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for Thu., Feb. 14
  • For Peter Pan On Her 70th Birthday

    Jarrott Productions presents Sarah Ruhl’s bittersweet comedy directed by Karen Jambon. A loving look at a family’s view of death, life, and the allure of never growing up. Prices range from $15-$30 with discounts for seniors/students/teachers/retired teachers.
    Feb. 14-Mar. 10, 2019  
    Trinity Street Theatre
  • Julia C. Butridge Gallery Call for Exhibits for 2020

    The Julia C. Butridge Gallery is now accepting Exhibit Proposals for the 2020 Gallery Season. Located at the Dougherty Arts Center in the heart of the arts district, the JCB Gallery is well known for its diverse exhibitions of artists and their work. We encourage both emerging and established artists to apply! Deadline to submit is February 17, 2019.
    Sun. Feb 17
    Dougherty Arts Center
Recommended
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Hedwig and the Angry Inch

    Director Dave Steakley and choreographer Abe Reybold bring John Cameron Mitchell's glamorous and rockin' musical classic – about "a fourth-wall-smashing East German rock & roll goddess who also happens to be the victim of a botched sex-change operation, trying to find a place to belong in America," of course – back to the Austin stage.
    Through March 2. Wed.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sat.-Sun., 2:30pm. $30-165.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Collection Rert: Double Date

    That in-home gallery of creative expression presents its first show of the (still somewhat) new year, in which two couples who were previously unacquainted have been tasked with uniting their creative powers to transform the gallery as they see fit – experimental soundmaking included. That's Liz Gomez & John Moloney and Megan McAtee & Kaya Sumer, transforming the room for all to experience.
    Reception: Sat., Feb. 9, 7-9pm. free.
    2608-B Rogers
  • Arts

    Theatre

    FronteraFest: Short Fringe

    One of Austin’s longest-running festivals, a legendary vehicle for theatre artists, actors, musicians, poets, and performers of all types, FronteraFest returns for its 26th year of showcasing some of the wildest – occasionally brilliant, frequently delightful, and almost always original – entertainment you're likely to see. It's a collaboration between that professional thespian powerhouse called Hyde Park Theatre and ScriptWorks and anyone who's got what it takes to put their act on a stage. The Short Fringe showcases performances of 25 minutes or less, and runs the entirety of the festival. Here's the main thing to know about the Short Fringe, in case you're not familiar with the whole FronteraFest deal, yo: The weeknight shows are a mixed bag but usually crowded with folks there to see friends do their stuff onstage; each Saturday "Best-of-the-Week" show is sure to be worth your time, but it sells out fast, so plan accordingly; the final week, the "Best-of-the-Fest" week, which is always the primo live-performance shit in town and is already completely sold out – we warned you about this, like, weeks ago, right? – except for the wild-card Staff Picks night on Thu., Feb. 14, 8pm, which has a few tickets still available.
    Through Feb 16. Tue.-Sat., 8pm.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Hopscotch: Light and Sound

    Here's a collection of wonders taking over the popular Blue Genie space for a month and a half. It's a showcase of interactive light-based installations by local, national, and international artists, each work requiring participation with the guests to achieve optimum amazement. Note: After 7pm, this spectacle is for ages 18 and older only.
    Through March 31. Fri., 4-11pm; Sat., 1-11pm; Sun., 1-9pm. Extra night: Thu., Feb. 14, 6-11pm. $15-23.  
  • Arts

    Classical Music

    LOLA Is for Lovers

    The 4th Tap series showcasing Local Opera Local Artists continues with this to-swoon-for Valentine's special, featuring the talents of those relentlessly romantic citizens Liz Cass, Carla McElhaney, Lindsey Pino, Veronica Williams, Julia Taylor, and Peter Stopschinski.
    Thu., Feb. 14, 8pm. $10.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    PrintAustin

    There’s one sure way for art to make a lasting impression: When the marks comprising a work are made transferable and forced into contact with another surface. Then, suddenly, look – born from an industrial matrix still wet with ink, it’s a print! It’s the product of a woodcut, an engraving, an etching. It manifests as a mezzotint, an aquatint, an image of drypoint. Hell, maybe it’s one of those screenprints that concert promoters use for pimping their bands, a bold AF poster created with the same sort of process that, when displayed in a Very Serious Museum, is called serigraphy.

    :

    There are so many different kinds of prints, we confess, that it’s better to direct you to Wikipedia for detailed background. But we wouldn’t be surprised if an eye-popping majority of those kinds – to say nothing of the abundance of subjects depicted, the profusion of styles engaged – were available for viewing during the sixth annual PrintAustin celebration.

    :

    This year’s iteration of PrintAustin runs from January 15 to February 15 and features a wide diversity of events throughout the city – including exhibitions, artist talks, demos, workshops, and more. We’ll be highlighting several of those in your Chronicle's visual arts listings as the fest continues, of course, so keep your eyes peeled this-a-way.

    Through Feb. 15  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Stuart Wallace: Future Artifacts of Sprawl and Sting

    Yes, this might take a little while to get to, as Georgetown is kinda up there, isn't it? But never mind that, because the end of the world will also take a while to reach, yet that's where we're all eventually headed.

    And a local artist – Stuart Wallace – has gotten there first, is the idea here, and he's brought back an array of artifacts that are as eerie as they are graceful. I can't properly express the odd and sublime aesthetics of what the man's wrought, but I can tell you that the pieces often include abandoned wasps' nests and ball moss and photos and rope, expertly arranged, and they're often framed in wood that Wallace has carefully charred with a flame thrower.

    Real talk: There's already too much to see in Austin, already too much for a listings editor to cover; WTF would make me take the time to promote this show up at the Georgetown Public Library? Answer: The sheer, stunning beauty of this work.

    Go ahead, make a whole afternoon of it, check out Wallace's "Future Artifacts" and that Atelier Dojo faculty exhibition at the Georgetown Art Center while you're moseying around, maybe stop for an exquisite meal at Jack Gilmore's Salt Traders Coastal Cooking on the way there or back. But FFS don't miss this show.

  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Feud

    In this new musical comedy from Texas Comedies and the ever-adventurous Crank Collective, it's Texas in the 1870s and an army officer is all that stands between an outlaw family and bloodthirsty vigilantes. Based on actual events in our state's tumultuous history, now on stage with singing, dancing, riding, fighting – and a live band. See a wronged woman seek her own brand of twisted justice! See old-timey citizens fighting over land and cattle! See this rip-snorting production directed by John Cecil!
    Thu.-Sat., Feb. 14-23, 8pm. $12-24.  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Three Musketeers

    St. Ed's presents Megan Monaghan Rivas' new adaptation of the classic coming-of-age story inspired by the novel by Alexandre Dumas. It's set in a 17th-century France where men and women are equal in their ability to serve the crown. This regional premiere features local MVPs Marc Pouhé and J. Ben Wolfe among a fine collegiate cast, directed by Michelle Polgar.
    Feb. 14-24. Wed.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sun., 2pm. $10-25.  
All Events
Ongoing
  • Arts

    Offscreen

    Austin Public

    Committed to freedom of speech and expression, Austin Public is a nonexclusive and content-neutral media studio that offers low- and no-cost training, equipment, facilities, and cablecasting services to all Austinites. It is managed by the Austin Film Society under contract from the city of Austin, and operates cable channels 10, 11, and 16, and live streams. New training classes are ongoing; see website for calendar.

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