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for Sat., Dec. 21
Recommended
  • Arts

    Theatre

    La Pastorela

    La Pastorela – a tradition since the 16th century, the annual yuletide play that's been performed all over Mexico and Latinoamerica – is adapted and directed by Teatro Vivo founder Rupert Reyes. This year, Clemencia Zapata returns as music director of the story of shepherds on a pilgrimage that pits them against angels and demons who test their strength and faith along the way.
    Through Dec. 22. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 2pm. $6-21.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    A Christmas Memory

    The Alchemy Theatre, with permission from the Truman Capote Literary Trust, presents that author's beloved 1956 short story, featuring Luke Hill as the narrator, "capturing Mr. Capote’s richly detailed memories of his Depression-era, rural Alabama boyhood with his best friend – an eccentric, 60-something distant cousin with whom he baked fruitcakes each Christmas." Directed by Michael Cooper, who previously helmed Alchemy's excellent Waverly Gallery production.
    Through Dec. 22. Fri.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 2pm. $25-35.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Five Lesbians Eating A Quiche

    An award-winning, off-Broadway laugh-fest that'll take you back to 1956 and the Susan B. Anthony Society for the Sisters of Gertrude Stein's annual holiday quiche breakfast. Delicious discoveries and cheeky innuendoes ensue, as presented by City Theatre Company.
    Through Dec. 29. Fri.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 3pm. $10-25.
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Fuck, It's Christmas!

    Oh, the glorious goofballs at the Institution looooooove Austin – and they love the people of Austin! But they also love to stage shows that make fun of the people of Austin, and this is one of them. "We think that every Austinite (whether you’re a native or a transplant) can agree that the city's changed a lot over the past year," say these honchos of hilarity, "and that makes it ripe material for the Fuck, It’s Christmas! cast to skewer." So, yes, join the crowd as the Institution's annual roasty-toasty run-amuck takes on the sacred cows – ripe and ready for skewering – of Austin, Texas, for your locally sourced and globally guffawing pleasure.
    Fri.-Sat., Dec. 20-21, 8pm. $10.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    It's A Wonderful Life: Classic Radiocast

    This show from the Penfold Theatre gang up in Round Rock draws audience members back in time to 1946, as members of the KPNF radio station are assembling for a live radio performance of, well, you know: George Bailey, that angel Clarence, Bedford Falls, and where the band Zuzu's Petals got its name from? Yes.
    Through Dec. 21. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. $15-31.  
  • Arts

    Comedy

    JR Brow

    Hi, Brow! Good to see you on the Cap City stage again, local boy – rocking the mic, waxing all acerbic on the habits of the great unwashed, skewering the legends of rock & roll with your guitar in hand. No wonder they love you on Comedy Central, at HBO’s U.S. Comedy Arts Festival in Aspen, and here in Austin where you'll be wielding a big can of comedy whupass and anti-Grinch spray as this year's pinnacular holiday approaches.
    Dec. 18, 20, 21. Wed., 8pm; Fri.-Sat., 8 & 10:30pm. $12-23.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Next to Normal

    Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey’s Pulitzer-winning musical explores how one suburban household copes with crisis and mental illness, taking audiences "into the minds and hearts of each character, presenting their family's story with love, sympathy, and heart." Directed by Lisa Scheps and Brian Cheslik for Ground Floor Theatre and Deaf Austin Theatre. Note: This production will be fully deaf-inclusive, with each character played by two cast members – one deaf, one hearing. And, look, here's what Trey Gutierrez thought of the show.
    Through Dec. 21. Wed.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. $5-45.  
  • Arts

    Dance

    Of Mice & Music: A Jazz Tap Nutcracker

    Tapestry Dance Company's Acia Gray starts it all off as Ms. Bon Marche, a dance diva who introduces little Clara to a world of dance by giving her a pair of tap shoes – and the journey begins with the Mouse King and his powerful style of contemporary rhythm tap leading an army of tapping mice in their battle against the Nutcracker. Performed to a jazzed-up version of the original Tchaikovsky score and beloved jazz classics, all played live by a group that includes Masumi Jones on drums, Eddy Hobizal on piano, and Michael Stevens on bass.
    Through Dec. 22. Thu.-Fri., 7:30pm; Sat., 2 & 7:30pm; Sun., 2pm. $34 and up.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Butcher of Baraboo

    Valerie is the town butcher with an axe to grind; her daughter is a pharmacist whose clientele extends beyond the drug store. Over one cold February week, the town cop – who just happens to be Valerie’s sister-in-law – will try to sniff out this family’s secrets and lies in the Wisconsin city where the ground is white with snow and the air is black with comedy. Carlo Lorenzo Garcia directs Marisa Wegrzyn's play for Street Corner Arts. But – did the Chron's Elizabeth Cobbe find the show to be as funny as it's supposed to be? And what does she think of that Amber Quick? See here for the full review.
    Through Dec. 21. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. $17-22.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Mutt-Cracker (Sweet!)

    Darren Peterson's Circus Chickendog returns to The Vortex for the ninth year, his company of five talented rescue dogs and a talking scarlet macaw unleashing a fun show for all ages to enjoy. Also featuring humans Patricia Wappner, Monica Kurtz, and Sandie Donzica, this year's live-music-enhanced spectacle of juggling and unicycling madness includes a special performance by the Famiglia Gentile.
    Through Jan 5. Fri.-Sat., 4:30 & 6:30pm; Sun, 6:30pm. $15-37.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Ashley Benton and Christopher Lee Gilmer

    "Inspired by datamoshing, quantum mechanics, and the hyper saturation of imagery found in daily life, Gilmer creates oil paintings that explore the psychological effects of the figure through physical mutations that distort and merge various realities. Benton's figurative ceramics also portray a dialogue of the human condition, using symbolism as well as physical mutations to explore the depths of the subconscious. Less than reality and more than a dream, Benton and Gilmer’s work strives to give the viewer an alternative connection to the self." Note: This stuff will burrow into your optic nerves and make you feel a little weird, maybe, about the odd beauty it contains. So, yes: recommended.
    Through Jan. 5
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