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for Fri., Jan. 18
  • Julia C. Butridge Gallery Call for Exhibits for 2020

    The Julia C. Butridge Gallery is now accepting Exhibit Proposals for the 2020 Gallery Season. Located at the Dougherty Arts Center in the heart of the arts district, the JCB Gallery is well known for its diverse exhibitions of artists and their work. We encourage both emerging and established artists to apply! Deadline to submit is February 17, 2019.
    Sun. Feb 17
    Dougherty Arts Center
Recommended
  • Arts

    Dance

    A'lante Flamenco: Amor Fati

    A’lante Flamenco brings the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice and their tempestuous world to life through fiery flamenco guitar, searing vocals, and flamenco dance – with seven dancers and four musicians. Bonus: Alex Ruiz.
    Through Jan. 20. Fri.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 4:30pm. $21.75 and up.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Big Medium: The Contemporary Print

    The bright anchor of PrintAustin's inkstained vehicle of wonders is this exhibition of printmaking from 35 artists from around the world, juried by Anna Katherine Brodbeck of the Dallas Museum of Art. There's so much here that's so good, but, listen, there's also a new large work called Oversight by Art Werger – and that alone should be enough to draw you to Big Medium before the show ends.
    Through Feb. 16
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Butridge Gallery: Despite It All

    This is a solo show by the celebrated graphic designer Dave McClinton. Can faces, bodies, and historical references be used to tell stories? You bet your bold narrative hooks they can, citizen.
    Through Feb. 9  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    FronteraFest: Short Fringe

    One of Austin’s longest-running festivals, a legendary vehicle for theatre artists, actors, musicians, poets, and performers of all types, FronteraFest returns for its 26th year of showcasing some of the wildest – occasionally brilliant, frequently delightful, and almost always original – entertainment you're likely to see. It's a collaboration between that professional thespian powerhouse called Hyde Park Theatre and ScriptWorks and anyone who's got what it takes to put their act on a stage. The Short Fringe showcases performances of 25 minutes or less, and runs the entirety of the festival. Here's the main thing to know about the Short Fringe, in case you're not familiar with the whole FronteraFest deal, yo: The weeknight shows are a mixed bag but usually crowded with folks there to see friends do their stuff onstage; each Saturday "Best-of-the-Week" show is sure to be worth your time, but it sells out fast, so plan accordingly; the final week, the "Best-of-the-Fest" week, if you care about new theatre in Austin or just like to be wowed by some fierce stagework, you should get your tickets now, because this will be the primo live-performance shit in town and don't blame your Chronicle pals for not hipping you to it ahead of time, capisce? Okay, then.
    Through Feb 16. Tue.-Sat., 8pm  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    grayDUCK Gallery: Amze Emmons and Yoonmi Nam

    The wonders of PrintAustin are heralded in the excellent grayDUCK space, with Emmons presenting his records of informal temporary structures and ingenious vernacular designs, with Nam offering images of man-made environments and objects and cut flower arrangements, with a two-person show that complements and contrasts across the common ground of expert printmaking.
    Through Feb. 24
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Heartland

    This play was written by Gabriel Jason Dean as a direct response to the true story of the U.S. government’s textbook propaganda contributing to the rise of the Taliban in Afghanistan. This play draws a line from the Cold War to the war on terror and is a story of healing, grace, and connection. This play stars Lowell Bartholomee, Kareem Badr, and Kacey Samiee – directed by Rudy Ramirez for the Vortex. And here's the scoop on the playwright and the play's origins. For the love of all that might be holy, don't miss it.
    Through Feb. 9. Thu.-Sun., 8pm. $15-35.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    ICOSA: When Everything’s Been Said

    New works by Jonas Criscoe and Mark Johnson that explore the illusion of direction and the indeterminacy of visual language, charting the cacophonous nature of our contemporary environment while reflecting upon the incoherent facets of information that saturate our daily lives. Highly recommended graphic lingogasm in 3 … 2 … 1 …
    Through Feb. 16  
  • Arts

    Classical Music

    Jake Runestad: Hope Of Loving

    The choral works of Jake Runestad take center stage for Conspirare’s next recording, in which the composer's commitment to musically potent and well-crafted compositions aligns with current cultural questions about race, gender, orientation, and psychological challenges related to suicide and gun violence.
    Fri.-Sat., Jan. 18-19, 8pm. $20-65.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Link & Pin Gallery: Viscosity

    This early part of the glorious, sprawling PrintAustin initiative is an exhibition, organized by Flash Collective, featuring hand-pulled prints from 24 female artists of varying ethnic backgrounds from around the United States, Canada, and Finland. Note: "Viscosity" is a declaration against marginalization.
    Reception: Sat., Feb. 9, 6-8pm
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Paradise

    This bluegrass comedy brings its "irreverent, heart-warming, toe-tapping show" to Austin before heading across the country. Imagine a sort of Music Man in a Southern coal mining town, as a charismatic preacher, saucy stripper, and greedy Hollywood production company show up to create their own version of the American Dream. Directed by Michael Myers for Austin Playhouse.
    Through Feb. 3. Thu.-Fri., 8pm; Sat., 2 & 8pm; Sun., 5pm. $38-42.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    PrintAustin

    There’s one sure way for art to make a lasting impression: When the marks comprising a work are made transferable and forced into contact with another surface. Then, suddenly, look – born from an industrial matrix still wet with ink, it’s a print! It’s the product of a woodcut, an engraving, an etching. It manifests as a mezzotint, an aquatint, an image of drypoint. Hell, maybe it’s one of those screenprints that concert promoters use for pimping their bands, a bold AF poster created with the same sort of process that, when displayed in a Very Serious Museum, is called serigraphy.

    :

    There are so many different kinds of prints, we confess, that it’s better to direct you to Wikipedia for detailed background. But we wouldn’t be surprised if an eye-popping majority of those kinds – to say nothing of the abundance of subjects depicted, the profusion of styles engaged – were available for viewing during the sixth annual PrintAustin celebration.

    :

    This year’s iteration of PrintAustin runs from January 15 to February 15 and features a wide diversity of events throughout the city – including exhibitions, artist talks, demos, workshops, and more. We’ll be highlighting several of those in your Chronicle's visual arts listings as the fest continues, of course, so keep your eyes peeled this-a-way.

    Through Feb. 15  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Seeing Through Darkness

    The Austin-based artist Eliza Thomas works with ink on kozo paper, exploring the beauty of decay. This results in a visual dynamic of strength and unexpected calm that dominates Thomas’ large-scale works.
    Through Jan. 26
All Events
Ongoing
  • Arts

    Offscreen

    Austin Public

    Committed to freedom of speech and expression, Austin Public is a nonexclusive and content-neutral media studio that offers low- and no-cost training, equipment, facilities, and cablecasting services to all Austinites. It is managed by the Austin Film Society under contract from the city of Austin, and operates cable channels 10, 11, and 16, and live streams. New training classes are ongoing; see website for calendar.

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