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for Wed., Oct. 9
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  • Arts

    Theatre

    Jesus Christ Superstar

    Broadway In Austin brings us the 50th anniversary tour of this award-winning Andrew-Lloyd-Weber-and-Tim-Rice phenomenon that highlights the extraordinary events in the final weeks of the life of a certain mythic Nazarene. Note: Originally staged by London’s Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre, this production won the 2017 Olivier Award for Best Musical Revival.
    Oct. 8-13. Tue.-Fri., 8pm; Sat., 2 & 8pm; Sun., 1 & 7pm. $30 and up.  
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  • Arts

    Theatre

    12 Ophelias (a Play with Broken Songs)

    Check it: "Shakespeare's Ophelia rises up out of the water, dreaming of Pop-Tarts and other sweet things. She finds herself in a neo-Elizabethan Appalachian setting where Gertrude runs a brothel, Hamlet is called a Rude Boy, and nothing is what it seems. In this mirrored world of word-scraps and cold sex, Ophelia cuts a new path for herself." This Caridad Svich play is directed by Jess Shoemaker.
    Oct. 3-13. Tue.-Fri., 7:30pm; Sat., 2 & 7:30pm; Sun., 2pm. $15-26.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Ao5 Gallery: Rust Dust & Lust

    That Gabe Leonard fellow – that guy with all those girls, guns, and glory – returns to A05 with his cinematically staged paintings of sharpshooters, gangsters, gamblers, and musicians.
    Through Oct. 12. Free, but RSVP for the reception.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Art Hop 2019

    Feel like heading a little north, citizen? This statewide juried arts competition, organized by Georgetown Art Works, features exhibitions at the Georgetown Public Library and the Georgetown Art Center.
    Through Oct. 26  
  • Arts

    Books

    Benjamin Moser: Sontag

    The author, in conversation with Clay Smith, presents his literary portrait of one of the American Century’s most towering intellectuals.
    Wed., Oct. 9, 7pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Charles White and the Legacy of the Figure

    This is one of two exhibitions on master American artist Charles White that will be mounted at UT this fall, celebrating a major donation of White’s artworks by Susan G. and Edmund W. Gordon, just as they participate in the centennial commemoration of the artist’s birth.
    Through Nov. 30  
    Christian-Green Gallery, 201 E. 21st
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Co-Lab Projects: A Land with No Name

    Sara Madandar's new series of paintings takes its inspiration from Persian history, exploring how complex notions of gender and national identity have changed in Iran between the 19th and 20th centuries.
    Through Oct. 26
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Cowboys in Space and Fantastic Worlds

    Yippee ki yay, space cadet, it's time to head 'em off at the Pass Nebula as the State History Museum presents an exhibition that spans more than 150 years of Western and science fiction history and features 100-plus artifacts (including props from Star Trek, Star Wars, Firefly, and other skiffy media fare). And our arch-geek himself, the estimable Richard Whittaker, also a part-time Sith Lord, reviews the show for you here.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Davis Gallery: Big Pink Blanket of Love

    In partnership with the Peabody Fund and Dell Children’s Medical Center, Davis Gallery presents a unique group show in support of: the gallery's own Jan Heaton, one of Austin’s premier: watercolorists. More than 60 artists have contributed 4" x 4" squares of their own artwork in an overall pink palette that will be hand-stitched together to create a pink quilt, symbolizing the community’s compassion, strength, and friendship – in memory of Heaton's daughter, Kristin Peabody, taken by an aggressive cancer after ten years of battle.
    Through Oct. 12
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Dracula

    This new adaptation of Bram Stoker’s classic vampire tale is a sensual fantasy with a surprising twist: a bold heroine who dares to defy the ruler of the night. "Seductive, romantic, and empowering, this foray to the dark side is a juicy date-night," we're advised – and that seems, yup, just about right. Written and directed by Steven Dietz for Zach Theatre, with a kickass cast featuring Sarah Kimberly Becker as Mina Harker and Keith Contreras-McDonald as the titular bloodsucker.
    Through Nov. 3. Wed.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sun., 2:30 & 7:30pm. $30 and up.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Generative Art Project: When Stars Collide

    20 million years ago, two supernovae collided – causing ripples in the very fabric of space-time. 20 million years later, generative artist James Pricer created cataclysmic portraits of this event using the actual gravitational wave data. The exhibition features a box set of eight gravitational wave prints, a collision video, two unique explosion prints, and several generative objects.
    Through Oct. 27
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    grayDUCK Gallery: Secure the Perimeter

