11am-4pm
  • Arts

    Classical Music

    Virtual ASO: The Austin Symphony's REWIND

    Conductor Peter Bay and company have teamed with the classical cats at 89.5 KMFA to release this show of discussion of and music fromtwo 2006 concerts, one with Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 3 and one with Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 61, featuring Joshua Bell.
    Until these damned coronas get the hell outta Dodge  
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Virtual Hideout: Improv Social Hour

    It's social – demented and virtual, but social. Join the Hideout crowd every weekday at 6pm for a Zoomed hour of improv games and antics where you'll learn a thing or two about comedy improvisation (their talented instructors will help you along) and your day will certainly be brightened. Yes, and maybe bring a friend with you? Even if that friend's a dog? "I'm a varmint and all varmints are welcome!"
    Mon.-Fri., 6pm. $10.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Reopened!

    Make an appointment, friend, and you can see these beauties in person. And if there's anything (aside from certain substances still criminalized by a failed system of law) that can elevate the senses and lighten the load, it's this bright collection of new works by Austin's Patrick Puckett. The artist's "large, bold canvases explore the human figure inspired by the artist’s life in the American South and often include symbolic references of both real and imagined nostalgia." And, we add, the downright Fauvist, polychrome exuberance of these paintings will likewise inspire your art-hungry eyes.
    Through July 3
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wonder From Home: Ghosts In the Machines

    Austin's Weird Homes Tour has gone, along with the rest of us safety-savvy pandemickers, online. And one of the first tours they featured – showcasing the affable historian Brandon Hodge and his massive collection of historical spirit communication artifacts and séance relics – was so popular that they're doing it again! Catch this new livestream, now presented in partnership with Atlas Obscura, as Hodge reveals the vast holdings of The Mysterious Planchette, showing and telling you about more eerie esoterica than you knew existed in this odd world of ours.
    Tue., June 30, 7pm. $10.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Yard Dog: Blacklight Paintings

    Yard Dog's robust site has a new show of bold visuals by Steve "Dream Syndicate" Wynn – painted to shift under blacklight – and the latest complex monochrome wonderments of Jon Langford's Song Paintings series.
All Events
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Akirash Online

    Sure, Austin's Olaniyi Rasheed Akindiya aka AKIRASH has an exhibition at the Carver Museum right now – and the place is closed, of course. But this Lagos-born artist also happens to have one of the most robust websites around, though you'll need a mighty big screen to get the best effect of his huge and colorful mixed-media creations and performance pieces.
  • Arts

    Books

    BOOKS: Pick 'Em Up Curbside!

    Don’t forget, citizen: The best place to get your reading material is from Austin's own Malvern Books or HalfPrice Books or Bookpeople or BookWoman stores. (And for the ultimate in vintage collectors' editions and unique works on paper, we recommend the excellent South Congress Books.)Or try Bookshop.org in general – because Bookshop, unlike the online behemoth named after a river, shares the profits among all its independent-bookstore members. And that Bezos fellow is already making enough goddam money, n’est-ce pas?
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ChingonX Fire: Group Exhibit

    Inspired by the Mexican American Cultural Center's annual La Mujer celebration – and by the first feminist of the New World, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz – this online group exhibit is curated by April Garcia and features womxn-identifying and nongender-specific artists whose artwork is tied to activism, feminism, cultural. and gender identity storytelling, environmental protection, and socioeconomic parity. Note: The exhibition will be online for a year.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Collection Rert: Twyla Rhode

    This second installment of the collection's online Vertual Solo series features the work of 15-year-old Austinite Twyla Rhode.
    Through July 18. Free.  
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Esther's Follies

    You don't have to slog your way through Dirty Sixth anymore, citizen – you can catch the arch antics and musical mayhem of the Esther's crew on video as they unleash fresh new sketches and songs and more about the hottest topics of the day. And there's all sorts of behind-the-scenes extras now, too, and it's all available via their Patreon page. You need to laugh right about now, so this is a good idea, right? And sports are important, sure they are, but wouldn't you rather be a local comedy supporter than a local athletic supporter? [*pauses for response, hears only crickets*] Right – leaving it to these professionals, then.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    grayDUCK Gallery: Point of Origin

