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for Sun., Sept. 22
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    Visual Arts

    Austin Museum Day

    e've got that university – you know the one – and a few others, so of course this city is nigh on crowded with museums: art museums, literary museums, historical museums, museums that are some or all of the above. And this day – at least on this day – admission is free everywhere and special events are scheduled and you can explore to your heart's content (and your beleaguered wallet's relief) so much of what Austin has to offer in a culturally archival manner. We've got more coverage elsewhere in this issue – look around, it's actually a damned fine general-interest site you're perusing – and you know the Austin Museum website will have a brimming plethora of details, right? Welcome to the ATX and its diverse troves of goodness!
    Sun., Sept. 22
    • Arts

      Dance

      Blue Lapis Light: In Light

      This latest Downtown spectacle of beauty and power from the acclaimed company features aerialists performing off the side of IBC Bank, dancers on Chinese poles, and an ensemble of ground-based performers. This event is not the sort of infrastructural phantasmagoria an arts-lover wants to miss, we reckon – so, yes, you'd best reserve tickets while you can.
      Through Sept. 29. Thu.-Sun., 8pm. $25-65.  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Admissions

      Just in time for the start of the school year, Joshua Harmon's ripped-from-the-headlines show, presented here under the direction of David Jarrott, takes a satirical look at the things some people will do to get their child into the right university. Starring Tim Blackwood, Beth Burroughs, Rebecca Robinson, Tucker Shepherd, Jennie Underwood, and the spectre of white liberal privilege.
      Through Oct. 6. Thu.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sun., 2:30pm. $23-25.  
    • Arts

      Dance

      Ballet Austin: Carmina Burana

      Carl Orff's soul-stirring composition built from ancient tales of drunken debauchery among a brotherhood of monks, presented as a full-length ballet? Indeed, squire – with choreography by Stephen Mills, accompaniment by the Austin Symphony Orchestra, and vocals (oh! those familiar yet still spine-tingling vocals!) by none other than the Conspirare Symphonic Choir. Recommended!
      Sept. 20-22. Fri., 8pm; Sat., 2 & 8pm; Sun., 3pm. $39-59.  
    • Arts

      Classical Music

      Beerthoven: In Search of a Beer Mug

      Jah, jah! Daniel Swayze's Beerthoven series of casual but classical shindigs returns with a full slate of beertastic and Ludwiggian shows, this season opener featuring the world premiere of Niko Schroeder's "The Ballad of Young King Gambrinus," commemorating the European folk hero and unofficial patron saint of beer. Bonus: The Aldebaran Saxophone Quartet, and – another premiere – James Parker's "Seven Streams, Seven Wonders."
      Sun., Sept. 22, 3pm. $10-$25.  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Instructions for a Seance

      Part DIY seance, part historical cabaret, this is one woman's attempt to contact and resurrect the escape artist Harry Houdini. Inspired by the Houdini archives at the Harry Ransom Center, this show by Katie Bender is "a funny, haunting, and haunted exploration of ambition, legacy, and familial responsibility."
      Through Sept. 29. Thu.-Sun., 8pm. $15-30.  
    • Arts

      Books

      John Vercher and Jamie Mason

      It's an afternoon of two new books at Sixth + Lamar, in which Vercher presents his Three-Fifths and Mason presents her Hidden Things.
      Sun., Sept. 22, 2pm
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Susanna Dickinson Museum: Notes from the Border

      The photographer Ilana Panich-Linsman gives us a small glimpse into the lives of those detained and displaced, via images captured on the U.S.-Mexican Border.
      Through Sept. 22
      411 E. Fifth
    • Arts

      Classical Music

      Texas Early Music Project: Oh, Henry!

