First Look: Eberly

Victorian and midcentury modern meet in contemporary space

photo by Rochelle Tschida

A mix of Victorian and midcentury modern, Eberly embellishes its design with elaborate plaster pieces and custom tile work throughout three spaces found in the restaurant. Eberly’s concept pays homage to Angelina Eberly who rebelled against President Sam Houston by firing a cannon to prevent a riot and keep Austin as the capital of Texas.

Photo by John Anderson

The Cedar Tavern, study, and dining rooms are all unique from one another but are tied together by hints of blue and brass lighting and features. The idea behind the three different rooms at Eberly was envisioned in collaboration with Michael Dickson, of ICON Design + Build and Mickie Spencer, interior designer and co-owner of Swan Dive and Hillside Farmacy. The flow is supposed to represent different transitions during the day, where guests could work and read in the study, enjoy happy hour in the tavern, and finish the day with dinner in the dining room.

Photo by John Anderson

The Cedar Tavern space is focused on the historic 150-year-old cedar bar, which was disassembled and relocated from Greenwich Village in New York City to Austin after Stubb’s co-founders Eddy Patterson and John Scott bought the location after it closed in 2006. The Cedar Tavern bar was a popular hangout spot for artists such as Bob Dylan, Jackson Pollock, and many others who would come together after weekly salons. With the bar as the focal point, elaborate tile work done by Spencer covers most of the room, complementing the details located on the bar. With an open space layout and hotel inspired communal lounge chairs, guests are invited to friendly conversation and a relaxed atmosphere. Pops of blue and deep reds and browns throughout the space bring a cozy vibe where guests can relax and drink an Old Fashioned.

Photo by John Anderson

The space that connects the Cedar Tavern and the dining room is the study, which serves as a creative workplace and is inspired by circa-1800s British greenhouses. The large windows and natural lighting are surrounded by metal pillars that put an emphasis on the walls and center of the room. The walls are decorated with shelves that hold an assortment of local newspapers and a variety of books that are sourced by Scott’s late mother, who was a former professor at Texas Tech University. Several marble slabbed tables and brown leather chairs offer open seating and a comfortable work place. Lounge couches similar to the ones found in the tavern tie the two rooms together to incorporate the overall concept.

Photo by John Anderson

On the other side of the study, the dining room space brings a modern twist to old contemporary furniture by incorporating blue velvet booths, brown leather iron stools and chairs, brass lamps, and counter tops. The mahogany wood wall panels surrounding the room were inspired by the midcentury modern furniture designer Kent Coffey, but with an art nouveau twist. The floors and pillars still incorporate the custom tile work found in the tavern room. The dining room tables, bathroom countertops, and concrete tiles – designed by local sculptor Paul Oglesby – bring an elegant but modern twist to the design of the room. The space is inviting and appealing to the eye, and the bar features a part of the original Cedar Tavern bar, bringing the two spaces together.

Photo by Rochelle Tschida

The tavern room menu offers classic cocktails and local craft beers, with a cocktail program by Kelon Bryant, who tended bar at the Continental Club and Justine’s Brasserie. It also features dishes like charcuterie and cheese featuring an artisan cheese selection and a variety of pairings such as jams, mustards, and marinated olives. For a heartier appetite, the menu features American classics such as duck fat potatoes – served with duck gravy, cheese curds, and San Marzano ketchup – alongside short rib sliders.

Photo by Rochelle Tschida

The menu for the dining room was designed by executive chef Jim Tripi, the former EC at Bee Cave’s Spanish Oak Golf Club, and executive pastry chef Natalie Gazaui, former executive pastry chef at McGuire Moorman Hospitality, incorporates American classics with a modern twist. The menu emphasizes local and seasonal availability and offers both lighter and heavier fares. Lighter items include wood roasted oysters Angelina and tuna tartare, as well as a variety of salads and meat options. The heavier fare includes venison and quail that sits on huckleberry preserves and pickled cabbage, and their family-style dishes like the bone-in rib eye and "pot of goodness," which features a variety of seafood and wood-roasted vegetables.

Eberly
615 S. Lamar, 512/916-9000
Sun.-Fri., 5pm-12mid; Sat. 5pm-1am
www.eberlyaustin.com

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KEYWORDS FOR THIS POST

Cedar Tavern, Michael Dickson, ICON Design + Build, Mickie Spencer, Swan Dive, Hillside Farmacy, Eddy Patterson, John Scott, Paul Oglesby, Kelon Bryant, Continental Club, Justine's Brasserie, Jim Tripi, Spanish Oak Golf Club, Natalie Gazaui, Eberly

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