Ourshelves

The Jennifers (Lueckemeyer and Kryska): Ear Candy, KOOP 91.7FM

Ourshelves
Photo By Kate Cantrill

What sort of brain food sits on the shelves of the women who spin Ear Candy? A colorful, tasty mix of literary fiction, musical criticism, and naturalist musings. Even before the Jennifers shared a mic, they shared books. They admit (through transmittable giggles) that it started with the mighty hardcover, Morrissey & Marr, The Severed Alliance: The Definitive Story of the Smiths by Johnny Rogan.

"We were big fans," Jennifer K. says.

"We met Morrissey and we sat down and cried," adds Jennifer L.

Now that she's all grown up, Jennifer L. highly recommends reading Sand Country Almanac by Aldo Leopold, a naturalist, poet, philosopher. As well she loves to read John McPhee and Theroux.

"I rarely choose blindly," she says, regarding purchasing books. She works in an environmental resource management position and says that if she is going to purchase a book, as opposed to borrowing it, it will be a field guide.

Jennifer K., who works as a multimedia production assistant, prefers feeding her brain fiction like Margaret Atwood's The Blind Assassin and Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible.

"I devoured past housemates' books," she says, when asked about how she chooses what to read.

Have they always been readers? Jennifer K.'s eyes grow wide and she nods. "Since elementary school."

Jennifer L. says, "Books were not a big part of my family's life, much less than, say, MTV." In high school she read Wuthering Heights and learned that reading was a terrific form of distraction and escape. Now she proudly displays the spines of her collection on her packed shelf -- Laura Esquivel's Like Water for Chocolate, Julia Alvarez's How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, Annie Proulx's The Shipping News, among others.

She says that looking at someone's bookshelf is "like looking at someone's record collection!" In it you'll find the loves, the losses, the guilty pleasures.

Jennifer K. laughs and holds up Valley of the Dolls. Then she picks up and flips through a strange little comic book called Freddy the Fetus. It looks a bit like Harold and the Purple Crayon, although Harold is not born yet, and there is no crayon.

The Jennifers lounge among some of their favorite books, laughing and reliving a moment in which they lay supine upon the blown-up face of Morrissey, trying hard not to giggle in front of the camera, as it was meant to be a very serious homage.

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KEYWORDS FOR THIS STORY

Jennifer Lueckemeyer, Jennifer Kryska, Ear Candy, KOOP 91.7

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