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for Fri., Sept. 13
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  • Arts

    Theatre

    :Humpty

    The Vortex is gonna rock your brain's cradle with this "twisted nursery rhyme pantomime" conjured up by that irrepressible Melissa Vogt, featuring an all-star cast grooving to an original score by Chad Salvata, and the whole fractured fairy-tale spectacle of it directed by Bonnie Cullum. Note that this darkling narrative from Ethos – it's funny and disgusting, charming and startling – is alive with adult aesthetics and not appropriate for children. And here is Trey Gutierrez's review of the show.
    Through Sept. 28. Thu.-Sun., 8pm. $15-35.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Art for the People: Adventure, Fantasy, and Fun

    Here's an exhibition – adventurous, fantastic, and let's not forget fun – by 57 Texas-based artists, featuring a diversity of styles and mediums.
    Through Oct. 5
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Art. Sex. Magic.

    Here's a satirical, surreal, and sincere exploration of the inspirations and pitfalls of the creative process that unfolds as the archetypal hero’s journey, presented by artist and performer Jade Fusco. Not one of those shows mired in the dead past, this narrative takes place in our present, wasteful consumerist society and social-media age – where "nothing is built to last and the majority of art and identity exists on the internet."
    Thu.-Sat., Sept. 12-14, 8pm. $30.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Artifacts of Human Trafficking

    Artists around the world have created works in a variety of media, based on the words desperation, isolation, and deceit, for this show curated by Austin's own Amie Stone King.
    Through Sept. 15
    Shepherd of the Hills, 3525 Bee Caves Rd
  • Arts

    Books

    Atticus: The truth About Magic

    From the Instagram sensation (and internationally bestselling author of The Dark Between Stars and Love Her Wild) comes "another romantic and deeply moving collection." It is, we presume, to swoon.
    Fri., Sept. 13, 7pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Big Medium: Sanctum

    This new exhibition, curated by Alyssa Taylor Wendt, brings together a collection of international artists to present work – video, installation, photography, painting, and sculpture – in conversation around the concept of genetic memory. Featuring Beili Liu, Cordula Ditz, Scott Vincent Campbell, Birthe Piontek, Jaime Zuverza, and including an excerpt from Wendt’s latest film, The Memory Inheritance.
    Through Oct. 5  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Blanton Museum of Art: This Is the Day

    This new show highlights new developments in Jeffrey Gibson’s genre-bridging practice, with 50 works made between 2014 and 2018 – including intricately beaded wall-hangings and punching bags, paintings, ceramics, garments, helmets, and a new video commissioned for this exhibition.
    Through Sept. 29  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Butridge Gallery: The IN Between

    Through intimate portraits and abstract landscapes, Vy Ngo depicts the experience of physically and emotionally living in two different cultures, her show here a reflection of the space in which many children of immigrants live within their identities, their communities, and in the context of the American Dream.
    Through Oct. 5. free.
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Claudia Oshry: Dirty Jeans

    Here's an evening with the creator of the Instagram account @girlwithnojob, the former NYU student who’s made a career on social media about not wanting a job.
    Fri., Sept. 13, 8pm. $29.50-84.50.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Co-Lab Projects: That's Not Going Anywhere

    David Culpepper, founding member of Ink Tank Collective, presents a new show of works – models, maquettes, other mordant manifestations – in this busy Springdale General outpost of Co-Lab Projects.
    Through Sept. 28  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Cowboys in Space and Fantastic Worlds

    Yippee ki yay, space cadet, it's time to head 'em off at the Pass Nebula as the State History Museum presents an exhibition that spans more than 150 years of Western and science fiction history and features 100-plus artifacts (including props from Star Trek, Star Wars, Firefly, and other skiffy media fare). And our arch-geek himself, the estimable Richard Whittaker, also a part-time Sith Lord, reviews the show for you here.
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Cyrano de Bergerac

    In the midst of 17th-century Paris, Cyrano de Bergerac stands alone in his ugliness, intelligence, and aesthetic lifestyle … until he falls in love. The classic play by Edmund Rostand comes to life in a new, fast-paced translation, directed by Jennifer Rose Davis for the Archive Theater. And here's our review of the show.
    Through Sept. 29. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. $15-$35.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Dance Nation

    Here's the regional premiere of Clare Barron's Pulitzer Prize finalist, in which an army of pre-teen competitive dancers plots to take over the world. "If their new routing is good enough, they’ll claw their way to the top at the Boogie Down Grand Prix in Tampa Bay … but, in Clare Barron’s raucous pageant of ambition and ferocity, these young dancers have more than choreography on their minds, because every plié and jeté is a step toward finding themselves, and a fight to unleash their power." Directed by Jenny Lavery for Theatre En Bloc. And you can see our review right here.
    Through Sept. 15. Thu.-Sun., 8pm. $15-35.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Dimension Gallery: I, Too, Am