      It's "The World According to Henry Purcell" for this season opener, and we're just lucky to live in it. Daniel Johnson and his talented TEMP gang celebrate the legendary English composer with a variety of works for the church, the stage, and the court – with guests Peter Walker, baritone, and Ryland Angel, countertenor, and more.
      Sept. 21-22. Sat., 7:30pm (at Redeemer Presbyterian); Sun., 3pm (at St. Martin's Lutheran). $5-30.  
    All Events
    • Arts

      Theatre

      :Humpty

      The Vortex is gonna rock your brain's cradle with this "twisted nursery rhyme pantomime" conjured up by that irrepressible Melissa Vogt, featuring an all-star cast grooving to an original score by Chad Salvata, and the whole fractured fairy-tale spectacle of it directed by Bonnie Cullum. Note that this darkling narrative from Ethos – it's funny and disgusting, charming and startling – is alive with adult aesthetics and not appropriate for children. And here is Trey Gutierrez's review of the show.
      Through Sept. 28. Thu.-Sun., 8pm. $15-35.  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Art for the People: Adventure, Fantasy, and Fun

      Here's an exhibition – adventurous, fantastic, and let's not forget fun – by 57 Texas-based artists, featuring a diversity of styles and mediums.
      Through Oct. 5
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Austin Fine Art Gallery: Beyond Borders

      Featuring art from nine artists from Mexico City and 11 artists from Austin, encompassing a diverse set of media, sizes, and styles.
      Reception: Sun., Sept. 22, 2-4pm
      2805 Bee Cave Rd. #430
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Blanton Museum of Art: This Is the Day

      This new show highlights new developments in Jeffrey Gibson’s genre-bridging practice, with 50 works made between 2014 and 2018 – including intricately beaded wall-hangings and punching bags, paintings, ceramics, garments, helmets, and a new video commissioned for this exhibition.
      Through Sept. 29  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Carver Museum: Future Inhabitants

      The willful self-destruction of humanity by Earth’s most formidable species – humans – is the topic of New Orleans-born and Dallas-raised photographer Tia Boyd. Through a series of portraits, Boyd reveals "a surviving race of godlike women warriors who have come to terraform the planet for future inhabitants." And here's our full review of the show.
      Through Jan. 11
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Cowboys in Space and Fantastic Worlds

      Yippee ki yay, space cadet, it's time to head 'em off at the Pass Nebula as the State History Museum presents an exhibition that spans more than 150 years of Western and science fiction history and features 100-plus artifacts (including props from Star Trek, Star Wars, Firefly, and other skiffy media fare). And our arch-geek himself, the estimable Richard Whittaker, also a part-time Sith Lord, reviews the show for you here.
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Cyrano de Bergerac

      In the midst of 17th-century Paris, Cyrano de Bergerac stands alone in his ugliness, intelligence, and aesthetic lifestyle … until he falls in love. The classic play by Edmund Rostand comes to life in a new, fast-paced translation, directed by Jennifer Rose Davis for the Archive Theater. And here's our review of the show.
      Through Sept. 29. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. $15-$35.  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Gender Unbound Art Fest

      This nonprofit, multidiscipline art festival exclusively features transgender and intersex creators, affirming trans and intersex people through positive imagery and narratives: created by talented artists from their own communities. Some of: this year's visual artists are sculptor Levi Leal, painter: Catherine Graffam, German digital artist Ford Kelly, embroidery artist EmbroidahBoi, French mixed-media artist Ariane Sirota, and Australia's own Liam Dooley. This exhibition at Blue Genie is the visual-arts component, yes – but there'll be performances here, too. See website for details.
      Sept. 21-22. Sat., 1-11pm; sun., 1-9pm. $10-35.  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      grayDUCK Gallery: Secure the Perimeter

      Some artists try to capture their city, their geographical region, and they succeed at it. Only the best will ever succeed as well as Austin's John Mulvany does in capturing his Eastside neighborhood. Listen: "Everything in life is present in the neighborhood," says the artist. "If you are inclined to walk around with your eyes and senses open, you notice things you might otherwise miss. A dead grackle in the road, the unkempt beauty of East Austin backyards, the violent magenta-pink veil of cherry blossom enveloping a vacant house, a cockroach carried away by ants. This exhibition is an invitation to look closer. The neighborhood, like the natural world, is in a constant state of creation, transformation and decay." And this is precisely what you'll see, in Mulvany's array of realist, atmosphere-haunted paintings on the familiar grayDUCK walls. (See Barbara Purcell's review of the show right here.)
      Through Oct. 20
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Groundwork: Artists Taking Risks