    Some artists try to capture their city, their geographical region, and they succeed at it. Only the best will ever succeed as well as Austin's John Mulvany does in capturing his Eastside neighborhood. Listen: "Everything in life is present in the neighborhood," says the artist. "If you are inclined to walk around with your eyes and senses open, you notice things you might otherwise miss. A dead grackle in the road, the unkempt beauty of East Austin backyards, the violent magenta-pink veil of cherry blossom enveloping a vacant house, a cockroach carried away by ants. This exhibition is an invitation to look closer. The neighborhood, like the natural world, is in a constant state of creation, transformation and decay." And this is precisely what you'll see, in Mulvany's array of realist, atmosphere-haunted paintings on the familiar grayDUCK walls. (See Barbara Purcell's review of the show right here.)
    Through Oct. 20
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Link & Pin Gallery: Sketchings

    Alicia Philley and Emily Hoyt-Weber present their new body of paintings and sculpture, created around conversations about color, light, and shadow, resulting in an exhibition in which Philley’s colorful compositions of curving linear elements serve as a counterpoint to Hoyt-Weber’s mathematically inspired line drawings.
    Through Oct. 13
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lora Reynolds Gallery: Roy McMakin and Rosy Keyser

    McMakin brings us recontextualized furniture and untold (actually, very carefully quantified) numbers of coats of paint, with his "Two Bowls, a Cabinet Door, Two Tables, and a Window (with a Blue Wall)," and Keyser's got a new showcase of her vivid "Works on Paper."
    Through Nov. 9
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    MASS Gallery: Wicker Man Screening

    Because Samhain is coming up, and because the "Rotten Little Fruits" exhibition is still on display (through Oct. 19), and because Robin Hardy's 1974 movie is so damned good, this is happening now. Note: The screening will be outdoors, weather permitting; bring a blanket or fold-up chair, and BYOB. As police sergeant Neil Howie might've put it, "Oh my God! Oh Jesus Chriiiiiiiiiiiiiist!"
    Wed., Oct. 9, 8pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Modern Rocks: But I Remember When We Were Young

    Manchester-born Kevin Cummins has an international reputation as one of the world’s leading photographers and is famed for his portraits of musicians, including Joy Division, New Order, David Bowie, Nick Cave, Mick Jagger, Patti Smith, and Oasis. This weekend, Modern Rocks Gallery (now in its fifth year) launches the photographer’s first retrospective show in the United States, featuring his most iconic images.
    Through Nov. 2
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum: She-Wolf + Lower Figs

    This installation presents new work that expands Lily Cox-Richard’s research into the contextual history of materials, making visible unseen systems that dictate materials’ production, value, and use, and engages larger questions of natural resources, labor, the specifics of place, and the politics of viewership.
    Through Dec. 29  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Contemporary Austin: The Sorcerer's Burden

    The complex relationship between contemporary art and anthropology shapes the subject of "The Sorcerer’s Burden: Contemporary Art and the Anthropological Turn," an 11-artist exhibition representing a wide range of media – including painting, sculpture, photography, video, and performance. And here's our own Robert Faires with a full review of the show.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The People's Gallery: Call For Artworks

    The City of Austin seeks two and three-dimensional artworks in any medium from Austin visual artists, galleries, or visual arts organizations for the upcoming 2020 People’s Gallery Exhibition, which will be on view from February 2020-January 2021.
    Deadline: Oct. 27  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The People's Gallery: Exhibition 2019

    Here's the 15th annual exhibition at Austin City Hall, presenting a wide array of painting, sculpture, drawing, and other media by 113 local artists. This year, the exhibition includes a special selection of photographs: The Bold Beauty Project of Texas, featuring images of Texas women with disabilities taken by photographers from across the state.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Umlauf: Michael Ray Charles

    Yeah, no, this is a monumental showing of work – including a series of paintings commissioned for the exhibition – by one of the best, most provocative artists working on this planet. The former Austinite (he taught at UT for 20 years) Michael Ray Charles "is known for art that investigates the legacy of historic racial stereotypes of African Americans. Since the 1990s, he's created complex, layered paintings that challenge stereotypes, power dynamics, and social and cultural hierarchies." Ah, words can't even – but our Arts Editor Robert Faires offers a fine preview right here.
    Through Jan. 3  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Visual Arts Center: Fall 2019

    The fall array of exhibitions at UT's Visual Arts Center features Nikita Gale's "EASY LISTENING," Kenneth Tam's "Details," Maria Antelman's "Mechanisms of Affection," Saakred's "Sin Nombre, Sin Cuerpo," and more.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Box of Light

    Will Klemm, a realist master of tone and texture in oils, was one of the first artists represented by Wally Workman back in the day. By this time he's revealed more than 50 solo exhibitions across the country. "My intention is to communicate something abstract and interior, while still referencing our everyday lives," says the artist. And now the Workman walls are filled, in image after image, with his sublime success in achieving that intention.
    Through Oct. 27
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Women & Their Work: Wild, Wild Country

    Preetika Rajgariah’s new exhibition is where culture, capitalism, and classism collide on the yoga mat, with the artist exploring – through sculpture, video, and performance – how this spiritual practice with deep roots in Hinduism has proliferated into nearly every part of American society.
    Through Nov. 14

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