    This new exhibition by ceramicist Tammie Rubin cites Langston Hughes’ 1926 poem, "I, Too," a work that itself references Walt Whitman’s "I Sing the Body Electric." Here Rubin turns the gallery into an immersive installation of rock formations, mesas, mountains, and hills, as carved from construction foam and enveloped in resin, juxtaposing the majestic grandeur of the varied American landscape with how those same inspired ideas of vastness and expansion often fall short for its citizens. Recommended.
    Through Sept. 22
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Georgetown Art Center: Cultivated On Dry Land

    Yes, it's a ways up there, isn't it? Georgetown? But, tell you what, it's totally worth the drive to see these intricate, peculiar, gorgeous works of ceramics created by Jennifer Hill. It's a series in which the adept artist explores the visual relationships between land-based flora and marine life, and witnessing it is the next best thing to scuba diving around Cozumel with the ghost of H.P. Lovecraft.
    Through Sept. 21
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Holmes and Watson

    "It’s been three years since Sherlock Holmes went over Reichenbach Falls and was declared dead. When Dr. John Watson receives a cryptic telegram stating that three asylum patients are each claiming to be the late Sherlock Holmes, Watson is compelled to investigate. Could Holmes really be alive after all this time?" Jeffrey Hatcher's fine tribute of a play is directed here by Don Toner for the start of Austin Playhouse's 20th(!) season, and our Robert Faires reviews it right here.
    Through Sept. 29. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. $32-38.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Hot Dogs at the Eiffel Tower

    "What kind of parent knits their daughter a wool swimsuit? Or gives her a briefcase for her 11th birthday? Or keeps her in the dark about where she came from?" British actor and comedian Maggie Gallant – a longtime FronteraFest favorite – shares her childhood embarrassments and adulthood discoveries as she unleashes a Pandora's Box of hope, lies, and un très magnifique French Papa, in this hilarious and heartwarming one-woman show, as directed by Ken Webster for HPT.
    Through Oct. 5. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. $22-28.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ICOSA: Rhumb Line

    New work by Amy Bench and Jenn Wilson explores how narratives are structured: always appearing to move forward, yet occasionally twisting and bending, obscuring parts of the story. Filmmaker Bench addresses the often contradictory feelings associated with childbirth and early motherhood; painter Wilson invokes narrative via weaving stills from bygone television flops, found photography, memories, comic panels, and images from Song dynasty scrolls.
    Through Sept. 14
  • Arts

    Comedy

    Johnny Taylor

    This sardonic and personal Taylor is currently co-headlining a comedy tour with Stand Up! Records label mate Keith Lowell Jensen. But, hold on, it's Mitch Mekulsia who's opening for him at the Velv this weekend.
    Sept. 13-14. Fri., 9pm; Sat., 9 & 11pm. $10.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Jump

    This is Charly Evon Simpson's whimsical new play about the connections we all share, in which "lights flicker, hearts heal, and a young woman finds solace on a bridge." It's Shrewd Productions' 16th world premiere (!). it features a cast of Chelsea Manasseri, Allegra Jade Fox, Trey Deason, and Kyron Hayesby, and it's directed by Shannon Grounds for that same fierce company. (And – our own Robert Faires reviews the show right here.)
    Through Sept. 29. Thu.-Sun., 8pm. $15-25.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Landmarks Video: Children of Unquiet

    The artist Mikhail KarikisChildren of Unquiet from 2014 gets the big screen treatment here, and you can watch: Videos are accessible to all and free to view.
    Through Sept. 30  
    ART Building, 2301 San Jacinto
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Les Miserables

    Cameron Mackintosh presents the new production of Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schönberg’s Tony-winning musical phenomenon, direct from its acclaimed Broadway return. Remember how good it was? How it roused the rabble and galvanized the crowd? How it stirred the heart and the mind to greater glory? Could it be even better now? Listen: "New staging and re-imagined scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo." We daresay, hell yes!
    Sept. 10-15. Tue.-Fri., 8pm; Sat., 2 & 8pm; Sun., 1 & 7pm. $30 and up.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Link & Pin Gallery: BIG Little Show

    Works by 29 artists in a variety of media, each piece no larger than 15 inches in any direction. Featuring Leslie Kell, Jo Lagattuta, Carol Hayman, Shruti Mehta, Jane Pomeroy, Pete Holland, and Joy Timmons.
    Through Sept. 22
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lora Reynolds Gallery: Roy McMakin and Rosy Keyser

    McMakin brings us recontextualized furniture and untold (actually, very carefully quantified) numbers of coats of paint, with his "Two Bowls, a Cabinet Door, Two Tables, and a Window (with a Blue Wall)," and Keyser's got a new showcase of her vivid "Works on Paper."
    Through Nov. 9
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    MASS Gallery: Rotten Little Fruits