      What happens when diverse artists experiment, take chances in a safe space, and support each other? See it tonight, in this Lucky Chaos showcase of entertainments, featuring Irwin Tang, Alex Garza, Leng Wong, and more.
      Sun., Sept. 22, 7:30pm. $10.  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Holmes and Watson

      "It’s been three years since Sherlock Holmes went over Reichenbach Falls and was declared dead. When Dr. John Watson receives a cryptic telegram stating that three asylum patients are each claiming to be the late Sherlock Holmes, Watson is compelled to investigate. Could Holmes really be alive after all this time?" Jeffrey Hatcher's fine tribute of a play is directed here by Don Toner for the start of Austin Playhouse's 20th(!) season, and our Robert Faires reviews it right here.
      Through Sept. 29. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. $32-38.  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Jump

      This is Charly Evon Simpson's whimsical new play about the connections we all share, in which "lights flicker, hearts heal, and a young woman finds solace on a bridge." It's Shrewd Productions' 16th world premiere (!). it features a cast of Chelsea Manasseri, Allegra Jade Fox, Trey Deason, and Kyron Hayesby, and it's directed by Shannon Grounds for that same fierce company. (And – our own Robert Faires reviews the show right here.)
      Through Sept. 29. Thu.-Sun., 8pm. $15-25.  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Landmarks Video: Children of Unquiet

      The artist Mikhail KarikisChildren of Unquiet from 2014 gets the big screen treatment here, and you can watch: Videos are accessible to all and free to view.
      Through Sept. 30  
      ART Building, 2301 San Jacinto
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      MASS Gallery: Rotten Little Fruits

      The dark, celebratory, and comical work of Christine Garvey and Bonnie Staley has much in common with rotten little fruit – the outsider, problematic, misbehaving body – as both artists "reference the history, anatomy, pains, and joys of the female body to create objects that operate in a space between traditional classifications of painting, drawing, and sculpture."
      Through Oct. 19  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Over the Lege Part 4: The House Awakens

      This annual political satire show, focused solely on the Texas Legislature, returns to the Long Center for another skewering that brings together political insiders, improv actors, and comedy writers to expose the shenanigans of our Lone Star lawmakers. Bonus: Host Stephanie Chiarello interviews a Texas political celebrity, then welcomes a panel of “colleagues” – aka those improvisers – to yes-and the hell out of that material. Tom Booker directs; Denise Hudson provides the music; Janet Maykus and Amy Lowrey lead the troupe.
      Through Sept. 29. Fri.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 2pm. $21.50.  
    • Arts

      Theatre

      Saints, Sinners & Thieves

      This is an evening of three one-act plays – Soldier of the Cross and A Fool and His Money, by Sally Seitz, and I Am Not the Person You Have Made Me Out to Be by Marianne Serene – with characters exploring salvation, redemption, survival, and parental misconceptions of identity. Note: "Each play will be introduced and observed by Trudy, the character from Jane Wagner’s The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe." Directed by Sally Seitz and Barbara Abbate for the Paradox Players.
      Through Oct. 6. Fri.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 3pm. $10-20.  
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      SouthPop: Shoot Like a GRRRL

      This exhibit showcases the work of Martha Grenon, one of Austin's premier music photographers, her images capturing the excitement of bands performing in Austin since the early Eighties.
      Through Sept. 28
    • Arts

      Books

      TSU Faculty Reading

      Featured readers include Steve Wilson, Kathleen Peirce, Roger Jones, John Blair, and Cecily Parks.
      Sun., Sept. 22, 4pm
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Visual Arts Center: Fall 2019

      The fall array of exhibitions at UT's Visual Arts Center features Nikita Gale's "EASY LISTENING," Kenneth Tam's "Details," Maria Antelman's "Mechanisms of Affection," Saakred's "Sin Nombre, Sin Cuerpo," and more.
    • Arts

      Visual Arts

      Wally Workman Gallery: Cynosures

      Austin-based artist Sarah Ferguson has experimented with the trifecta of light, color, and perception for two decades, creating vibrant and immersive experiences for the viewer. See this show and witness spectral manifestation as never before.
      Through Sept. 29

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