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for Sat., Dec. 28
Recommended
  • Arts

    Classical Music

    Austin Symphony: Lush Life

    Listen: Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn collaborated on some of the most beloved jazz standards of all time, including “Take The A Train,” “Satin Doll,” and the legendary Ellington/Strayhorn adaptation of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite. This concert features Ellington hits and Strayhorn's elegant music, all sung by versatile tenor Bernard Holcomb, with full orchestral arrangements by Jeff Tyzik.
    Sat., Dec. 28, 8pm. $19-100.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Five Lesbians Eating A Quiche

    An award-winning, off-Broadway laugh-fest that'll take you back to 1956 and the Susan B. Anthony Society for the Sisters of Gertrude Stein's annual holiday quiche breakfast. Delicious discoveries and cheeky innuendoes ensue, as presented by City Theatre Company.
    Through Dec. 29. Fri.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 3pm. $10-25.
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Mac Blake

    He's a former Funniest Person in Austin, but "former" probably only because you can win that title only once – or else Blake might still be wearing that crown, strutting that faux-ermine cape all over the city. He's reduced crowds to howling shambles at Montreal's Just for Laughs and Funny Or Die's Oddball Festival and more, and his two comedy albums will make your earbuds giggle like the fools they are. But, listen, there's nothing better than catching this guy live – and now here he is, headlining Cap City, right before the decade ends. You know what to do, citizen.
    Dec. 26-28. Thu., 8pm; Fri.-Sat., 7:30 & 10pm. $14-23.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Mutt-Cracker (Sweet!)

    Darren Peterson's Circus Chickendog returns to The Vortex for the ninth year, his company of five talented rescue dogs and a talking scarlet macaw unleashing a fun show for all ages to enjoy. Also featuring humans Patricia Wappner, Monica Kurtz, and Sandie Donzica, this year's live-music-enhanced spectacle of juggling and unicycling madness includes a special performance by the Famiglia Gentile.
    Through Jan 5. Fri.-Sat., 4:30 & 6:30pm; Sun, 6:30pm. $15-37.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Ashley Benton and Christopher Lee Gilmer

    "Inspired by datamoshing, quantum mechanics, and the hyper saturation of imagery found in daily life, Gilmer creates oil paintings that explore the psychological effects of the figure through physical mutations that distort and merge various realities. Benton's figurative ceramics also portray a dialogue of the human condition, using symbolism as well as physical mutations to explore the depths of the subconscious. Less than reality and more than a dream, Benton and Gilmer’s work strives to give the viewer an alternative connection to the self." Note: This stuff will burrow into your optic nerves and make you feel a little weird, maybe, about the odd beauty it contains. So, yes: recommended.
    Through Jan. 5
All Events
  • Arts

    Theatre

    A Christmas Carol

    ZACH’s adaptation of the Dickens classic is a family-friendly spectacular, a musical sleigh ride through rhythm and time, infusing the traditional Victorian story with a score that spans all genres and eras. Directed by Dave Steakley, with musical direction by Allen Robertson.
    Through Dec. 29. Wed.-Fri., 7:30pm; Sat.-Sun., 2:30 & 7:30pm. $35 and up.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    A Tuna Christmas

    City Theatre presents Scot Friedman and Rick Smith in the local classic brought to such sassy fame by Joe Sears and Jaston Williams back in the day. See what hilarity ensues in the lead-up to Christmas among the many zany characters (all of them played by just those two actors) in the tiny Texas town of Tuna, "where the Lion's Club is too liberal and Patsy Cline never dies."
    Through Jan. 5. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 3pm. $10-20.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Carver Museum: Future Inhabitants

    The willful self-destruction of humanity by Earth’s most formidable species – humans – is the topic of New Orleans-born and Dallas-raised photographer Tia Boyd. Through a series of portraits, Boyd reveals "a surviving race of godlike women warriors who have come to terraform the planet for future inhabitants." And here's our full review of the show.
    Through Jan. 11
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Davis Gallery: Looking Out, Looking In

    This is an extensive group exhibit focused on the personal philosophies of premiere Austin and Central Texas artists. Sacred geometry, the importance of family, life and death, our connection to nature, and spirituality are among the perspectives that the artists (Randall Reid, Sam Yeates, Jan Heaton, Faustinus Deraet, David Leonard, Denise Fulton, and John Sager, among others) have focused on. What a fine follow-up to that excellent "Lone Star Wild" show, and what a glorious way to bid 2019 farewell!
    Through Jan. 11
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Dimension Gallery: Example Geometry

    Tom Bandage, inspired by the machinist’s craft and the volumetric simplicity of Bauhaus, attempts to capture the shape of thought through geometric contortions of material, removing traditional construction materials such as concrete, metal, and acrylic from their urban contexts and applying them to abstract conceptions of form and space.
    Through Jan. 18
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ICOSA: The New Flesh

