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for Fri., May 28
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  • Community

    Kids

    ¡VAMONOS! A Caminos Talk Show

    Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center's Caminos program has created ¡VAMONOS!, an arts and variety show by teens for teens. Tune in via Facebook Live or Instagram TV.
    Every other Friday, 6pm  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Blue Genie Art Bazaar: New May Market

    The creators of the Blue Genie Art Bazaar present a new spring arts event called May Market, a free, family-friendly experience showcasing the work of regional artisans and craftspeople under one roof with centralized checkout. "This is the ideal place to shop for locally made, one-of-a-kind gifts for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, graduations, anniversaries, weddings, and more." That's what the press release says, anyway, trying to entice us in; thing is, that's even a bit too humble: We know what sort of market the Blue Genie gathers, and it's sure to be a lively splendorama of well-made goods coveted by anyone with a taste for the original, off-beat, and brilliantly homegrown.
    Through May 30. Fri.-Sun., 10am-8pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Cloud Tree Studios: Connection – Series I

    Okay, you want a deeply wonderful, life-enriching experience in this town right now? Go here. See this show. See this exhibition of Prentiss Douthit's oil-on-linen portraits of random strangers, portraits that are paired with the pictured ones' answers to questions posed by the artist. Note: Bring your earbuds, so you can hear the recordings of those questions and answers while you drink in the well-rendered draughts of humanity Douthit has so carefully provided.
    Reception: Sat., May 15, 4-10pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Davis Gallery: Nuevo Mundo

    Now here's a show that's well worth seeing: The new exhibition from Gladys Poorte, displaying paintings and drawings of a new world populated with unknown peoples, animals, and plants. A world rife with untold treasures and dangers. A place, as wrought so colorfully by Poorte, that it might've been the homeworld for that legendary Codex Seraphinianus.
    Through June 12
  • Arts

    Theatre

    Heroic Dose

    Surely those Rude Mechs aren't planning on treating everyone to a hit of acid on Bicycle Day, right? Surely this latest multimedia, assorted-deliveries, unique community engagement project of theirs will only suggest or roughly replicate the effects of that psychedelic experience? Although who the fuck knows, these days? Especially since this is the award-winning, wholly entertaining, and paradigm-twisting Rudes we're talking about? Listen: "We will create an artistic circle of insight in which members will receive messages, signs, experiences, medicine, prayers, happenings and access to insights now and thru the near and far futures. These communications will begin but not be limited to the USPS, electronic mail, phone calls, gatherings, bonfires, scripture, visitations and visions. This ceremony does not promise us absolute truth. However, art can arise throughout our journeys and change can follow as that art is integrated into our daily lives in this urban jungle." Our professional recommendation: Get on it, voyager.
    It's already begun and it runs until, oh god, it could really be whatever. Pay what you can.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Lydia Street Gallery: Un/Common Thread

    Amy Scofield uses humanity's material discards to create intuitively inspired works of magic. "My work addresses conservation, consumerism, notions of value and attachment, through sculpture and installations made from already existing materials," says the artist. "I've used thousands of discarded bike tubes, zillions of salvaged Mylar strips from mailing envelopes, dozens of yards of recycled city water pipe, hundreds of dead trees, shards of dried mud or twisty vines to create works that ask the viewer to reconsider what is meaningful." See for yourself, now, at Scofield's latest exhibition in the Lydia Street Gallery.
    Reception: Fri., May 14, 6-9pm
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Prizer Arts & Letters: A Cartography of Solitude

    Stephen Pruitt, a mensch in so many creative industries – whether behind the scenes, designing the lights and sets of the better theatrical experiences in this town, or on the stage itself, performing explications of science as if he were some fearless combo of Laurie Anderson and Andy Kaufman – this Pruitt's revealing a show of stark and atmospheric photography at the Prizer gallery on East Cesar Chavez. Listen: "For years, I’ve taken long adventures with just my camera and journal for company, and in those travels, I’ve experienced some stunning places that seem to revel in their remoteness, in their quiet, in their inhospitality, unless you’re willing to accept their terms – no easy meals, no water, no roads – and stay only as long as you can be self-sufficient. This installation is both an exploration of those places – places that emphasize how small and ephemeral we are, how big the world is – and the many different ways that we experience solitude internally.” Suggestion: Avail yourself of this opportunity, citizen. Bonus: The photographs will be illuminated every night (8-11pm) and can be seen from viewing platforms outside the gallery.
    May 14-June 12
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Recspec Gallery: Quarantine Drawings

    New drawings created during pandemic quarantine by that maestro of color and balance, Adrian Landon Brooks.
    Through May 31  
  • Arts

    Theatre

    The Mysterious Affair at Styles

    Austin Playhouse's own Lara Toner Haddock has gone and adapted Agatha Christie's first published novel? Yes – and this debut opus features none other than the sharply mustachio'd Hercule Poirot. Featuring a sockdolager cast – Ben Wolfe (as Poirot himself), Scott Shipman, Toby Minor, Lara Toner, Sarah Chong Harmer, Sarah Fleming Walker, Ben Bazaěn, Robert Deike, Joseph Garlock, Babs George, Claire Grasso, Huck Huckaby, Marc Pouhé, Ken Webster, and Cyndi Williams – directed by that same Haddock, this murder mystery may be just what you need to transition out of the pandemic and into a semblance of former normalcy. Note: "Employing a hybrid method of theatrical filming, actors will be captured using both cinematic and traditional live performance approaches. To enhance the experience, early purchasers will electronically receive exclusive clues designed for the virtual whodunnit." Available for online viewing with live Q&As after each performance, and – regardez-vous! – here's a video trailer for the show.
    May 21-June 5. Thu.-Sun., 7:30pm. $15-18.  
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    Wally Workman Gallery: Spring and All

    "Patrick Puckett's paintings are known for their bold colors and strong leisurely figures, executed with confident interaction between paint application, shape, color and texture." Like, the feeling you get when you've had your second vaccine, and you've suffered through that One Day of Bleh, and now, even though there's still a pandemic going on, you feel so much safer and ready to take on the world again, just as things are starting to reopen and spring is launching into its brightest phase of green beauty before summer comes a-blazing down our paths again? That feeling? This show – Puckett's work in general – captures that feeling. Welcome yourself back to Austin, we suggest, at the Workman Gallery sometime this month.
    Through May 29
  • Arts

    Visual Arts

    West Chelsea Contemporary: Icons & Vandals

    It's the swanky venue's "most monumental" show yet, featuring works by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Ai WeiWei, Roy Lichtenstein, and a slew of other creative provocateurs who have subverted the contemporary art world throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. Note: Beginning May 28, Queer Eye’s Jonathan Van Ness will add a curation of emerging artists to be featured alongside the current exhibition. Bonus: On Juneteenth, there'll be a limited run of new works by Def Jam Records' own Cey Adams.
    May 15-July 11
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