Film: Special Screenings
  • FILM

  • SEARCH FOR

WEDNESDAY JUNE 28
  • Bless Their Little Hearts (1983)

    Not rated, 80 min. Directed by Billy Woodberry. Starring Nate Hardman, Kaycee Moore and Angela Burnett.

    A new restoration of the classic of the L.A. Rebellion movement that took place at UCLA in the Seventies.

    6:45PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/861-7020

  • The Defenders (2017)

    In this series from aGLIFF Festival Director Jim Brunzell, someone is tasked with screening and defending a film that otherwise might have fallen through the cracks. This time, it's SXSW Film programmer Jarod Neece who provides the cinematic fodder.

    7:30PM Alamo Drafthouse Mueller, 1911 Aldrich #120, 512/572-1425

  • A Song for You: The Austin City Limits Story

    A Song for You: The Austin City Limits Story (2016)

    Not rated, 97 min. Directed by Keith Maitland.

    Keith (Tower) Maitland's film is a heartfelt and compelling history of the venerable PBS show, culminating to the program's 40th anniversary. A portion of the proceeds benefit ACL and stick around for a live performance fro Lord Buffalo.

    1:30PM, 4:30PM Alamo Drafthouse Mueller, 1911 Aldrich #120, 512/572-1425

  • What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?

    What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962)

    Not rated, 134 min. Directed by Robert Aldrich. Starring Bette Davis, Joan Crawford and Victor Buono.

    Classics: The Bette Davis/Joan Crawford Grand Guignol thriller.

    2PM, 7PM Cinemark Hill Country Galleria 14, 12812 Hill Country Blvd., 800/326-3264

  • Macbeth

    Macbeth (2008)

    Not rated, 200 min.

    Fathom Presents: The Metropolitan Opera: Giuseppe Verdi's opera.

    7PM Arbor Cinema @ Great Hills, 9828 Great Hills Trail, 512/231-9742

  • The Bad and the Beautiful (1952)

    Not rated, 118 min. Directed by Vincente Minnelli. Starring Kirk Douglas, Lana Turner and Walter Pidgeon.

    Summer Film Classics: The underbelly of Hollywood is exposed as a film producer unscrupulously does whatever he can to attain success.

    7PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • The Player

    The Player (1992)

    Summer Film Classics: As cynically funny as any movie made about Hollywood, Altman's film expresses a dissatisfaction with the state of the American movie without preaching. Read a full review of The Player.

    9:15PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • Little Fugitive

    Little Fugitive (1953)

    Not rated, 80 min. Directed by Morris Engel, Ray Ashley and Ruth Orkin. Starring Richie Andrusco and Ricky Brewster.

    Sunday School: Long considered a cornerstone of the American independent and cinema verité movements, Little Fugitive was also greatly admired by Cassavetes and Truffaut, whose first films both show signs of its influence. In it, a young boy is tricked into thinking he has killed his older brother and goes on the lam to Coney Island, while the very much alive older brother struggles to find him before their mother returns home. The black-and-white cinematography subtly reflects the passage of time, and the overall film captures the fears, mysteries, and joys encountered by a young boy on the streets and boardwalks of Brooklyn.

    7PM AFS Cinema, 6406 N I-35, #3100, 512/322-0145

SPACES
  • The LEGO Batman Movie

    The LEGO Batman Movie (2017)

    Rated PG, 104 min. Directed by Chris McKay.

    Everything is Batman in this boisterously entertaining cousin of the awesome The LEGO Movie. Channeling D.C. Comics, Christopher Nolan, and campy Sixties television, The LEGO Batman Movie elevates Emmet Brickowski’s sidekick in the original film to leading masked man in this fun-for-all follow-up that deconstructs the action hero’s brooding vigilante persona, brick-by-brick. It’s as if the Dark Knight somehow mated with the Caped Crusader, spawning a gravel-voiced bro-child (Arnett, brilliantly channeling Christian Bale) with relationship issues of every kind. (To quote the Man in Black, “Batman doesn’t do ’ships.”) The movie also serves as an origin story introducing youthful ward Dick Grayson and spunky police commissioner Barbara Gordon (aka Robin and Batgirl, respectively) to flesh out the cadre of Gotham City crime fighters our loner hero eventually learns to rely upon in the name of teamwork. The future sure looks bright for the LEGO movie franchise. Read a full review of The LEGO Batman Movie.