    That's right! So make an appointment to check out this inventive array of creative work. (Note: Only five people allowed per appointment; no hugging, kissing, high-fiving, or even fist-bumping the gallerist.) But, look: Sarah Sudhoff's "Point of Origin" takes cues from the connections between sound and human emotion, here realized with suspended sculptures, sound installation, and debossed wall works that draw upon the artist's personal observations, cartography, and the mechanics of helicopters – especially those copters involved in the nearly 300 flights completed in just one month for Houston's Memorial Hermann Health System.
    Through July 12. Thu.-Sat., noon-6pm; Sun., noon-5pm
  • Arts

    Books

    HRC: Henry David Thoreau

    You know who, way back in the day, had the whole self-isolation thing down pretty damn well? "The author of Walden and Civil Disobedience" is the answer. Of course, Thoreau was only in "semi-seclusion" out there in the north country woods; but what he had to say – what he wrote, in many instances – is a valuable resource for people in these socially distanced times. Here, take yourself a virtual stroll through Thoreau's manuscripts (and letters and more) as beautifully archived in UT's own Harry Ransom Center.
  • Arts

    Dance

    Kathy Dunn Hamrick: Parade

    Watching even a well-done dancework online is sometimes a disappointing experience, because of frustrating camera perspectives or insufficient lighting or any number of things. But this longform work from KDHDC, this 2017 performance of Hamrick's Parade, it's like it was made for video presentation. Such shows are always better when you're right there in the space with the dancers, sure; but when the view puts you as close to right there as this one does, as if you're slightly above the audience's third row and looking directly onto the stage, and the choreographer's composition is remarkably engaging and the dancers' skills are able to match that power, and it's all lighted by Stephen Pruitt ... well, we're not just listing this to take up space, friend: It's recommended. Bonus: Check out the live band silhouetted by the background scrim – that's some beautifully percussive Drew Silverman action going on right there.
    Free on YouTube.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lora Reynolds Gallery Online

    Rarefied and clever, oblique and brilliant, sometimes blatant as a slap of vivid beauty upside your skull, often just what your rods and cones are craving by way of stimulation. Natalie Frank? The Haas Brothers? Tony Marsh? Yes, and more.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Modern Rocks Gallery Online

    What, you don't feel like looking at exclusive, worldclass, public and candid shots of international rockstars and music legends of times past and (almost) present? Alrighty, then. But you're totally missing out.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    testsite: How a House Works

    How does a house work? The folks at Fluent-Collaborative presented such a compelling answer from artists Andy Coolquitt and Alix Browne that, when the coronavirus shutdown went into effect, they turned the exhibition into a website of its own. So now you can click over for a visit, and – hey, who's answering the questions here?
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Contemporary from Home

    The Contemporary Austin's superlative museum galleries and sculpture park can be visited digitally through art and nature snapshots, tours, and quiet moments of reflection. Experience past performances and new happenings at the museum, discover artist talks and lectures, and stream films and playlists for these all-too-interesting times – in the comfort of your own home.
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Social Distancing Festival

    This is an online community, as playwright and unstoppable force of creative nature Nick Green informs us, and it's been activated to "celebrate and showcase the work of the many artists around the world who have been affected by the need for social distancing that has come about due to the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19)." It's not Austin-based, this virtual and ongoing festival of all kinds of performance arts, but damned if there aren't a few talented Austinites among the eclectic (and ever-growing) mix.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Poster Show

    Now here's some gorgeous and affordable visuals for anybody's favorite wall: A new series of 20-by-16-inch posters celebrating the creations of Workman-repped artists – Malcolm Bucknall! Ashley Benton! Helmut Barnett! Ian Shults! Those amazing Scribners! And many more! – with funds going to support those artists. Give it a look-see on the website.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Women & Their Work Online: 42 Years

    Did they say "42 years of contemporary art by women in our online archive," citizen? Yes, they did – and we recommend feasting your binge-weary eyes on what this excellent downtown gallery has to reward your clicks with.

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