Home Events Arts

for Sat., June 23
Recommended
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Dimension Gallery: Infinity X Loop

    Damn it, Dimension Gallery, can't you just let yourself be pigeonholed? But, no – and we blame Colin McIntyre's Resonant Lung for encouraging this sort of thing – you've got to offer up an intriguing wonderment that's partly a visual arts event and partly an experimental musical gig, as Portland's Randall "Amulets" Taylor surgically modifies cassettes to craft self-contained repeating units with configurations for longer loops, literally running the tape out of the housing and through the gallery space. "The loops surround the viewer with the magnetic tape itself in a ceaseless circuit, creating a sonic tapestry that stretches and degrades toward infinity." Recommended.
    Through Aug. 14
  • Arts

    Comedy

    It's … Hideoutrageous!

    There's a stage upstairs, there's a stage downstairs, there's coffee all over the place and all sorts of shows and classes here. Thursday brings you (gasp!) an early Parallelogramophonograph show and the Free Fringe of improv. Friday's got the Grandslam Comedy Hour with Best-of-Austin badasses The Knuckleball Now, followed by that Big Bash, a Threefer of troupes, and then the TheatreDome raging all shiny and chrome. Then, on Saturday night, after The Well-Made Play, it's La Vida de los Muertos, rising again to show you the life of the dead. And, oh, don't miss the competitive improv donnybrook of Maestro! See website for more.
  • Arts

    Dance

    Locked-In

    Andrea Ariel Dance Theatre presents this kinetic fusion of original live music, dance, and Soundpainting that explores the consequences and implications of all the devices in our increasingly digital lives. Bonus: Yuliya Lanina's Internal Emergency Broadcast System.
    June 21-24. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. $15-25.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Northern-Southern: Deliriums

    Now here's a compelling thing: That maker of musical machinery, Matthew "Octant" Steinke, has a new solo exhibition in this intimate gallery (curated by the John-Pauls' own Phillip Niemeyer). We mean, who wouldn't want to experience the odd marvel of "three acoustic robots singing to each other, round-robin style, mimicking a group therapy session," right? And, oh, look – that Brenner fellow reviews the show right here.
    Through July 30. Saturdays, 3:30-6pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    This Is a Test of the Internal Emergency Broadcast System

    This is also a multimedia art event and a one-woman show. That one woman is Yuliya Lanina, and so all we can tell you is that you'll be missing out like whoa if you don't see what the relentlessly inventive artist is up to this time. Painting, interactive sculpture, animation, and performance – and all of it exploring "the mechanized nature of human life and a state of perpetual unrest." Recommended.
    Closing reception: Fri., June 29, 7-9pm. Free.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Art Swap at the Ney Museum

    This collaboration between the Ney Museum and Big Medium is an opportunity for artists to trade their work for another artist's work. It's especially worthwhile, since, economic insanity being what it is, artists are often those least able to afford to buy someone else's art, n'est-ce pas? (Is that, what? Is that irony, Alanis?) Bonus: This welcome exchange of goods and ideas starts off with a free breakfast.
    Sat., June 23, 10am-2pm. Free.
  • Arts

    Dance

    Austin Belly Dance Convention

    Here's the annual ATX gathering that celebrates the hip-twitching, ab-defining arts of time-honored Eastern dance styles, featuring three days and nights of intensive workshops and live music and acclaimed performers from all over, all the rocks getting sharky with a seductive beat and a shimmer of zills in a variety of venues.
    Fri.-Sun., June 22-24. $20-300.  
    Various locations
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Butridge Gallery: Stained SLABs

    What streetstyle wonders has J Muzacz wrought on the walls of the DAC's Butridge Gallery? See our review right here for a look before you go.
    Through July 14
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Davis Gallery: Of Warp and Weft

    The elegant carved wood sculptures of Caprice Pierucci. The photographs of delicate cheesecloth drapings by Charles Heppner. Together they make for a compelling dialog of harmony, form, and composition – complicating the walls of this excellent gallery. (See our full review right here.) Recommendation: See the art, then grab some great food at the Soup Peddler location just a few blocks away.
    Through July 21
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Lucky Stiff

    Here's that musical comedy by Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty, in which an unassuming English shoe salesman inherits $6 million from an American uncle. But there's a catch: He has to take a vacation to Monte Carlo with his uncle’s embalmed body and convince folks that the man’s still alive. Michael McKelvey directs, and the cast is scary good.
    Through June 24. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. $17-40.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Pump Project: Farewell Fundraiser

    They have to leave their longtime digs. (Yeah – you know how that kind of thing goes.) They're welcoming alumni, gallery attendees, the Austin arts community, donors, and all PP supporters one last time to come and visit the iconic warehouse to say farewell to friends, artists, the building, and the pump. They're also raising money for relocation costs for their new location.
    Sat., June 23, 7-11pm. Free, but donations accepted, and RSVP.  
All Events
Ongoing
  • Arts

    Offscreen

    Austin Public

    Committed to freedom of speech and expression, Austin Public is a nonexclusive and content-neutral media studio that offers low- and no-cost training, equipment, facilities, and cablecasting services to all Austinites. It is managed by the Austin Film Society under contract from the city of Austin, and operates cable channels 10, 11, and 16, and live streams. New training classes are ongoing; see website for calendar.

Information is power. Support the free press, so we can support Austin.   Support the Chronicle