    8:45PM Blue Starlite Drive-In, 12419 Lowden Lane, 512/850-6127

  • The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

    The Boy in the Striped Pajamas (2008)

    Rated PG-13, 93 min. Directed by Mark Herman. Starring Asa Butterfield, Jack Scanlon, David Thewlis, Vera Farmiga, Amber Beattie, Richard Johnson, Sheila Hancock and Rupert Friend.

    Read-Watch-Talk: Vera Farmiga is a knockout in this otherwise predictable and emotionally manipulative story about the horror of the German concentration camps. Read a full review of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.

    6:30PM Yarborough Branch Library, 2200 Hancock

KIDS
  • Matilda (1996)

    Rated PG, 97 min. Directed by Danny DeVito. Starring Danny DeVito, Mara Wilson, Rhea Perlman, Embeth Davidtz, Pam Ferris, Paul Reubens and Tracey Walter.

    Kids Camp: Slipping easily from honeyed sunlight to malevolent shadow and back again, Danny DeVito's big-screen adaptation of Roald Dahl's Matilda alternately warms and chills but never leaves you feeling cooked to mush or frozen with terror. Matilda Wormwood (Wilson) is born a bright, white lamb of a girl into a family of boorish, black sheep who encourage Matilda to stay all day in their tackily decorated home watching TV in lieu of reading and going to school. Matilda finally gets her chance to attend school after her father's encounter with Trunchbull (Ferris), the child-hating principal of Crunchem Hall who, he senses, might be able to squelch Matilda's pure, discomfiting light. Crunchem Hall is huge, dark, and terrifying, but flowers and children blossom inside Crunchem under the furtive but gentle guidance of Matilda's teacher, the luminescent Miss Honey (Davidtz). The contrast of light and dark, good and evil, enlightenment and ignorance, innocence and corruption is the heart of this absurd, insightful, sincere, very funny fairy tale of a movie. Read a full review of Matilda.

    10AM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, 14028 U.S. Hwy. 183 N., 512/861-7070

  • 11:35AM Alamo Drafthouse Slaughter Lane, 5701 W. Slaughter, 512/861-7060

  • The Pirates!: Band of Misfits

    The Pirates!: Band of Misfits (2012)

    Rated PG, 88 min. Directed by Peter Lord and Jeff Newitt.

    Kids Camp: Young and old alike love a good pirate yarn and the stop-motion specialists at Aardman Animations deliver the goods. The daffy British humor may confound some of the youngest viewers but there is plenty of universal slapstick to supplement the drier Brit wit. The story is based on Gideon Defoe's book, The Pirates! in an Adventure With Scientists. Hugh Grant voices the Pirate Captain, a mediocre scalawag beloved by his crew, who covets the annual Pirate of the Year Award. Out at sea to capture more booty, the pirates instead capture Charles Darwin, who recognizes that the captain’s bird Polly is not a parrot but the last dodo on Earth. Queen Victoria (voiced by Staunton), the sworn enemy of pirates, wants the animal for her petting zoo, but has other, more nefarious reasons. Better use should have been made of the voice talent, but no one here needs to walk the plank. Read a full review of The Pirates!: Band of Misfits.

    11:30AM Alamo Drafthouse Mueller, 1911 Aldrich #120, 512/572-1425

  • Zathura

    Zathura (2005)

    Rated PG, 113 min. Directed by Jon Favreau. Starring Jonah Bobo, Josh Hutcherson, Dax Shepard, Kristen Stewart, Tim Robbins, Frank Oz, John Alexander and Derek Mears.