    The dark, celebratory, and comical work of Christine Garvey and Bonnie Staley has much in common with rotten little fruit – the outsider, problematic, misbehaving body – as both artists "reference the history, anatomy, pains, and joys of the female body to create objects that operate in a space between traditional classifications of painting, drawing, and sculpture."
    Through Oct. 19  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Plano

    Paper Chairs co-founder Dustin Wills returns to Austin to direct this new Will Arbery play that seems like, according to The New Yorker, “a David Lynch script performed as screwball comedy.”OK, and listen: "Three sisters are suffering from strange household plagues. The men in their lives keep disappearing or doubling; time keeps leapfrogging; and the slugs just won’t go away. Plano, Texas, seems to be not just a nearby city but also a malevolent existential state."Yeah, we like the sound of that. And those "three sisters" are played by Elizabeth Doss, Heather Hanna, and Hannah Kenah, so we're already lining up to get tickets. And Janelle Buchanan and Harold Fisch are in the show, too, FTW. And that newly returned-to-Austin Rubber Rep duo (that's Josh Meyer and Matt Hislope, yes) are also part of a don't-you-miss-it theatrical event.Recommended? Well, here's an update: We saw the show since we originally wrote this blurb. Our response? First: FUUUUUUUCK. Second: You know how they – whoever they are – say "If you only see one show a year, then see this one," right? Well, that. But, regardless of how many shows you see, don't miss Plano.Bravo and brava, Paper Chairs, what a freaky-ass masterpiece of stagecraft.
    Through Sept. 28. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. $20-30.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Russell Collection: Peter Max Retrospective

    Here's an exhibition from the studio of the legendary Max, featuring a significant nod to Woodstock, celebrated at three separate receptions.
    Receptions: Sept. 14-15. Sat., 6-8pm; Sun., 1-3pm. Free, but you have to RSVP for the receptions.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Scriptworks: Fronterafest 101 Workshop

    This workshop, led by ScriptWorks and FronteraFest producer Christina J. Moore, will guide participants through the process of preparing a piece for the upcoming FronteraFest. From resources for finding actors, directors, and rehearsal space to the ins and outs of the technical rehearsal, this class will cover it all. You think something just appears on stage, all ex nihilo? Don't be caught unprepared – give your project the solid foundation it deserves!
    Tue., Sept. 17, 7:30-9:30pm. $10.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    SouthPop: Shoot Like a GRRRL

    This exhibit showcases the work of Martha Grenon, one of Austin's premier music photographers, her images capturing the excitement of bands performing in Austin since the early Eighties.
    Through Sept. 28
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Blanton Museum: She-Wolf + Lower Figs

    This installation presents new work that expands Lily Cox-Richard’s research into the contextual history of materials, making visible unseen systems that dictate materials’ production, value, and use, and engages larger questions of natural resources, labor, the specifics of place, and the politics of viewership.
    Through Dec. 29  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The People's Gallery: Exhibition 2019

    Here's the 15th annual exhibition at Austin City Hall, presenting a wide array of painting, sculpture, drawing, and other media by 113 local artists. This year, the exhibition includes a special selection of photographs: The Bold Beauty Project of Texas, featuring images of Texas women with disabilities taken by photographers from across the state.
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    The Umlauf: Michael Ray Charles

    Yeah, no, this is a monumental showing of work – including a series of paintings commissioned for the exhibition – by one of the best, most provocative artists working on this planet. The former Austinite (he taught at UT for 20 years) Michael Ray Charles "is known for art that investigates the legacy of historic racial stereotypes of African Americans. Since the 1990s, he's created complex, layered paintings that challenge stereotypes, power dynamics, and social and cultural hierarchies." Ah, words can't even – but our Arts Editor Robert Faires offers a fine preview right here.
    Through Jan. 3  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Waverly Gallery

    Babs George stars in this Kenneth Lonergan tale of the final years of a generous, chatty, and feisty woman's battle against Alzheimer's disease. The show, a powerful work that "captures the life force of a woman and the humor and strength of a family in the face of crisis," is directed by Michael Cooper for the Alchemy Theatre. Look: Trey Gutierrez reviews the production right here.
    Through Oct. 5. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. $32-45.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Viewpoints Acting Workshop

    Three Cups Collaborative offers this opportunity to discover or renew the power of your physicality, voice, and creativity in a 2.5-hour workshop lead by Stephanie Courtney.
    Thu.-Sat., Sept. 12-14, 12:30-3:30pm. $45.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Cynosures

    Austin-based artist Sarah Ferguson has experimented with the trifecta of light, color, and perception for two decades, creating vibrant and immersive experiences for the viewer. See this show and witness spectral manifestation as never before.
    Through Sept. 29

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