    Is it too obvious to say "all hail" to this new exhibition of work by that storied creator of graphic psychedelia Matt Rebholz and the modern Magellan of sculptural form and texture Terra Goolsby? In any case, we recommend this "array of intimate pieces that meditates on notions of transfiguration, intracorporeal transit, and planetary departure, offering encounters with bodily and terrestrial alternatives for an uncertain future." It's this sort of thing.
    Through Jan. 4  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    J Gallery: Abstract Visions

    The Visual Arts League of Shalom Austin JCC presents four artists whose works display different techniques of abstraction: Patti Troth Black, Diane Sandlin, Jane Fier, and Ashley Mayel.
    Through Jan. 5
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Landmarks Video: Animation I

    Keith Sonnier’s videowork from 1973 is the latest to get the big-screen treatment in this ongoing series from your friends at UT's Landmarks program.
    Through Dec. 31. Daily, 7-10pm  
    ART Building, 2301 San Jacinto
  • Arts

    Books

    Line/Break Poetry Book Club

    Something literary's gotta be going on somewhere in Austin on the Saturday after Christmas, right? Look no further: Hosted by Julie Poole, this is a reading group for anyone interested in exploring works from Malvern's expansive poetry section. This month’s selection is muted blood by mónica teresa ortiz.
    Sat., Dec. 28, 1pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lora Reynolds Gallery: Drawing Tense

    The Brazilian artist Lucas Simões "thinks of his new works as drawings, even though they carry no graphite and have some dimensionality. He draws with an industrial laser, cutting angular or curved shapes into blackened steel plates, essentially turning them into elaborate paperclips that pinch, pull, and compress his trademark stacks of tracing paper." It's like … a little metal shibari for sheets of pulp? Ingenious, to be sure, and visually intriguing.
    Through Feb. 1
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Old Bakery Gallery: Small Art by Austin

    Let's get small, with works by 53 local artists.
    Through Jan. 2  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Prizer Arts & Letters: Transient

    The artist Rehab El Sadek continues her exploration into issues related to immigration, belonging, communication, and language, using sound installation, photography, and the written word to inspire consideration of residential spaces and our relationship to them and to each other. Visitors to this intimate Eastside gallery are invited to add their own reflections on where they live and where they have felt most at home. Note: The closing celebration features a reading by Naomi Shihab Nye and friends.
    Closing celebration: Sat., Jan. 4, 1-4pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum: Medieval Monsters

    From griffins and giants to demons and dragons, monsters have enthralled people throughout time. In medieval art and literature, these fanciful creatures give form to fears, curiosities, and fantasies of the unfamiliar and the unknown. This new exhibition, organized by the Morgan Library & Museum in New York, presents a lively array of monsters that appear in more than 50 illuminated manuscripts from the European Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Each of the three sections of the exhibition – "Terrors, Aliens, and Wonders" – will explore the ways monsters functioned as the embodiment of power, the representation of marginalized groups in society, or the inspiration for awe.
    Through Jan. 12  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum: She-Wolf + Lower Figs

    This installation presents new work that expands Lily Cox-Richard’s research into the contextual history of materials, making visible unseen systems that dictate materials’ production, value, and use, and engages larger questions of natural resources, labor, the specifics of place, and the politics of viewership.
    Through Dec. 29  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Contemporary Austin: The Sorcerer's Burden

    The complex relationship between contemporary art and anthropology shapes the subject of "The Sorcerer’s Burden: Contemporary Art and the Anthropological Turn," an 11-artist exhibition representing a wide range of media – including painting, sculpture, photography, video, and performance. And here's our own Robert Faires with a full review of the show.
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Santaland Diaries

    David Sedaris’ irreverent and cynical Crumpet returns! The outlandish tale of a Macy’s elf merrily jingles to life in this holiday classic. With 75 minutes of rollicking (and not so politically correct) fun, this evening will delight adult elves who like things more naughty than nice. Directed by Nat Miller and reviewed here by Paul Beutel.
    Through Dec. 29. Wed.-Thu., 8pm; Fri.-Sat., 6:30 & 9pm; Sun., 7:30pm. $40 and up.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Umlauf: Michael Ray Charles

    Yeah, no, this is a monumental showing of work – including a series of paintings commissioned for the exhibition – by one of the best, most provocative artists working on this planet. The former Austinite (he taught at UT for 20 years) Michael Ray Charles "is known for art that investigates the legacy of historic racial stereotypes of African Americans. Since the 1990s, he's created complex, layered paintings that challenge stereotypes, power dynamics, and social and cultural hierarchies." Ah, words can't even – but our Arts Editor Robert Faires offers a fine preview right here.
    Through Jan. 3  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Women & Their Work: The Meaning Wavers

    Stephanie Concepcion Ramirez and Betelhem Makonnen explore immigration and transnational identity, political repression, and the impact of silence in family narratives.
    Through Jan. 9
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Yard Dog: Creak, Crack, Creep

    This excellent venue of outsider art presents a show by Portland's Jesse Narens, featuring dark mixed-media depictions of mysterious animals, birds, and insects, all intertwined with branches, leaves, and raindrops, evoking the forests and coastlines of the Pacific Northwest.
    Through Dec. 31

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