    Kids Camp: With his follow-up to Elf, actor-turned-director Jon Favreau sticks with family-friendly filmmaking, this time taking on the film version of Chris van Allsburg’s bestselling children’s book Zathura. This film succeeds in a way that neither of the previous van Allsburg film adaptations (Jumanji, The Polar Express) managed: It’s infused with a greater sense of fun and realism. Favreau keeps the picture throttling forward with a carefree charm: a space adventure that goes forth with a Buck Rogers attitude as silly gizmos, robots, and monsters turn from mildly goofy to dangerous and threatening in the blink of an eye. The tone of the fantasy and the effects are just right: enough to surprise and startle everyone and even spook the littlest ones, but so gleefully defiant of the laws of physics and aeronautics that it’s clear the film’s only objective is to have a good time. Read a full review of Zathura.

    10:15AM Alamo Drafthouse Village, 2700 W. Anderson, 512/861-7030

  • Rio 2

    Rio 2 (2014)

    Rated G, 101 min. Directed by Carlos Saldanha.

    Kids Summer Film Series: In this animated sequel, Blu (Eisenberg), Jewel (Hathaway), and their three children head from their home in Rio deep into the Amazon basin, where they find a whole flock of blue macaws that turn out to be Jewel’s long-lost family. Jewel, meeting both her father (Garcia) and an old love (Mars), is delighted to be with them in the jungle, but Blu is a city bird, uncomfortable with the father-in-law and unhappy about the ex. Rio 2 is loaded with terrific vocal talents (though they are mostly squandered), and is agog with characters all feverishly working to carry way too much plot. Less a celebration of Brazil than of homogenized Las Vegas stage-show aesthetics, the film's more ethnic elements are Mixmaster-blended into seamless Hollywood entertainment. All singing, all dancing, all color: Rio 2 is a modern, studio animation blockbuster – spilling all over the place, rather than arching into the sky. Read a full review of Rio 2.

    11AM Flix Brewhouse, 2200 S. I-35, 512/244-3549

BULLOCK MUSEUM IMAX

1800 Congress, 512/936-4629

  • Tiny Giants 3-D (2014)

    Not rated, 44 min. Directed by Mark Brownlow.

  • Transformers: The Last Knight

    Transformers: The Last Knight (2017)

    Rated PG-13, 149 min. Directed by Michael Bay. Starring Mark Wahlberg, Anthony Hopkins, Josh Duhamel, Laura Haddock, Isabela Moner, Santiago Cabrera, Jerrod Carmichael, Stanley Tucci, Gemma Chan, John Turturro, Glenn Morshower, Steve Buscemi and John Goodman.

    Director Michael Bay becomes officially “James Cameron-Lite” with this fifth installment in the painfully self-perpetuating Paramount/Hasbro summer franchise that, at nearly two-and-a-half hours, is nearly two-and-a-half hours too long. This latest entry is simply dumb, dull, and pointless. Apart from a jaunty performance from Sir “I’m Game for Anything” Hopkins, as a member of a fraternal order dating back to King Arthur (Tucci, no less), there’s very little meat to the discombobulated, lazy scripting by Art Marcum, Matt Holloway, and Ken Nolan. Let’s recap: King Arthur, Yeager as “the chosen one,” Guardians of the Galaxy’s Haddock as a fusty Oxford scholar whose destiny is to save the Earth, and, oh yeah, Bumblebee regains his true voice. It’s apparent from the outset that audience members new to the series should not choose this particular outing as an entry point unless they’re very high. You’re going to need to watch a full season of Ultraman and take two viewings of Pacific Rim before bedtime to wash the awful stank of Transformers: The Last Knight out of your head.

    Read a full review of Transformers: The Last Knight.

  • Wild Africa 3-D (2017)

    Not rated, 42 min. Directed by Patrick Morris and Neil Nightingale. Narrated by Helena Bonham Carter.

    Can't afford that African safari? Here's the next best thing.

This content has not been formatted for this window size.
Please increase the size of your browser window, or revisit this page on a mobile device.
NEWSLETTERS
AC Daily, Events and Promotions, Luvdoc Answers

Breaking news, recommended events, and more

Official Chronicle events, promotions, and giveaways

Updates for SXSW 2017

All questions answered (satisfaction not guaranteed)